NBBJ’s New Orleans hospital embodies resilience

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NBBJ designed UMC's entry pavilion to recall New Orleans' porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

NBBJ designed UMC’s entry pavilion to recall New Orleans’ porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

High performance and cultural relevance meet in concrete, metal, and steel mesh envelope.

For the stakeholders involved in building the new Rev. Avery C. Alexander Academic Research Hospital (also known as University Medical Center, or UMC) in downtown New Orleans, the project was about much more than replacing facilities damaged during Hurricane Katrina.

Continue reading after the jump.

Exclusive Video> Paddle along with Jeanne Gang as she kayaks the Chicago River

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

If you start at Studio Gang’s acclaimed Aqua Tower and follow the Chicago River about six miles north you will find yourself at another eye-catching building by the increasingly in-demand firm. The WMS Boathouse at Clark Park, completed in 2013, sits along the very polluted north branch of the river and has a dramatic profile inspired by the rhythm of rowers’ oars. (The building is named for the gaming technology company that contributed to the project and has offices directly across the river.)

Watch the video after the jump.

Construction is about to begin on the New York Wheel, the Western Hemisphere’s largest Ferris wheel

Architecture, Development, East
Thursday, September 3, 2015
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The Wheel will provide some spectacular views of Downtown Manhattan. Courtesy New York Wheel

The Wheel will provide some spectacular views of Downtown Manhattan. (Courtesy New York Wheel)

Architecture firm S9, a division of Perkins Eastman, is moving ahead with plans for the New York Wheel, what will soon take shape as an enormous Ferris wheel on the Staten Island waterfront.

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Rafael Viñoly’s car-melting Walkie-Talkie Tower named Britain’s worst building of the year

Architecture, Awards, Newsletter, Other
Thursday, September 3, 2015
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20 Fenchurch Street, known as the 'Walkie-Talkie' seen on the left. (Joshua Brown / Flickr)

20 Fenchurch Street, known as the Walkie-Talkie, seen on the left. (Joshua Brown / Flickr)

After roasting cars and carpets, London’s 20 Fenchurch Street, nicknamed the Walkie-Talkie Tower, has itself been roasted as the winner of the Carbuncle Cup, British architecture’s least desirable award.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quicken’s Dan Gilbert snaps up Detroit’s landmark Book Tower

Detroit's Book Tower and Book Building were recently purchased by Dan Gilbert. (Wayne Hsieh)

Detroit’s Book Tower and Book Building were recently purchased by Dan Gilbert. (Wayne Hsieh / Flickr)

Dan Gilbert, billionaire founder of Quicken Loans and champion of downtown Detroit commercial real estate, last week announced he will buy the long-vacant 38-story Book Tower skyscraper and two other adjacent buildings on Washington Boulevard.

More after the jump.

The New & Old in New Orleans: Ten years after Katrina, architects still figuring out how to rebuild housing in the city

Architecture, Development, Southwest, Urbanism
Thursday, September 3, 2015
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(Courtesy Make It Right Foundation)

(Courtesy Make It Right Foundation)

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina tore through the Gulf Coast region, inundating New Orleans with contaminated floodwaters, the city is in some ways still getting back on its feet. After much dispute on how to recover the city, architects and developers are looking to new construction and existing building stock for solutions.

Continue reading after the jump.

Developer Andrew Frey on aesthetics versus urbanism in Miami’s building codes

2020 Salzedo rental homes in Coral Gables. (Courtesy Andrew Frey / Codina)

2020 Salzedo rental homes in Coral Gables. (Courtesy Andrew Frey / Codina)

When it comes to navigating Miami’s zoning codes, Tecela principal Andrew Frey brings an experience-based advantage to the table. Before transitioning to the business side of development in early 2011, he spent six years as a zoning lawyer. “I always wanted to be a developer, and I learned a lot from my developer clients,” recalled Frey.

Read more after the jump.

From fortress to town square: Los Angeles launches a competition to remake Pershing Square

PERSHING SQUARE AS IT LOOKS NOW. (DAVID A GALVAN / FLICKR)

PERSHING SQUARE AS IT LOOKS NOW. (DAVID A GALVAN / FLICKR)

Ricardo Legorreta’s much maligned design for Pershing Square is getting a makeover. The day after the Los Angeles City Council voted to support a public-private partnership to overhaul the five-acre urban park, councilmember José Huizar and Pershing Square Renew announced an international design competition geared to rethink the open space that now sits ingloriously on top of an underground parking garage.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City is getting serious about future superstorms with $100 million to fund floodwater mitigation

"BIG U" PROPOSED PATH AROUND LOWER MANHATTAN (COURTESY BIG)

“BIG U” PROPOSED PATH AROUND LOWER MANHATTAN (COURTESY BIG)

On August 27th, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and the NYC Office of Resilience & Recovery announced plans to spend $100 million to fortify lower Manhattan against future superstorms. The latest proposal calls for green spaces, levees, and floodwalls to protect the area from East 23rd Street to Montgomery Street, and around the northern tip of Battery Park City.

Continue reading after the jump.

These six groups just got $3 million each for housing, placemaking projects

Cook Inlet Housing Authority: "The heart of our Loussac Place development features a play area for young residents and seating for parents." Courtesy Artplace America

Cook Inlet Housing Authority: “The heart of our Loussac Place development features a play area for young residents and seating for parents.” (Courtesy Artplace America)

President Barack Obama has announced that in tandem with a program by the National Endowment for the ArtsArtPlace America will invest $18 million in six place-based organizations, four of which focus on place-making.

Continue reading after the jump.

Remember the Battery Park City wheatfield? Conceptual artist is back with a horticultural pyramid in Queens

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

The Living Pyramid. (Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

 

[Editor’s Note: Socrates Sculpture Park on the Queens waterfront installed The Living Pyramid, a public sculpture by Agnes Denes in May, when this article was originally published. They have just announced that they will extend the life of the sculpture through the end of October. The work is Denes’ first since her iconic Wheatfield – A Confrontation in 1982, sited on a waterfront landfill in what is now Battery Park City in Lower Manhattan. Do not miss this chance to see this important artwork before it comes down next month.]

Monuments of pre-civilization feats in construction and engineering, pyramids are the latest muse of conceptual artist Agnes Denes who, in 1982, transformed what is now Battery Park City into a two-acre wheatfield.

Continue reading after the jump.

British architects are now deciding which one of these six finalists is the worst building of the year

Architecture, Awards, International
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
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Gary Ullah / Flickr

(Gary Ullah / Flickr)

Six of the worst buildings in Britain, shortlisted by British magazine Building Design, will battle it out to claim British architecture’s least wanted trophy.

View the shortlist after the jump.

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