Boston’s ICA looking to expand out from its Diller Scofidio + Renfro home

Architecture, Art, East
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
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ICA Boston. (Flickr / Alun K. Wu)

ICA Boston. (Flickr / Alun K. Wu)

Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) is apparently getting a little too big for its Diller Scofidio + Renfro–designed home along the Boston Harbor.

Continue reading after the jump.

Scandalous no more: The Watergate Hotel post-$125 million renovation looks more classy and elegant than ever

Other
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
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(Courtesy The Watergate Hotel)

(Courtesy The Watergate Hotel)

As Washington, D.C.’s first “unapologetically luxurious” stomping ground for the rich and famous, The Watergate Hotel recently underwent a $125 million modernizing facelift. Inextricably connected with the Watergate scandal, the hotel has maintained its avant-garde design and curvaceous, classic elegance in a nod to its 1960s design by Italian architect Luigi Moretti.

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3D projection technology fleetingly brings back the Bamiyan Buddha that was destroyed by the Taliban

Art, International, Preservation
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
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(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Before and after (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

The hollow in the sandstone cliffs of Bamiyan, central Afghanistan, still harks back to the looming Bamiyan Buddha statues that once emerged from the cliff-face, before they were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001. A Chinese couple has created 3D projection technology to holographically recreate the destroyed statues which, standing at 180 feet and 120 feet respectively, lorded over the Bamiyan valley for 1500 years.

See the projection after the jump.

Plans emerge for the world’s first electricity-generating tidal lagoon—and it will cost a hefty $1.5 billion

(Courtesy FaulknerBrowns)

(Courtesy FaulknerBrowns Architects)

UK developer Tidal Lagoon Power has lodged a proposal to create the world’s first electricity-generating tidal lagoon. Demanding a budget of over $1.5 billion, the Swansea Tidal Lagoon is slated to generate clean, renewable energy for 155,000 homes for up to 120 years.

More after the jump.

Richard Rogers to lead parliamentary inquiry into how design of the built environment affects behavior

(Courtesy Rogers Stirk Harbor + Partners)

(Courtesy Rogers Stirk Harbor + Partners)

Riding on a wave of psychographic research indicating positive correlations between productivity and the work environment, architect Richard Rogers has launched an ambitious parliamentary inquiry into how design overall affects behavior.

The founder of Rogers Stirk Harbor + Partners kicked off the eight-month Design Commission inquiry this June before the Houses of Parliament in London. The cross-party investigation led by Rogers will explore how design in planning of the built environment creates a tendency towards positive behaviors within local communities. The inquiry was lodged the same week as newly-released research which supports the long-held view that cities which promote physical activity benefit from economic productivity gains.

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Broken umbrellas and bicycle wheels get a second life in these two, completely recyclable pavilions on Governors Island

(Courtesy Izaskun Chinchilla Architects)

(Courtesy Izaskun Chinchilla Architects)

Two whimsical summer pavilions on New York City’s Governors Island have been slated for reuse elsewhere, themselves built from recycled and repurposed materials.

The Billion Oyster Pavilion by BanG Studio and the Organic Growth Pavilion by Izaskun Chinchilla Architects both tied as winners in the annual City of Dreams design competition, and the jury, torn between the two, greenlighted both pavilions, launching a dedicated Kickstarter campaign to crowdfund their construction.

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Product> Windows, Walls, and Doors for Spatial Solutions

National, Product, Spec Sheet
Tuesday, June 30, 2015
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Spec Sheet  
LEAD-Maars-lineaCube-3

(Courtesy Maars Living Walls)

Inside or out, these six systems encourage spatial efficiency in both commercial and residential settings. Innately flexible, their design allows square footage to respond to the changing demands of the user.

More after the jump.

DDG is set to begin construction on this razor-edged, triangular building in Tribeca

100 Franklin Street. (Courtesy DDG Partners)

100 Franklin Street. (Courtesy DDG)

Two very narrow parking lots in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood will soon be filled in with a pair of very narrow condo buildings designed and developed by DDG. The firm’s plan for 100 Franklin Street was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in early 2014, but only recently made it through the Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA) which had to grant a zoning variance for the site.

More after the jump.

Portland foodies rejoice: Snøhetta is designing the planned James Beard Public Market

The James Beard Public Market by Snøhetta,  with local partners, Mayer/Reed, SERA Architects, Studio Jeffreys and Interface Engineering, hopes to transform Downtown Portland into a culinary hub. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

The James Beard Public Market by Snøhetta, with local partners, Mayer/Reed, SERA Architects, Studio Jeffreys and Interface Engineering, hopes to transform Downtown Portland into a culinary hub. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

It seems that almost every major West Coast city has a public market. Seattle has Pike Place Market (construction is underway on an upcoming expansion now set to open in 2016), San Francisco has the Ferry Building Marketplace, Los Angeles has Grand Central Market, and Vancouver has Granville Island. And San Diego may get a public market in Point Loma this summer.

But the city of Portland—the small but mighty West coast food hub chock full of inventive restaurants, abundant farmers’ markets, and food trucks—has gone without a public market since the Portland Public Market closed in 1942. Until now.

Continue reading after the jump.

Flood prevention scheme in the Netherlands creates unique byproduct: an urban river park island

(Courtesy Room for the River Waal)

(Courtesy Room for the River Waal)

After a close shave with nature 20 years ago, the Netherlands has sought to reinvent defensive flood prevention. “Room for the Waal” is an anti-flood program in Nijmegen, a city which spans the River Waal, Europe’s busiest waterway, where a sharp turn forms a bottleneck as it nears the city.

Continue reading after the jump.

Be the one to restore Stamford’s fish-shaped First Presbyterian Church

(Courtesy First Presbyterian Church)

(Courtesy First Presbyterian Church)

Design professionals are being sought for a consulting role to provide a conditions assessment of the historic First Presbyterian Church complex in Stamford, Connecticut. As part of a multi-year campaign to repair, conserve, restore, and upgrade the complex, the selected team will be expected to complete an architectural analysis of the current conditions of the building and provide recommendations for its rehabilitation and restoration as part of Phase I.

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New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex stacks up in just one month

Carmel Place. (Courtesy Field Condition)

Carmel Place. (Courtesy Field Condition)

It took just about one month to fully stack New York City‘s first modular, micro-unit housing complex. The nARCHITECTS-designed building, known as Carmel Place is located on Manhattan’s East Side and offers 55 apartments that range between 260 and 360 square feet. You might remember that the project won Michael Bloomberg‘s adAPT NYC Competition back in 2013.

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