This prefab steel cabin from Copenhagen takes glamping to a whole new level

Other
Friday, February 27, 2015
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(Courtesy Vipp)

(Courtesy Vipp)

Danish design studio Vipp recently debuted a fully-furnished, prefabricated shelter touted as a “plug and play getaway” and “all-inclusive nature retreat.” This ready-to-use, minimalist cabin is just 592 square feet and is designed to reunite man with nature by integrating into its surroundings with a steel facade and predominantly dark tones that defer to the surrounding scenery.

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St. Louis is the latest to pursue a bike share system

Potential stations for a bike sharing system in St. Louis. (Alta /  Great Rivers Greenway)

Potential stations for a bike sharing system in St. Louis. (Alta / Great Rivers Greenway)

St. Louis could become the latest city to join the wave of bike sharing programs already prevalent in cities from Washington, D.C. to Portland, Oregon.

Great Rivers Greenway—a special taxing district created in 2000, when St. Louisans devoted a tenth-of-a-cent sales tax premium to for the creation of trails and parks—issued a request for qualifications in December. Now a feasibility study from bike sharing firm Alta Planning + Design says the city’s ready for a two-year roll out of 60 stations with 540 bikes, with 30 additional stations and 250 bikes to follow. Read More

Animated film shows how growing up with modernist architect parents comes with its own challenges

Architecture, Art, International
Friday, February 27, 2015
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modern-arch-parents-01

Still from Me and My Moulton.

A short film called Me and My Moulton by director Torill Kove takes a humorous look at growing up with parents who are “modernist architects”—and it’s been nominated for an Academy Award under “Best Animated Short Film.” Told from the perspective of of a seven-year-old middle child, the challenges of growing up with architect parents include three-legged dinner table chairs and a house that your friends think is a bit odd.

Watch the trailer after the jump.

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Breaking! Renderings and video of Bjarke Ingels’ and Heatherwick’s Google headquarters unveiled

(Courtesy BIG & Heatherwick Studio)

(Courtesy BIG & Heatherwick Studio)

Just two days ago, AN brought you word that Copenhagen- and New York–based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and London-based Heatherwick Studio were teaming up to design the new headquarters for Google in Mountain View, California. At the time, it was only being reported that the complex would comprise “a series of canopylike buildings.” Well, now we know what those canopylike buildings will look like and a whole lot more.

Continue reading after the jump.

Clive Wilkinson Architects Makes a Superdesk

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Clive Wilkinson Architects designed a continuous work surface dubbed the Superdesk for New York advertisers the Barbarian Group. (Michael Moran)

Clive Wilkinson Architects designed a continuous work surface dubbed the Superdesk for New York advertisers the Barbarian Group. (Michael Moran)

Endless table materializes intra-office connectivity in plywood, MDF, and epoxy.

When Culver City-based Clive Wilkinson Architects (CWA) sat down with representatives of the Barbarian Group to discuss renovating the advertising agency’s new 20,000-square-foot office, one word kept coming up: connection. “Before, they were all in offices designed for one person, but crammed five in each, and scattered,” recalled associate principal Chester Nielsen. “It was a pain. Bringing everyone into the open, and having them feel like they were all connected was super important.” The architects elected to “surgically gut” the leased New York Garment District loft to create a central workspace for between 125-175 employees. To materialize the theme of connection, they zeroed in on the idea of a single work surface, an endless table later christened the Superdesk. With 4,400 square feet of epoxy-coated surface atop a support structure comprising 870 unique laser-cut plywood panels, the Superdesk is a triumph of programmatic creativity. “Building a big table was not an obvious solution,” said Nielsen, “but it’s a simple one.”
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Watch the last person in Los Angeles skateboard through abandoned highways and streets

City Terrain, Transportation, Urbanism, West
Thursday, February 26, 2015
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abandoned-la-01

While Los Angeles is trying to shake its image as a city of cars, it sure has a lot of roads and highways. And unless you’re behind the wheel, you probably won’t be able to play in the middle of them (unless you’re headed to CicLAvia). Then comes along filmmaker Russell Houghten, who captured an eerily abandoned LA in his short film, Urban Isolation.

Watch the video after the jump.

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Minneapolis takes a cue from the Netherlands with city’s first woonerf shared street

A woonerf street in Jimbocho, Tokyo. (Rob Ketcherside via Flickr)

A woonerf street in Jimbocho, Tokyo. (Rob Ketcherside via Flickr)

A residential development in downtown Minneapolis is set to give the city its first woonerf, a road type developed in the Netherlands that integrates vehicle traffic and parking with pedestrians, bicyclists and public amenities. Read More

Check out these five finalists named in the Mies van der Rohe Awards

Architecture, Awards, International
Thursday, February 26, 2015
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Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Five projects have been short-listed in the 2015 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture—Mies van der Rohe Award. Over the next few weeks, jury members will visit each of the five buildings and a winner will be announced on May 8th at the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona. You can take a look at the five finalists below.

View the finalists after the jump.

As New York City builds its first micro-units, Portlandia expertly mocks the trend

Architecture, Development, East, Urbanism
Thursday, February 26, 2015
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My Micro NY. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

My Micro NY. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

The concept of micro-living is really having a moment right now. For starters, there is a TV shaw called Tiny House Nation that celebrates the trend of packing fully functioning homes into bite-sized spaces where all redundancies are removed and functionality is king. Beds become couches, kitchen counters become desks, bathtubs become second bedrooms, and so on and so forth.

Continue reading after the jump.

Are you ready for some football stadiums? Los Angeles gets even more proposals for its yet-unsecured NFL team

Architecture, Unveiled, West
Thursday, February 26, 2015
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Raiders/ Chargers stadium in Carson (Manica Architecture)

Raiders/ Chargers stadium in Carson (Manica Architecture)

Just when we thought Los Angeles’ football stadium craziness had cooled down, the owners of the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders have unveiled plans for a 72,000 seat, $1.7 billion stadium on a 168-acre site in Carson—which should soon be on that city’s ballot—while Inglewood City Council approved a measure to build a stadium for the (for now) St. Louis Rams, originally floated by Rams’ owner Stan Kroenke.

Continue reading after the jump.

Brooklyn’s 56 Bogart is at the center of the New York City art world

Art, East, On View
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
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Henry Khudyakov's Environmental Motif, 1985-1994. (Courtesy Henry Khudyakov)

Henry Khudyakov’s Environmental Motif, 1985-1994. (Courtesy Henry Khudyakov)

 

If the address 56 Bogart in Brooklyn means nothing to you then you’re missing the center of the art world in New York City in 2015. Forget about Chelsea and the Bowery, Bushwick and East Williamsburg are the most exciting exhibition outposts in the city and maybe in the country. It’s Soho 40 years ago as any Saturday afternoon stroll along Bogart Street will make clear with its cafes, bars, restaurants and working artists lofts on every block.

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PlanPhilly leaving PennPraxis for WHYY

East, Media, Urbanism
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
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(Flickr / tracktwentynine)

(Flickr / tracktwentynine)

PlanPhilly, the non-profit site that covers all things planning and urbanism in Philadelphia, is leaving PennPraxis at the University of Pennsylvania for WHYY, a public media outlet that brings the world Terry Gross. The site was launched in 2006 and has been reporting on the city’s dramatic evolution ever since.

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