Norman Foster or Bjarke Ingels, who will be designing the final tower at the World Trade Center?

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster's design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

 

A few weeks ago AN noted that the Norman Foster–designed 2 World Trade Center might finally rise after all these years. The New York Times was reporting that Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation and 21st Century Fox were in talks to lease half the building for a joint headquarters. If it were to happen, wrote the Times, Murdoch’s team might bring in a new architect to update Foster’s design. Now it’s looking like that is exactly what’s going to happen—and it’s going to happen in an, ahem, BIG way.

Continue reading after the jump.

AN Video> Take an exclusive look inside The Beekman, one of the world’s first skyscrapers

5 Beekman. (The Architect's Newspaper)

5 Beekman. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

A few blocks south of City Hall in Manhattan is 5 Beekman—one of New York City’s most intriguing historic landmarks. Behind the building’s brick facade is an ornate, nine-story, glass-pyramid-topped atrium that has been off limits for more than a decade. The Architect’s Newspaper took a behind-the-scenes tour of the building with the architect who is bringing it back to life as a boutique hotel.

Watch the video after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Stiffed! The Lisbon Architecture Triennale tells its curators they won’t be paid

Architecture, International
Monday, April 27, 2015
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"Marshmallow Laser Feast" was part of the Lisbon Architecture Triennale. (Delfino Legnani)

“Marshmallow Laser Feast” was part of the Lisbon Architecture Triennale. (Delfino Legnani)

The life of an independent architecture curator is always tenuous at best. They develop a concept for an exhibit then pitch it to multiple venues in academia and museums and spend three to four years realizing the project. The financial rewards for such projects are minimal, but usually cover the curator’s costs and allow them a modicum of profit.

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SHoP Architects’ twisting skyscraper in Miami includes two acres of glowing digital billboards

SHOP'S MIAMI INNOVATION DISTRICT. (COURTESY SHOP VIA MIAMI HERALD)

SHOP’S MIAMI INNOVATION DISTRICT. (COURTESY SHOP VIA MIAMI HERALD)

Even in a city like Miami, this twisting, LED-emblazoned tower seems a bit over the top. The curious 633-foot structure, called the Miami Innovation Tower, is the work of SHoP Architects, a firm known for adventurous designs, from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to skinny supertall skyscrapers in Manhattan. But even with that reputation, this one takes us by surprise.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> Here’s your first glimpse inside Renzo Piano’s new Whitney Museum

Catwalks on the building's east side offer views of the museum and the surrounding city. (Branden Klayko / AN)

Catwalks on the building’s east side offer views of the museum and the surrounding city. (Branden Klayko / AN)

On May 1, the southern terminus of the High Line will have a true anchor tenant. Renzo Piano‘s towering new Whitney Museum for American Art will throw open its glass doors—or at least unlock the revolving ones—as tourists and eager New Yorkers alike throng in for a look around the highly anticipated gallery spaces. Until then, here’s a peek at the the museum, inside and out, from a press junket on Thursday.

View a gallery of photos after the jump.

Q+A> French artist Vincent Lamouroux turned this Los Angeles building into a stark, white ghost

Art, On View, Q+A, West
Friday, April 24, 2015
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(Elizabeth Daniels)

(Elizabeth Daniels)

Silver Lake’s so-called Bates Motel—it’s actually the soon-to-be-demolished Sunset Pacific Motel—is in the process of getting whitewashed with lime wash as part of French artist Vincent Lamouroux’s installation, Projection. The undertaking, which opens to the public on Sunday and lasts for two weeks, was sponsored and organized by downtown LA gallery Please Do Not Enter. AN West Coast Editor Sam Lubell talked with Lamouroux to get the scoop on his ambitious urban piece.

Continue reading after the jump.

After long wait, Philadelphia’s bikeshare fleet hits the streets

Philly's new bikeshare system. (Courtesy Facebook.com/rideindego)

Philly’s new bikeshare system. (Courtesy Facebook.com/rideindego)

Philadelphia has become the latest American city to offer a bikeshare system with the introduction of Indego. On Thursday, Mayor Nutter celebrated the long-awaited launch by pedaling around town on one of the system’s first 600 bikes. The program will expand significantly over the next two years.

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Plans for 30 miles of protected bike lanes in downtown Minneapolis put bike plans in your city to shame

A bike lane on the University of Minnesota campus. (Dan Reed via Flickr)

A bike lane on the University of Minnesota campus. (Dan Reed via Flickr)

A plan to add 30.7 miles of protected bike lanes to city streets by 2020 goes before Minneapolis City Council this month, potentially bringing the total of dedicated bikeways to 44 miles over the next five years.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Moto Bello: Two dozen classic Italian motorcycles roll into New York City

Art, Design, East, On View, Transportation
Friday, April 24, 2015
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(Courtesy Stuart Parr Collection)

(Courtesy Stuart Parr Collection)

What do you do if you have an array of 26 show-worthy Italian motorcycles? Hopefully what designer, artist manager, and film producer Stuart Parr did. He paired up with real estate magnate Aby Rosen—no stranger to art and relatively fresh off his kerfuffle with the Picasso tapestry, L’Affaire Tricorne. Together they are using an empty space—the ground floor at 285 Madison Avenue—to display the high-design bikes publicly.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Alpine Factory by Barkow Leibinger

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Barkow Leibinger's HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier's concept of the "green factory." (David Franck)

Barkow Leibinger’s HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier’s concept of the “green factory.” (David Franck)

A geometric corrugated metal and glass facade integrates industry and nature.

Barkow Leibinger‘s original scheme for HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren, developed for a competition several years ago, was “a completely crazy origami thing,” recalled partner Frank Barkow. But upon winning the commission and learning that the factory‘s owners wished to build it in a single phase, “we had to be careful not to kill them with the budget,” he said. “We really dumbed it down.”
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Court reverses decision on French architect Jean Nouvel’s lawsuit against the Philharmonie de Paris

Architecture, International, News
Thursday, April 23, 2015
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(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

Celebrated French architect Jean Nouvel lost a court case in which he sued the Philharmonie de Paris for removal of his name from the project due to major deviations from his original design. The court, which ruled in his favor on April 16 pending “additional detailed and comparative information,” reversed its decision hours later.

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