DXA Studio designed this Lower East Side tower with a copper facade that changes over time

(Courtesy DXA Studio)

(Courtesy DXA Studio)

As this angular copper facade ages, its reddish brown skin will settle into a weathered green. It’s a sort of physical embodiment of the changes playing out in Manhattan’s Lower East Side and Chinatown as the city’s voracious luxury residence market continually searches for a new frontier.

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On View> Gregory Ain: Low-Cost Modern Housing and The Construction of a Social Landscape

Architecture, Art, On View, West
Monday, April 20, 2015
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Ain's Dunsmuir Flats (Julius Shulman)

Ain’s Dunsmuir Flats (Julius Shulman/ J.Paul Getty Trust)

Gregory Ain: Low-Cost Modern Housing and The Construction of a Social Landscape
WUHO Gallery
6518 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles
Through April 26

Gregory Ain was a pioneer in the development of low-cost modern housing, and many of his efforts fused radical, left-wing politics and cooperative living with architecture. And a new exhibit in Los Angeles spotlights five of the architect’s most innovative housing projects.

Continue reading after the jump.

Biomimicry guides the design of Shanghai’s new nautilus-shaped museum of natural history

Shanghai Natural History Museum (©Steinkamp Photography)

Shanghai Natural History Museum. (Steinkamp Photography)

This weekend a Shanghai museum got a new home, and its design takes a major cue from nature. The Shanghai Natural History Museum wraps 479,180 square feet of exhibition space with facades inspired by the elements, natural phenomena, and the biological structure of cells.

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In just a few years, this tower by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill will be the tallest residential building on Planet Earth

(Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill)

(Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill)

The tallest of Manhattan’s rising supertall towers has been revealed—and believe it or not, the building that will make New York’s current crop of skyscrapers look like walkups is very, very glassy.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> This might be your only chance to see this rare Le Corbusier tapestry commissioned by Jørn Utzon

Art, East
Monday, April 20, 2015
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(Courtesy Bruun Rasmussen)

(Courtesy Bruun Rasmussen)

In mid May, New York City will be over run with fairs, exhibitions, and trade shows dedicated to design and art. The big events are the International Contract Furniture Fair (ICFF) and the Frieze Art Fair, but there will be literally scores of smaller spin-off events taking place that will be of interest to the architecture community.

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New York City to install 90 curbside bioswales to help clean Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal

Bioswale. (Courtesy NYC DEP)

Bioswale. (Courtesy NYC DEP)

As new apartment buildings continue to rise in Gowanus, Brooklyn, New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has announced plans to install 90 bioswales nearby in hopes of cleaning the neighborhood’s eponymous—and oh-so-polluted—canal.

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You’ll want to stop by the Dia in New York City to see LaMonte Young’s “truly immersive” Dream House

Art, East, On View
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Courtesy Dia Art Foundation)

(Courtesy Dia Art Foundation)

In New York in the 1960s and ’70s, a movement against pictorial, illusionistic, or fictive art began to favor more direct and literal figurations. This movement—now called Minimalism by many—was often spatial in nature as it was drawn on flat surfaces, sculpted, and displayed in white box galleries.

Continue reading after the jump.

JetBlue wants to turn Eero Saarinen’s iconic TWA terminal into a hotel

An old TWA drawing of its terminal in the 1960's via Todd Lappin/Flickr.

A 1960’s drawing of the TWA Terminal. (Flickr / Todd Lappin)

JetBlue Airlines—the one with free snacks and live television—is interested in getting into the hotel business, and it wants to kick things off with Eero Saarinen‘s swooping TWA Terminal at JFK Airport.

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Yes, there’s a Museum of Barbed Wire in Lacrosse, Kansas showcasing 2,400 different varieties—and yes, it’s legit

Design, Midwest
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Courtesy KansasTravel.org)

(Courtesy KansasTravel.org)

It’s hard to refrain from making barbed jokes about the Kansas Museum of Barbed Wire when it sounds like a half-hearted April Fool’s ruse, but yes, this place is actually real.

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These competition-winning bus shelters in Austin will harvest rainwater for a pocket park

(Courtesy Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

(Courtesy Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

It’s a matter of time before the canine-abused fire hydrant is outfitted with its own sound system—like this park bench. Two designers are retooling a high-traffic bus stop in Austin, Texas, to incorporate a pocket park for city dwellers to revisit distant nature.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Beneath this 200 year old monument to George Washington, a time capsule filled with 3D printed scans will send messages to the future

East, Preservation, Technology
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Ed Gunts)

(Ed Gunts)

What do you put in a 21st century time capsule inside the cornerstone of a 19th century landmark that’s undergoing restoration? If the landmark is the nation’s first monument to George Washington, you put in a 3D printed likeness of the first president, hot off the 3D printer, of course. That’s the idea behind the four shiny objects that will be sealed within an 1815-era cornerstone and placed below the base of the Washington Monument in Baltimore, Maryland, home of the aforementioned first monument to Washington.

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Beantown Goes Deep Green with ISA

Brought to you with support from:
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Interface Studio Architects' 226-232 Highland was the first project built under Boston's E+ Green Building Program. (Sam Oberter)

Interface Studio Architects’ 226-232 Highland was the first project built under Boston’s E+ Green Building Program. (Sam Oberter)

Boston launches a sustainable housing initiative with net-zero energy townhomes.

As anyone who has come into contact with Red Sox Nation knows, Bostonians tend not to believe in half measures. A case in point is the city’s E+ Green Building Program, a joint initiative of the Office of Environment & Energy Services, the Department of Neighborhood Development, and the Boston Redevelopment Authority. Designed to demonstrate the feasibility of building net-zero energy, multi-unit housing in an urban context, the program made its built debut in 2013 with 226-232 Highland Street, a development consisting of four three-bedroom townhomes in Boston‘s Roxbury neighborhood. The building achieved substantial energy savings on a tight budget in part through a highly insulated facade constructed from conventional materials. “The envelope is key,” explained Interface Studio Architects (ISA) principal Brian Phillips. “We design many super high performance projects and we believe strongly in the quality of the envelope as the starting point.”
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