Heather Roberge’s En Pointe installation finds stability in eccentricity

Architecture, West
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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Heather Roberge's En Point installation is a mediation on the history of the column. (Joshua White)

Heather Roberge’s En Point installation is a meditation on the history of the column. (Joshua White)

“They don’t rely on anything except each other to stand up,” noted Heather Roberge, principal of the architecture practice Murmur, as she wove through the leaning, gleaming steel columns of her installation En Pointe. “There is a structural interdependence between each member, showing that you can use strategies of eccentricity to produce stability.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Products> Hot Products for Hot Summer Days

National, Product, Spec Sheet
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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Spec Sheet  
3-vitrocsa-FRAN-SILVESTRE-ARQUITECTOS-VALENCIA-11-copy-550x361

(Courtesy Vitrocsa)

Landscape lighting, kitchen systems, pavers, and wire mesh: readers of SpecSheet certainly have wide-ranging interests. Here are some of the most popular products of the year thus far, as measured by the volume of online traffic.

More after the jump.

The always-superlative Dubai is set to build the world’s first fully functional 3D-printed office building

Architecture, East, Technology
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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(Courtesy Museum of the Future)

(Courtesy Museum of the Future)

What do office buildings and onions have in common? Layers! Dubai is gearing up to 3D-print an entire office building to temporarily house staff of the Museum of the Future. The high-tech structure takes the shape of an elliptical-shaped spectacle engraved with Arabic letters set to open in 2017. Its breathless marketing vaunts the fact that all interior fixtures and furniture will also be 3D-printed.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Glimmering light installation recalls the destroyed baronial towers of Bannerman’s Castle near New York City

Art, East, Lighting, On View, Preservation
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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Photo_by_Rob_Penner-copy

(Rob Penner)

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always—home, …
facing the stars
hope—a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it—together.

—One Day, by Robert Blanco. Written for the second Inauguration of President Barack Obama, January 21, 2013.

Melissa McGill’s light-based public art project, Constellation, arises from the romantic ruins of Bannerman’s Castle on Pollepel Island, a mysterious sight glimpsed from trains heading north 60 miles from New York City just shy of Beacon, and nearby to West Point and Storm King. If you’ve ever wondered about this fleeting apparition, this art installation, which will be up for two years, is the perfect vehicle for visiting the island or gazing from the riverbank.

COntinue reading after the jump.

See this majestic aerial drone footage of Jordan’s breathtaking canyons, ruins, and architectural history

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Travel and lifestyle brand Matador Network released breathtaking footage of an aerial fly-over by drone, offering a soaring bird’s-eye-view of Jordan’s architectural marvels.

Watch the video after the jump.

For the Birds> Michael Graves’ last design for Alessi updated his Bird Kettle with a dragon

Design, International, Product
Monday, August 3, 2015
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9093REXLAZ

(Courtesy Alessi)

The last project Michael Graves completed for Alessi references one of his earliest creations for the company: The 9093 kettle, better known as the Bird Teakettle. To mark the thirtieth anniversary of the iconic piece, the late architect designed a new component for what’s being called the Tea Rex kettle.

In January 2015, Graves explained the development of this update.

More after the jump.

Students at RISD imagine how a climate change museum in New York City could reclaim a vulnerable site

(Courtesy Erin Graham, RISD)

(Courtesy Erin Graham, RISD)

James Hansen, one of the world’s preeminent climate scientists, has issued an alarming new paper about the impacts of climate change—and the findings are way worse than what anyone expected. According to Hansen and the team of 16 scientists he worked with, sea levels could rise up to 10 feet over the next 50 years. “Social disruption and economic consequences of such large sea level rise could be devastating,” conclude the scientists. “It is not difficult to imagine that conflicts arising from forced migrations and economic collapse might make the planet ungovernable, threatening the fabric of civilization.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Open data from Transport for London spurs 3D axonometric plans of the Tube so passengers can mentally map their next trip

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Now you can strategize your next rush-hour skedaddle through the labyrinthine London Underground ahead of time—and choose all the right shortcuts. Transport for London (TfL) has released a series of 3D axonometric maps of the world’s oldest tube network, following a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request by Londoner Georges Vehres.

View the maps after the jump.

IBM Watson launches a “Siri for Cities” app as more tech companies clamor for smart cities where “things” can communicate and supply data

(Courtesy IBM Watson)

(Courtesy IBM Watson)

The IT industry is pushing relentlessly to institutionalize smart cities by installing internet-connected lampposts, digital signage, building facades, and more. IT research and advisory firm Gartner predicts that by 2020, 2.9 billion connected “things” will be in use in the consumer sector.

IBM Watson jas joined the breakneck race with the launch of its “Siri for Cities,” a cognitive computing platform that enables users to ask complex questions about city services. By speaking into their smartphones, laptops or Apple Watches, residents can inquire about fire and police services to parking and waste collection.

Continue reading after the jump.

While Google is photographing your street, its cars will also be mapping the air city dwellers breathe

(Courtesy Aclima)

(Courtesy Aclima)

Will we call it Air View? Google is collaborating with San Francisco–based, pollution-tech start-up Aclima to begin assessing air quality in metropolitan areas across the United States. Cars Google uses to capture its popular Street Views have been equipped with Aclima’s environmental sensors and will be able to detect pollutants such as Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Black Carbon.

Continue reading after the jump.

The roster of cities across the world going car-free is growing, joining Paris, Ireland, and Dublin

Rue de Bon Secours, Brussels (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Rue de Bon Secours, Brussels (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

The concept of car-free city centers is fast spreading throughout Europe as increasingly gridlocked thoroughfares render the private car intolerable. Brussels, Belgium, has announced the development of pedestrian boulevards in its city center—with a ban on cars effective from June 29, 2015—where the city will stage recreational and cultural activities throughout the summer.

And plenty more are following suit.

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