How architects and artists turned an urban dump in Chile into a performance space

THE WAVE. (COURTESY THE SCARCITY AND CREATIVITY STUDIO)

THE WAVE. (COURTESY THE SCARCITY AND CREATIVITY STUDIO)

Sitio Eriazo—a Chilean collective of recent graduates from theater, art, and architecture schools—worked with the Oslo School of Architecture and Design’s Scarcity and Creativity Studio to recover an abandoned urban space in Valparaíso, Chile.

Continue after the jump.

Detroit the first U.S. city to be named a UNESCO City of Design

Design, Midwest, News
Tuesday, December 22, 2015
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Detroit's Renaissance Center, home to General Motors, will say goodbye to Cadillac. (Loren Sztajer via Flickr)

Detroit’s Renaissance Center. (Loren Sztajer via Flickr)

Detroit has joined 16 other cities designated by UNESCO as a City of Design as part of its Creative Cities Network. Detroit is the first U.S. city to be named a City of Design, and one of only five other cities in the U.S. to be inducted into the Creative Cities Network.

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Why critics are skeptical of renovations bringing eternal youth to Chartres Cathedral

OLD AND NEW AT CHARTRES CATHEDRAL. (COURTESY LAWRENCE OP, FLICKR)

OLD AND NEW AT CHARTRES CATHEDRAL. (COURTESY LAWRENCE OP FLICKR)

In 2009, the French Ministry of Culture began an $18 million restoration of the medieval Chartres Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site 50 miles southwest of Paris. By 2017, the Gothic structure is intended to look similar to the original 1194–1250 construction. However, as the past 765 years  of dirt and grime are erased, critics are denouncing the project.

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Edinburgh’s “Turd” building could cost the city its World Heritage Site status

Rendering of the Ribbon. (Courtesy Jestico + Whiles)

Rendering of the Ribbon. (Courtesy Jestico + Whiles)

While Philadelphia is just joining the ranks of World Heritage Cities, Edinburgh, Scotland, could be on its way out. Edinburgh’s yellow-brown, sandstone buildings, elegant extensions to the capital’s landscape, are set to receive new neighbors from developers. The approved plans have sent UNESCO to reassess Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site Listing.

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Philadelphia is the United States’ first World Heritage City

East, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
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Independence Hall, built in 1753, was the site of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the meeting place of the Second Continental Congress, and the site of the Constitutional Convention. The structure is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as well as the central building in Independence National Historic Park (Wikimedia Commons)

Independence Hall, built in 1753, was the site of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the meeting place of the Second Continental Congress, and the site of the Constitutional Convention. The structure is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as well as the central building in Independence National Historic Park (Wikimedia Commons)

What do Safranbolu, Turkey; Gyeongju, Korea; Cidade Velha, Cape Verde; and Philadelphia, PA, have in common? They are all World Heritage Cities. On November 6, the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC) honored Philadelphia with a World Heritage City designation. Philadelphia is the first United States city to be recognized by the OWHC.

More after the jump.

ISIS militants demolish ancient heritage sites in Syria after vowing to leave them unharmed

Destruction of Baalshamin Temple (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Destruction of Baalshamin Temple d (Courtesy Wikipedia)

World heritage sites in the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria are being bombed by the militant group ISIS. The 2,000-year-old Temple of Baalshamin and Temple of Bel in Palmyra, designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites, have allegedly been destroyed by the terrorist group. Images featuring the explosion posted through social-media accounts in affiliation with ISIS depict the bombings.

Continue reading after the jump.

In Beirut, a group of activists seeks to protect a coastal area by setting up a grassroots design ideas competition

The Dalieh of Raouche. (Christian Sowa)

The Dalieh of Raouche. (Christian Sowa)

In the last two decades, Beirut’s real estate market boomed and transformed the city. One of the yet non-developed areas of the city is a coastal area called Dalieh. Despite the fact that this area is privately owned, it was used as an openly accessible space by the public for years. However, recent development plans, aiming to build a high-end real estate complex, would largely change the open access and current character of this space.

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On View> “UNESCOitalia: Italy’s World Heritage Sites” Opens December 6th in San Francisco

On View, West
Thursday, December 5, 2013
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The Cloisters of St. Andrea Cathedral. (Luciano Romano)

The Cloisters of St. Andrea Cathedral. (Luciano Romano)

UNESCOitalia: Italy’s World Heritage Sites in the Works of 14 Photographers
Mueso Italo Americano
Fort Mason Center, Building C
San Francisco
December 6 to January 26, 2014

In celebration of 2013: The Year of Italian Culture in the United States, the Museo Italo Americano, in partnership with the Italian Cultural Institute and the Consulate General of Italy in San Francisco, will be showcasing a collection of images of Italy’s UNESCO World Heritage sites as seen through the lenses of 14 prominent Italian photographers.

Continue reading after the jump.

19 Sites Inscribed to UNESCO World Heritage List

International, Preservation
Wednesday, July 17, 2013
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Wooden Tserkvas of the Carpathian Region in Poland and Ukraine (National Heritage Board of Poland)

Wooden Tserkvas of the Carpathian Region in Poland and Ukraine (National Heritage Board of Poland)

At its 37th session held from June 16 to 27, 2013 in Phnom Pehnh and Siem Reap-Angkor, Cambodia, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee added 19 sites to the World Heritage List. The new additions bring the list to 981 noteworthy destinations. To be included on the World Heritage List, sites must be of exceptional universal significance and satisfy at least one out of ten selection criteria, which are frequently improved by the Committee to reflect the advancement of the World Heritage notion itself.

The list of newly added sites after the jump.

Land Crisis Puts Pressure on Lutyens’ Housing Quarter in New Delhi

International
Wednesday, May 22, 2013
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A house in New Delhi's Lutyens Bungalow Zone. (Courtesy World Monument Fund)

A house in New Delhi’s Lutyens Bungalow Zone. (Courtesy World Monument Fund)

Indian officials have proposed that high-rises be built on the site of Edwin Lutyens-designed bungalows dating from the 1920s and 1930s, threatening Delhi’s colonial era architecture, according to the Guardian. Lutyens’ Delhi, a 3,000-acre zone containing the Mughal Garden at Rashtrapati Bhavan, has endured monsoons, riots, and acid rain, but now many of the area’s government buildings, parks, and homes have met a new menace: a scheme to loosen planning limitations to permit construction of high-rise structures.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Babel Books, High Line, Tower Trouble, Twin Lions

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, May 17, 2011
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Artist Marta Minujin's "Tower of Babel" made from books in Argentina. (Courtesy Buenos Aires World Book Capital)

Artist Marta Minujin's "Tower of Babel" made from books in Argentina. (Courtesy Buenos Aires World Book Capital)

Tower of Babel. Argentinian artist Marta Minujin has created an 82-foot tall “Tower of Babel” in Buenos Aires after the city was named UNESCO’s World Book Capital for 2011. Readers, libraries, and 50 embassies donated over 30,000 books in a variety of languages to fill the twisting structure. The Guardian has a slideshow and we posted a video of the tower after the jump.

High Line Caution. Witold Rybczynski penned an op-ed for the NY Times cautioning the many would-be High Line copy cats that the success of the New York wonder-park (and a Parisian predecessor) aren’t because of the parks themselves, but because of their unique situations in dense, thriving cities.

Tower Trouble. The Wall Street Journal writes that skyscraper construction has dropped off drastically from decades past to the tune of 14 million fewer square feet per decade than the period between 1950 and 1990. Can New York maintain its global competitiveness without ramping up construction?

Twin Lions. Two stone lions, Leo Astor and Leo Lenox, have been standing sentinel at the New York Public Library’s main entrance on Fifth Avenue since 1911. Ephemeral New York posted a little more history on the backstory of the big cats.

Watch the Tower of Babel video after the jump.

Pictorial> Modern Airport in an Ancient Town

International
Wednesday, February 2, 2011
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A new airport by J. Mayer H. in Mestia (Courtesy J. Mayer H. Architects)

A new airport by J. Mayer H. in Mestia (Courtesy J. Mayer H. Architects)

A small, twisting airport in Mestia, a medieval town in the Democratic Republic of Georgia manages to capture the essence of the UNESCO World Heritage Site’s ancient stone defensive towers while still standing on its own as a skyward-reaching modern structure.

More after the jump.

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