Futuristic coffee shop, Voyager Espresso, opens in New York’s Financial District

Architecture, East, Interiors, Open
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Voyager Espresso, ©Michael Vahrenwald / Esto

Voyager Espresso. (Michael Vahrenwald / Esto)

Voyager Espresso, a 550-square-foot coffee bar, brings the perks of artisanal coffee to New York’s perpetually caffeine craving Financial District in the new Fulton Center.

Continue after the jump.

Apple shows love to New York’s historic neighborhoods and the Landmarks Conservancy takes notice

Awards, East, News, Preservation
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Apple store on Fifth Avenue. (Rick González / Flickr)

Apple store on Fifth Avenue. (Rick González / Flickr)

The New York Landmarks Conservancy is honoring Apple with its 2016 Chairman’s Award. The award, to be given at a fundraising luncheon where individual tickets start at $500, honors the company for “their contribution to preserving, restoring, and repurposing notable historic structures in New York City.”

Continue reading after the jump.

The 16th Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Bjarke Ingels, with four accompanying Summer Houses

Architecture, Awards, International, News
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Bjarke Ingels has come a long way since he designed the Denmark Pavilion, pictured above, for the Shanghai Expo 2010. His eponymous Copenhagen- and New York–based firm BIG, the Bjarke Ingels Group, today deals with skyscrapers and other large-scale projects in major cities around the world. But this summer, the firm will take a step back to design the 16th Serpentine Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, London.

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University of Arkansas named inaugural recipient of el dorado prize

Awards, Midwest, News
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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DSC02556_edited

Select students from the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the University of Kansas will have the opportunity to learn el dorado’s work process as summer interns. (Courtesy el dorado)

The University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture & Design will be the inaugural recipient of the annual el dorado Prize. The distinction is sponsored by the Kansas City–based architecture firm el dorado as part of its 20th anniversary.

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William McDonough’s multi-use ICEhouse can be quickly assembled using local materials

ICEhouse in Davos. (Courtesy Brady Johnson, William McDonough + Partners)

ICEhouse in Davos. (Courtesy Brady Johnson, William McDonough + Partners)

Architect William McDonough‘s Innovation for the Circular Economy house (ICEhouse) was a gathering space during the 2016 World Economic Forum. The temporary meeting space was designed to exhibit the “positive design framework described in the book Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, the sustainable development goals of the United Nations, and the reuse of resources implicit in the circular economy.”

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Goldstein, Hill & West Architects designs Long Island City’s tallest tower yet

Architecture, Development, East, News
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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(Courtesy United Construction and Development)

(Courtesy United Construction and Development)

Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (GHWA), in partnership with developer Chris Xu, just unleashed a 79-story residential tower on Long Island City, Queens. At 963 feet tall, the tower will be 305 feet taller than its neighbor, CitiGroup‘s 50-story One Court Square, already one of the tallest buildings in the neighborhood.

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Construction wraps up on Moshe Safdie’s Sky Habitat towers in Singapore

(Courtesy Edward Hendricks, Safdie Architects)

(Courtesy Edward Hendricks, Safdie Architects)

Reaching up into the sky in Bishan, Singapore is Moshe Safdie‘s recently completed development, and aptly named, Sky Habitat. Safdie’s design includes walkways that connect the the two structures up to 38 storey’s up, offering views across the suburban sprawl of Bishan.

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French proposal to pave roads with solar panels could provide power for 5 million people

(Courtesy Joachim Bertrand, COLAS)

(Courtesy Joachim Bertrand, COLAS)

French authorities have announced that it plans to lay over 600 miles of solar roads within five years. Research from a five year study in collaboration with highway company COLAS indicates that the roads could provide power to up to 5 million people, or 8 percent of France’s population. However, some claim that the French government is merely subsidising French companies and not following the best road for alternative energy solutions. Read More

Product> Innovative Wall Coverings

Product, Spec Sheet
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Spec Sheet  
lead_layer

Courtesy Layer Designs

These innovative coverings do not sacrifice quality or efficiency for style. Modular and adaptable acoustic panels allow for a changing environment, and tie-dye inspired wallpapers translate decades old techniques into modern applications.

More after the jump.

Arquitectonica gets real wavy with new seaside tower in Florida

Architecture, East, News, Skyscrapers, Unveiled
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

Arquitectonica tests the surf with ocean-influenced Regalia, a newly unveiled 488-foot-tall luxury condo in Sunny Isles, a city northeast of Miami. But the Florida skyscraper is leaving us with a distinct sense of déjà vu.

More after the jump.

Letter to the Editor> Pier55 responds to City Club of New York criticism

Heatherwick Studio is known for their controversial Pier 55 development, also known as Diller's Island. (Courtesy Heatherwick Studio)

Heatherwick Studio is known for its controversial Pier 55 development. (Courtesy Heatherwick Studio)

[Editor’s Note: This letter is in response to an op-ed from the City Club of New York. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

There is a pressing need for new public open space and programming along the Lower Manhattan waterfront. When Hudson River Park’s Pier 54 closed in 2011, New York City lost vital parkland that had served both local community and citywide residents. The problem was that there was never enough public funding to support a new pier at that site.

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Right on trend, the oldest mall in America is reborn as micro-apartments

Architecture, East, News, Preservation
Monday, February 8, 2016
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(Courtesy Ben Jacobsen / NCA)

(Courtesy Ben Jacobsen / NCA)

Search Twitter for #mallmonday and see a hilariously bleak photo series that profiles different malls, some dead, some impossibly sad, each week. Why are these depressing spaces so popular with architects? By giving new life to these huge, redundant spaces, architects tap into ruinophilia to feed a culturally ingrained desire for dramatic transformation and also temper the excesses of capitalism, maybe.

In the Texas capital, Austin Community College annexed semi-vacant Highland Mall for a new campus, while NBBJ is reviving a dead mall in downtown Columbus.

In Providence, Rhode Island, Northeast Collaborative Architects (NCA) handily combined dead mall revivification with micro-apartments, for an timely transformation of downtown’s Arcade Providence, the oldest shopping mall in the United States.

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