DXU Delivers Luxe Minimalism in Dekton

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DXU wrapped Porsche Design's Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

DXU wrapped Porsche Design’s Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

Sleek black rain screen reflects Porsche Design’s understated style.

In the world of high-end retail, first impressions matter. Knowing this, DXU, LLC principal Eric Styer took special care selecting a facade material for the Porsche Design boutique in Oak Brook, Illinois. Read More

Apple is planning to build a viewing platform and visitors center so you can gaze upon its Foster-designed headquarters

(CITY OF CUPERTINO VIA SILICON VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL)

(CITY OF CUPERTINO VIA SILICON VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL)

Apple’s upcoming doughnut-shaped flying saucer of a headquarters is steadily taking shape in Cupertino, California. The Norman Foster–designed, $5 billion complex obviously strays from the typical office park setup of clusters of boxy, generic buildings, but despite its starchitect design, it has attracted plenty of criticism for how little it engages with the community and the non-Apple employees who walk among us.

But apparently that’s not the whole story.

Architect proposes to urbanize the forest with these car-free, zero-waste houses disguised as trees

(Courtesy The OAS1S Foundation)

(Courtesy The OAS1S Foundation)

One Dutch architect has re-envisioned suburbia and city centers as car-free urban forests in which dwellings are disguised as trees. Raimond de Hullu’s new home designs, known as OAS1S, feature tall, slim, detached townhouses shaped like the numeral “1” as symbols of the “deep human need to become one with nature.”

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This Saturday, a projection-mapped display will cover the Empire State Building to raise awareness about endangered species

Art, East, On View, Skyscrapers
Thursday, July 30, 2015
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As supertall residential towers reach new heights in Manhattan, the Empire State Building still stands strong in New York City‘s skyline—especially after dusk. The building’s crown is quintessential New York and a sky-high representation of holidays, anniversaries, and the day’s news in colorful light. On Saturday night, the Empire State Building will be used for even more.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Here’s how students from IIT used cutting edge technology to craft a rippling carbon fiber facade

CARBONskin was designed and fabricated by IIT students this spring. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

CARBONskin was designed and fabricated by IIT students this spring. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

Though only one semester had elapsed since the student-designed and fabricated FIBERwave carbon fiber pavilion went up, by early 2015 IIT professor Alphonso Peluso was hungry for more.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architect Chad Oppenheim on Getting Back in Touch With Nature

Cor, Miami, Florida. (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

Cor, Miami, Florida. (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

Asked about the pros and cons of practicing architecture in South Florida, Miami-based Oppenheim Architecture + Design principal and lead designer Chad Oppenheim said, “It’s always wonderful to design buildings in a beautiful environment such as Miami.”

More after the jump.

In a commentary against waste-producing lifestyles, Indian artist creates a sculpture made from 70,000 bottle caps

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

Indian artist Arunkumar HG has created a somewhat tongue-in-cheek calling out of our throwaway, waste-producing lifestyles with a shoreline sculpture made from nearly 70,000 bottle screw caps. The artist amassed the collection from his neighborhood over the course of a year, carefully stacked the caps, and connected them in vertical configurations using steel filaments.

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Can the latest plan to salvage LaGuardia take flight? New York Governor Cuomo unveils ambitious $4 billion airport redesign scheme

(Courtesy Office of the Governor)

(Courtesy Office of the Governor)

For New Yorkers and visitors alike, LaGuardia Airport is a confusing maze of disconnected terminals. Beset with delays, chaotic transfers, poorly designed wayfinding, and congestion for both passengers and planes, the airport was recently, not undeservingly, characterized by Vice President Biden as feeling like a “third-world country.” Now the facility is slated to get a much-needed, and long overdue redesign. Governor Cuomo presented a far-reaching plan to overhaul the tired facility, which would cost roughly $4 billion, and be completed over a 5-year period.

Continue reading after the jump.

Honoring the forgotten: Melbourne-based artist Robbie Rowlands makes Detroit’s abandoned houses come to life

(Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

‘In Between’ (Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

The deteriorating floorboards and walls of abandoned homes appear to defiantly reassert their existence in artist Robbie Rowlands’ exhibition, Intervention. While on residency in Detroit, Michigan, the Melbourne-based artist drew attention to abandoned houses by ripping out certain sections and creating track-like extensions of their fixtures—so that the otherwise nondescript wall seems to implore, “pay attention to me.”

Continue reading after the jump.

2015 Best of Products Awards> Visionaries

Awards, National, Product
Wednesday, July 29, 2015
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vision3-1of2

(Courtesy Nissha Printing Company)

On a hot day in June, a jury convened to review nearly 400 entries to The Architect’s Newspaper first Best of Products competition. Submissions, divided over eight categories, abounded in new materials and exciting technologies, provoking a lively dialogue during the evaluation process.

Colin Brice of Mapos, Barry Goralnick of Barry Goralnick Architects, Harshad Pillai of Fogarty Finger Architecture, and architect Alison Spear generously contributed their considerable expertise and insight to the judging.

The complete roster of winners can be found in our just-published print edition, and online here. In this final installment of reporting the competition results, we recognize four products as Visionaries. Whether a prototype or already in production, these pieces caught the jury’s attention for their pursuit of pure design ideals.

Read More

Wine supplier to the British royal family unveils enchanting new cellar by MJP Architects and Short & Associates

(Courtesy Berry Bros. & Rudd)

(Courtesy Berry Bros. & Rudd)

Britain’s oldest wine merchant, Berry Bros. & Rudd, has unveiled its new subterranean Sussex Cellar, an enchanting juxtaposition of classic and modern by Short & Associates and MJP Architects. Wine suppliers to the British royal family since the reign of King George III in the early 19th century, the brand named its new cellar after the duke of Sussex, one of seven royal dukes who were regular customers during that era.

More after the jump.

Cincinnati’s U.S. Bank Arena unveils major overhaul and expansion to stay relevant amid regional competition

U.S. Bank Arena concept. (MSA Sport)

U.S. Bank Arena concept. (MSA Sport)

A major renovation and expansion project planned for Cincinnati‘s U.S. Bank Arena could further change the face of the city’s rapidly evolving riverfront.

COntinue reading after the jump.

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