Morphosis Computes a Facade for Cornell

Architecture, East, East Coast, Envelope
Wednesday, December 17, 2014
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Gates Hall's facade features stainless steel panels that mitigate heat loading. (Courtesy Cornell University)

Gates Hall’s facade features perforated stainless steel panels that mitigate heat loading. (Courtesy Cornell University)

The facade’s stainless steel panels form a wave pattern, cutting down on glare and heat loads while representing the contribution computing has made to design.

The recently completed Bill & Melinda Gates Hall at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, combines the schools’ Computing Science and Information Science departments under one roof. Designed by Morphosis, the facility encourages spontaneous interactions between these two disciplines with common spaces for comingling and transparent partitions that allow views, and daylight, to pass from space to space. The building envelope, a unitized glass curtain wall system, is wrapped in a band of perforated stainless steel panels that forms a dynamic, angular wave pattern across the surface. In addition to creating a sense of movement across the exterior, it serves as a fitting symbol of the contribution that computing has had on the arts and sciences: The architects used advanced digital modeling tools to design the geometry, pattern, and details of this additive layer, and made it to function both as an aesthetic gesture as well as a performance enhancing element of the architecture. “The goal was to establish a consistent level of daylighting throughout the interior,” said Cory Brugger, director of design technology at Morphosis. “We maximized the exterior glazing to get the light coming through. The design of the screen reduces the amount of glare and heat gain and starts to help with the performance of the facade system itself.”

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St. Petersburg, Florida flooded with proposals to transform its famous 1970s-era pier

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

About 10 years ago, the city of St. Petersburg, Florida started talking about tearing down one of its most well-known piece of architecture: a 1970s-era, inverted pyramid at the end of a city pier. The city would then replace that pier head with a more modern, but still architecturally significant, statement. So, a few years back, a design competition was launched, and it resulted in some of the most ambitious designs we’ve ever seen from a competition like this.

View the proposals after the jump.

An interactive kaleidoscope of 50 colorful prisms hopes to entice winter exploration in Montreal

Other
Tuesday, December 16, 2014
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Prismatica. (Courtesy James Brittain)

Prismatica. (Courtesy James Brittain)

With 50 pivoting prisms, Toronto-based architecture firm RAW has transformed downtown Montreal into an interactive kaleidoscope. The installation, called Prismatica, is one of two winners selected in the city’s fifth annual Luminothérapie competition. This is the first time that a non-Quebec based firm has won the competition, so congrats to RAW.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Obama Library proposal calls for an enormous park over Chicago’s Eisenhower Expressway

(University of Illinois Chicago)

(University of Illinois Chicago)

A lush green park reaching over the Eisenhower Expressway. Bus rapid transit connections. Economic invigoration for the North Lawndale neighborhood.

Those are some of the visions outlined in the University of Illinois Chicago‘s proposal for the Barack Obama Presidential Library, made public Monday.

Continue reading after the jump.

Larry Scarpa on Los Angeles and the Building Envelope

Center for Manufacturing Innovation, Metalsa CIDeVeC in Apodaca, Nuevo Leon, designed by Brooks + Scarpa. (Courtesy Brooks + Scarpa)

Center for Manufacturing Innovation, Metalsa CIDeVeC in Apodaca, Nuevo Leon, designed by Brooks + Scarpa. (Courtesy Brooks + Scarpa)

With its combination of warm temperatures, low humidity, bright sun, and vulnerability to earthquakes and fires, Southern California presents a unique set of opportunities and challenges to facade designers and builders. “It’s way more forgiving here than in most places,” said Larry Scarpa, principal at Los Angeles-based Brooks + Scarpa. “I’ve been on design reviews in various parts of the country where you have to do things much differently with the building envelope. In Southern California you have a lot of freedom to explore things that you don’t in other parts of the world.” Scarpa and other AEC industry movers and shakers will gather in early February at Facades+ LA to discuss possibilities and trends in building envelope design, both in Los Angeles and beyond.

Continue reading after the jump.

This glowing, beating heart designed in Brooklyn will be in Time Square for Valentine’s Day

Art, Design, East, Newsletter, Unveiled
Tuesday, December 16, 2014
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HEARTBEAT by Stereotank (courtesy Stereotank)

HEARTBEAT by Stereotank (courtesy Stereotank)

A big, red fluttering heart will be aglow in Times Square this coming Valentine’s Day. Brooklyn-based, Venezuelan-born firm, Stereotank, has been named the winner of the 2015 Times Square Valentine Heart Design for its HEARTBEAT sculpture. The firm was invited, among others, to conceive a proposal for a Valentine’s Day–inspired installation, located among the many glimmering lights of the Great White Way. The Times Square Alliance, in partnership with the Architectural League of New York, selected the winning proposal, which will open on February 9th.

More after the jump.

Councilman wants New York City offices to turn their lights off

Lighting, Sustainability, Urbanism
Tuesday, December 16, 2014
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New York City at night. (Flickr / Luke Redmond)

New York City at night. (Flickr / Luke Redmond)

As part of New York City‘s quest to cut carbon emissions by 80 percent by 2050, Queens councilman Donovan Richards has introduced legislation that would force commercial buildings to switch their lights off after their occupants head home.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Product> My Tech: Insightful Apps for Engineers and Architects

National, Product, Spec Sheet, Technology
Tuesday, December 16, 2014
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Spec Sheet  
Lead-penetron

(Courtesy Penetron)

So much to know, and so little time…. Here’s a pocketful of design and construction apps that will put you in control of the facts on concrete calcs and lighting schemes to entry systems and steel data.

Penetron App
Penetron

For Android and iOS mobile devices, this app offers numerous advantages for on-site work. It features instant access to product data sheets (for application instructions) and a solutions guide for a vast number of technical issues. Additional functions include a product overview, a technology summary, a QR scanner for Penetron codes, and a calculator to estimate product quantities needed for a job.

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COOKFOX’s second Pacific Park tower in Brooklyn breaks ground near the Barclays Center

Architecture, Development, East
Monday, December 15, 2014
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535 Carlton. (Courtesy COOKFOX)

535 Carlton. (Courtesy COOKFOX)

This morning, Greenland Forest City Partners broke ground on 535 Carlton Avenue—the second tower to rise at Pacific Park in Brooklyn, the development formerly known as Atlantic Yards. The COOKFOX-designed masonry tower will rise 18 stories and include nearly 300 affordable units: 50 percent middle-income, 20 percent moderate, and 30 percent low-income.

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Custom Fit: 4D Printed Dress Goes to MoMA

Design, Product, Technology
Monday, December 15, 2014
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IMGP3052-Edit,medium.crop.1417364042

(Courtesy Nervous System)

Congratulations to Nervous System, whose Kinematics Dress was just acquired by the Museum of Modern Art (a prescient, pre-emptive move that might keep the curators of the Metropolitan Museum‘s Costume Institute awake for nights to come). While the physical product is certainly a head-turner, it’s the underlying technology that’s the true wonder—and maybe of greater interest and implication to architects.

COntinue reading after the jump.

“UUGGHH”: Mysterious, graffiti-covered New York City landmark likely to go condo

Architecture, Art, East, Preservation
Monday, December 15, 2014
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Screengrab of HOTTEA's work at 190 Bowery. (Screengrab from HOTTEA video)

Screengrab of HOTTEA’s work at 190 Bowery. (Screengrab from HOTTEA video)

A developer has finally gotten his hands on one of Manhattan’s most intriguing and desired properties: 190 Bowery. The six-story Renaissance Revival building opened in 1898 as a branch of the Germania Bank, but had been the private home and workspace of photographer Jay Maisel since 1966. Back then, he bought the building for $102,000 and held onto it for decades as property values skyrocketed in Nolita. For that reason, 190 Bowery has become a beloved, graffiti-covered piece of New York nostalgia, defying gentrification as everything else around it adapted with the times. But that’s about to change.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980

Architecture, Art, Midwest, On View
Monday, December 15, 2014
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(Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago)

(Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago)

The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980
Art Institute Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago
Through January 11th

With its new exhibition, The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980, the Art Institute Chicago explores how the country’s three largest cities transformed in the latter half of the 20th Century. Through photographs and films from the era, this exhibit illuminates significant urban changes through intimate, street-level portraits and studies of city life.

Continue reading after the jump.

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