Among thousands of hacked documents from Sony, key emails reveal LACMA’s inner dealings

Architecture, Art, News, West
Thursday, May 21, 2015
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Zumthor's March 2015 revised scheme less fluid and more blocky. Courtesy LACMA/ Atelier Peter Zumthor and Partner.

Zumthor’s March 2015 revised scheme less fluid and more blocky. (Courtesy LACMA/ Atelier Peter Zumthor and Partner)

When hackers broke into Sony Pictures Entertainment’s email server in November 2014 and released stolen messages, the first stories to come out were Hollywood fodder. But buried inside the glut of toxic gossip, star salaries, and Emma Stone’s junior high school pictures are emails that tie together Sony CEO Michael Lynton, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) director Michael Govan, LA County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, and Peter Zumthor’s proposed design for the LACMA campus.

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The Architecture Billings Index heads south in April

BILLINGS (BLUE), INQUIRIES (RED), AND DESIGN CONTRACTS (GREEN) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE), INQUIRIES (RED), AND DESIGN CONTRACTS (GREEN) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) doesn’t want to hear it right now–it knows it’s not in a great place, okay? After the economic index started looking up last month—we’re talking 51.7!—the ABI dropped down to 48.8 in April. And, as we all know, any score below 50 means a decrease in billings. Here’s a silver lining, though: the New Projects Inquiry did scoot up from 58.2 to 60.1.

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Typography & Truth, a conversation with Errol Morris

Design, East, Media
Thursday, May 21, 2015
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(James Way)

(James Way)

Errol Morris took the podium at the Grolier Club, the venerated New York City typography and tome institution, to talk about his 2012 experiment to uncover the influence of a typeface. His experiment ran in the New York Times’ Opinionator column and asked readers whether they were optimists or pessimists, based on the text. However, one small, but key, paragraph was rendered in one of six fonts on different computers (only one of the 45,000 respondents wrote Morris having noticed the difference), and this evaluated whether people believed the passage to be true.

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New York City’s iconic Four Seasons Restaurant inside the Seagram Building is at the center of a renovation dispute

Other
Thursday, May 21, 2015
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Four_Seasons_restaurant

Traditionalists went into a tailspin over proposed modifications to the landmark Four Seasons Restaurant, a gastronomic and architectural emblem of New York City housed in the historic Seagram Building.

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Calatrava says he’s been treated “like a dog,” but hey George Clooney is still a fan

Calatrava's city of arts and sciences seen in Tomorrowland.

Calatrava’s city of arts and sciences seen in Tomorrowland.

Santiago Calatrava really wants you to stop blaming him for the very delayed and very over budget World Trade Center Transit Hub. All of your snark and rude comments have really gotten to him, which he recently revealed to the Wall Street Journal. “It has not been easy for me,” he said“I have been treated like a dog.” But there’s now some good news that should help cheer up the Spanish starchitect: famous person George Clooney is staunchly on his side.

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Sanjeev Tankha explains the intracacies of engineering facades for hot, humid Houston

Houston's sunny climate presents a special set of challenges to facade designers and fabricators. (Theodore Scott / Flickr)

Houston’s sunny climate presents a special set of challenges to facade designers and fabricators. (Theodore Scott / Flickr)

Thanks to the city’s humid subtropical climate, facade designers and fabricators face a special set of challenges in Houston. Unchecked, steady sunshine and high temperatures can permeate the building envelope, leading to a heavy reliance on mechanical cooling systems. Meanwhile, Houston’s Gulf Coast location makes it vulnerable to tropical storms.

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Joseph Wong to design mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr/JWDA)

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr)

Local real estate and investment company Zephyr has named Joseph Wong of Joseph Wong Design Associates (JWDA) lead architect of their 60,000-square-foot mixed-use development planned for downtown San Diego. The Block, as it is currently known (the developer has yet to select a final name), will be the first high-rise, mixed-use project in the city since the recession. With an estimated cost exceeding $250 million, the development promises to be a major player in the demographic and architectural transformation of San Diego’s urban core.

Continue reading after the jump.

BOFFO honors SHoP Architects at its annual Narcissists’ Ball

Architecture, Art, Awards, Design, East
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
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Richard Chai and Snarkitecture, Building Fashion 2010. Image courtesy BOFFO.

Richard Chai and Snarkitecture, Building Fashion 2010. Image courtesy BOFFO.

Monday night in the garden of Nolita’s Elizabeth Street Gallery, the New York–based arts organization BOFFO held its annual Narcissists’ Ball, a Spring benefit in support of art, fashion, and design. SHoP Architects was honored in the “Architecture” category, and Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, gave a speech to acknowledge their work.

Continue reading after the jump.

This Friday, catch the world premiere of “Modern Ruin” all about the New York State Pavilion from the 1964 World’s Fair

Architecture, East, Review
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
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The New York State Pavilion. (Marco-Catini)

The New York State Pavilion. (Marco-Catini)

World Premiere of Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion
Friday, May 22nd, 2015
Cocktails 7:00–8:00p.m., Screening 8:00–9:30p.m.
Queens Theatre, 14 United Nations Avenue South
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens

Philip Johnson and Lev Zetlin’s New York State Pavilion for the 1964 World’s Fair in Queens’ Flushing Meadows Corona Park should be more than an eyebrow raiser as those curious, disc-on-pole structures seen when driving to JFK airport. It was Munchkinland, the starting place for Dorothy’s journey to Manhattan—correction, Oz—in the 1978 film The Wiz. It was an alien spacecraft tower in the original 1997 Men in Black which crashes into the nearby Unisphere. And it was the site of Tony Stark/Ironman’s confrontation with his adversaries in Iron Man 2 on the grounds of Stark Expo 2010, a digitally updated 1964 World’s Fair grounds (director Jon Favreau’s childhood home overlooked the park). And it will appear in the new film Tomorrowland starring George Clooney that opens May 22.

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As Facebook taps Gehry for two more buildings, take a peek inside the tech giant’s new Menlo Park offices

Architecture, Interiors, West
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
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Facebook HQ (Chrisophe Wu/ Facebook)

Facebook HQ (Chrisophe Wu / Facebook)

Facebook has allowed precious few people to see its new Frank Gehry–designed headquarters in Menlo Park, California.

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Sasaki Associates proposes a community-friendly Boston City Hall Plaza buzzing with cultural activities

(Courtesy Sasaki Associates)

(Courtesy Sasaki Associates)

Requests, complaints, and even full-fledged proposals came flooding in after Mayor Marty Walsh issued a Request for Information (RFI) in January for the redesign of Boston City Hall Plaza. Four months and nearly 1000 tweets later, plans to launch a complete assail on the eight-acre eyesore of red brick and concrete are beginning to consolidate.

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Detroit gets its feet wet with “blue infrastructure”

Downtown Detroit, as seen from the Detroit Riverwalk in 2012. (Kevin Chang via Flickr)

Downtown Detroit, as seen from the Detroit Riverwalk in 2012. (Kevin Chang via Flickr)

Detroit‘s Water & Sewerage Department hopes an experiment in so-called blue infrastructure will help the cash-strapped city stop flushing money down the drain.

Continue reading after the jump.

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