Big names short-listed for Canadian Canoe Museum project

Artist Neal Broadfoot's conceptual drawing of the canoeseum. (Courtesy Canadian Canoe Museum)

Artist Neal Broadfoot’s conceptual drawing of the canoeseum. (Courtesy Canadian Canoe Museum)

Everyone’s favorite canoe museum, the Canadian Canoe Museum in Ontario, Canada, is expanding. The museum has short-listed six firms to design its new facility at the Peterborough Lift Lock National Historic Site. The canoesuem (our word, not theirs) paddled its way through 90 submissions before settling on the finalists which come from Canada, the United States, and Ireland.

More after the jump.

Plans unveiled for the Red Line Greenway, Cleveland’s answer to The High Line

A rendering of the Red Line Greenway proposal. (Original photo courtesy of Share the River, Rendering by Evan Peterson, LSU Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, via The Cleveland Plain Dealer)

A rendering of the Red Line Greenway proposal. (Original photo courtesy of Share the River, Rendering by Evan Peterson, LSU Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, via The Cleveland Plain Dealer)

A video released last week gives Clevelanders the clearest picture yet of plans for a greenway beside the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority’s Red Line. The idea has drawn comparisons to New York’s High Line or Chicago’s Bloomingdale Trail (aka The 606). Watch the video after the jump.

Viñoly’s latest Manhattan skyscraper will only be half the size of his 432 Park tower, but that’s still really tall

Vinoly's 281 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy Victor Homes via YIMBY)

Vinoly’s 281 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy Victor Homes via YIMBY)

Rafael Viñoly‘s latest Manhattan luxury tower almost seems quaint next to his 1,396-foot-tall, trashcan-inspired 432 Park AvenueNY YIMBY has published renderings of the architect’s 281 Fifth Avenue in NoMad, which is only about half the size of his Park Avenue behemoth.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Watch as these two jetpack-assisted flyers streak over Dubai at blistering speeds

(Courtesy Jetman Dubai)

(Courtesy Jetman Dubai)

The two innovators behind the Jetman Dubai jetpack athlete team recently released a video of them streaking in synchronized flight over the Dubai skyline and surrounding desert—and it brings a completely new perspective to the architecture of the city. Yves Rossy, a professional pilot from Switzerland, and Vince Reffet, a professional skydiver, have spent years perfecting the contraptions for propelled human flight.

Watch the video after the jump.

Watch One World Trade, New York City’s tallest skyscraper, rise in less than two minutes

Other
Tuesday, June 2, 2015
.
One World Trade Center. (AN)

One World Trade Center. (AN)

With the recent opening of One World Trade Center, the folks over at EarthCam have reshared their 2013 timelapse of the tower’s 1,776 foot rise. There’s not too much else to say about the video, other than that it sure makes the building’s very long and arduous climb seem pretty quick and easy. It’s also set to some very Game of Thrones-y music, so it has that going for it too.

Watch the video after the jump.

Product> Gripping Design: Six New Door Handles

Spec Sheet  
LEAD-OMNIA-Prodigy-Designs-copy

(Courtesy Omnia Industries)

Knobs, levers, locks, and handsets: Providing both security and the all-important initial aesthetic impression, decorative door hardware is a key design detail.

Continue reading after the jump.

Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

Is 432 Park really a supertall trashcan? (Montage by AN)

Is 432 Park really a supertall trashcan? (Montage by AN)

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Degradation by design: artist Sam Falls explores how materials change with the passage of time

Design, East
Monday, June 1, 2015
.
(Courtesy James Ewing/Public Art Fund NY)

(Courtesy James Ewing/Public Art Fund NY)

Time and its degenerating aspect came under scrutiny in a public installation by Los Angeles–based artist Sam Falls. Light Over Time casts everyday outdoor objects such as benches, scales, and seesaws in an experiment of the long-term effects of sunlight, rain, and temperature on diverse materials including painted aluminum, heat-sensitive tiles, and colored glass.

Continue reading after the jump.

Peter Marino unveils an unusually restrained High Line condo project

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

In the insane race to build more and more luxury condos in New York City, the High Line is staking its claim as the scrappy younger sibling of Billionaire’s Row on 57th Street. The latest addition will be an 8-unit, 47,000 square-foot building by “the leather daddy of luxury,” Peter Marino.

Continue reading after the jump.

San Francisco’s “Murmur Wall” installation tells your secrets in public

Murmur Wall by Future Cities Lab  (Photo: Peter Prato Photography)

Murmur Wall by Future Cities Lab. (Peter Prato Photography)

We’ve all heard a lot about “smart cities” and “responsive architecture,” by what about architecture that tells secrets? Murmur Wall, designed by Jason Kelly Johnson and Nataly Gattegno of the experimental design practice Future Cities Lab, does just that. The pair describes their site-specific installation at the main entrance to Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco in as “artificially intelligent architecture.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Snøhetta to launch a new office in Copenhagen with sensory architecture exhibit

Snohetta's Norwegian National Opera and Ballet. (Courtesy Snohetta)

Snohetta’s Norwegian National Opera and Ballet. (Courtesy Snohetta)

Snøhetta, the New York and Oslo–based firm named after Norway’s highest mountain range, is opening an office in Copenhagen. The new space opens on June 18th at the Danish Architecture Centre with an exhibit called World Architecture Snøhetta that invites Danes to come meet the firm.

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Renzo Piano’s plans for a subterranean dinosaur park in England unchanged despite funding flop

An early sketch by the architect shows a translucent lid over a limestone quarry in Portland, Dorset. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

An early sketch by the architect shows a translucent lid over a limestone quarry in Portland, Dorset. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

Starchitect Renzo Piano has vowed to soldier on with mega-sized plans for a Jurassica Resort on England’s island of Portland in the English Channel, despite being denied a $24.5 million bid for Heritage Lottery Funding (HLF).

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