Developer Andrew Frey on aesthetics versus urbanism in Miami’s building codes

2020 Salzedo rental homes in Coral Gables. (Courtesy Andrew Frey / Codina)

2020 Salzedo rental homes in Coral Gables. (Courtesy Andrew Frey / Codina)

When it comes to navigating Miami’s zoning codes, Tecela principal Andrew Frey brings an experience-based advantage to the table. Before transitioning to the business side of development in early 2011, he spent six years as a zoning lawyer. “I always wanted to be a developer, and I learned a lot from my developer clients,” recalled Frey.

Read more after the jump.

From fortress to town square: Los Angeles launches a competition to remake Pershing Square

PERSHING SQUARE AS IT LOOKS NOW. (DAVID A GALVAN / FLICKR)

PERSHING SQUARE AS IT LOOKS NOW. (DAVID A GALVAN / FLICKR)

Ricardo Legorreta’s much maligned design for Pershing Square is getting a makeover. The day after the Los Angeles City Council voted to support a public-private partnership to overhaul the five-acre urban park, councilmember José Huizar and Pershing Square Renew announced an international design competition geared to rethink the open space that now sits ingloriously on top of an underground parking garage.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City is getting serious about future superstorms with $100 million to fund floodwater mitigation

"BIG U" PROPOSED PATH AROUND LOWER MANHATTAN (COURTESY BIG)

“BIG U” PROPOSED PATH AROUND LOWER MANHATTAN (COURTESY BIG)

On August 27th, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and the NYC Office of Resilience & Recovery announced plans to spend $100 million to fortify lower Manhattan against future superstorms. The latest proposal calls for green spaces, levees, and floodwalls to protect the area from East 23rd Street to Montgomery Street, and around the northern tip of Battery Park City.

Continue reading after the jump.

These six groups just got $3 million each for housing, placemaking projects

Cook Inlet Housing Authority: "The heart of our Loussac Place development features a play area for young residents and seating for parents." Courtesy Artplace America

Cook Inlet Housing Authority: “The heart of our Loussac Place development features a play area for young residents and seating for parents.” (Courtesy Artplace America)

President Barack Obama has announced that in tandem with a program by the National Endowment for the ArtsArtPlace America will invest $18 million in six place-based organizations, four of which focus on place-making.

Continue reading after the jump.

Remember the Battery Park City wheatfield? Conceptual artist is back with a horticultural pyramid in Queens

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

The Living Pyramid. (Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

 

[Editor’s Note: Socrates Sculpture Park on the Queens waterfront installed The Living Pyramid, a public sculpture by Agnes Denes in May, when this article was originally published. They have just announced that they will extend the life of the sculpture through the end of October. The work is Denes’ first since her iconic Wheatfield – A Confrontation in 1982, sited on a waterfront landfill in what is now Battery Park City in Lower Manhattan. Do not miss this chance to see this important artwork before it comes down next month.]

Monuments of pre-civilization feats in construction and engineering, pyramids are the latest muse of conceptual artist Agnes Denes who, in 1982, transformed what is now Battery Park City into a two-acre wheatfield.

Continue reading after the jump.

British architects are now deciding which one of these six finalists is the worst building of the year

Architecture, Awards, International
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
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Gary Ullah / Flickr

(Gary Ullah / Flickr)

Six of the worst buildings in Britain, shortlisted by British magazine Building Design, will battle it out to claim British architecture’s least wanted trophy.

View the shortlist after the jump.

Here’s Dallas’ plan to build tiny homes for the homeless to save lives and money

Architecture, Development, Southwest
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
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(Courtesy bcWORKSHOP)

(Courtesy bcWORKSHOP)

Taking a cue from a program in Houston, Dallas has decided to house 50 homeless people using low-cost cottages designed by bcWORKSHOP, short for Building Community Workshop.

Continue reading after the jump.

As starchitect-designed condos pop-up along the High Line, Chelsea’s art galleries look for a new home

Architecture, Art, Development, East
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
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September 2014, Chelsea, New York. (Courtesy John Gillespie)

September 2014, Chelsea, New York. (John Gillespie / Flickr)

As rents go up in a city succumbing to gentrification, the few remaining art galleries in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood have either left or are looking set to leave.

Continue after the jump.

Pittsburgh in the making: Carnegie Museum of Art examines the building blocks of a progressive city

Architecture, East, Midwest, On View, Preservation
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
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Newman-Schmidt Studios: Workmen installing the first aluminum panel, 1951 (Courtesy Director’s Discretionary Fund)

Newman-Schmidt Studios: Workmen installing the first aluminum panel, 1951. (Courtesy Director’s Discretionary Fund)

In the 1950s, Pittsburgh was the American poster child for a progressive city. Forward-thinking gentrification projects such as the Gateway Center, a five-building office complex, and Allegheny Center, the former hub of downtown Allegheny City, were part of a transformative frenzy of high-rise constructions during the postwar period.

Read More

Chicago recycled an old rapid-transit station and sold its pieces at public auction

Architecture, Midwest, News, Preservation
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
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Pieces of the old Madison-Wabash CTA El Station were auctioned off last week. (Rebuilding Exchange)

Pieces of the old Madison-Wabash CTA El Station were auctioned off last week. (Rebuilding Exchange)

More than 800 people flocked to Chicago‘s premier recycled building materials clearing house, the Rebuilding Exchange, last week in search of a piece of Chicago history. The nonprofit was auctioning off chunks of the Chicago Transit Authority’s (CTA) Madison-Wabash CTA El Station, which will be replaced next year. Read More

The Good, The Bad & The Ugly: Architect builds a shocking pavilion to explore society’s domination of nature

(Courtesy Atelier Van Lieshout)

(Courtesy Atelier Van Lieshout)

Bochum, Germany is host to Ruhrtriennale, a six week art festival which opened last weekend and gave Joep van Lieshout of Atelier van Lieshout a chance to create his biggest—and most shocking—work to date.

More after the jump.

ISIS militants demolish ancient heritage sites in Syria after vowing to leave them unharmed

Destruction of Baalshamin Temple (Courtesy Wikipedia)

Destruction of Baalshamin Temple d (Courtesy Wikipedia)

World heritage sites in the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria are being bombed by the militant group ISIS. The 2,000-year-old Temple of Baalshamin and Temple of Bel in Palmyra, designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites, have allegedly been destroyed by the terrorist group. Images featuring the explosion posted through social-media accounts in affiliation with ISIS depict the bombings.

Continue reading after the jump.

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