Broken umbrellas and bicycle wheels get a second life in these two, completely recyclable pavilions on Governors Island

(Courtesy Izaskun Chinchilla Architects)

(Courtesy Izaskun Chinchilla Architects)

Two whimsical summer pavilions on New York City’s Governors Island have been slated for reuse elsewhere, themselves built from recycled and repurposed materials.

The Billion Oyster Pavilion by BanG Studio and the Organic Growth Pavilion by Izaskun Chinchilla Architects both tied as winners in the annual City of Dreams design competition, and the jury, torn between the two, greenlighted both pavilions, launching a dedicated Kickstarter campaign to crowdfund their construction.

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Product> Windows, Walls, and Doors for Spatial Solutions

Spec Sheet  
LEAD-Maars-lineaCube-3

(Courtesy Maars Living Walls)

Inside or out, these six systems encourage spatial efficiency in both commercial and residential settings. Innately flexible, their design allows square footage to respond to the changing demands of the user.

lineaCube

Maars Living Walls

Occupants of open-plan offices not infrequently yearn for the visual and acoustic shielding afforded by conventional, closed-office systems. The lineaCube offers acoustic privacy as well as a fully responsive working climate. In addition to completely transparent walls, combinations with blinds, privacy glass, and opaque walls are also possible. The minimalist design of the unit is facilitated by its completely self-supporting structure with recessed ceiling and double glazing. The lineaCube is an independent space with its own ventilation, acoustic insulation and absorption, with power, data, audio, and lighting integrated into the ceiling.

 

1-JELD_WEN--Black-3-Panel-Lambert-Open-Wide-EB-copy

(Courtesy Jeld-Wen)

W-4500 Clad Wood Folding Patio Doors

Jeld-Wen

This door supplies plenty of design flexibility. It is available in a wide range of configurations and sizes, grille and glass treatments, and interior and exterior cladding options. Uses floor-supported hardware.

 

2-TUDELU-Office-copy

(Courtesy Tudelü)

Retractable Walls

Tudelü

These vertically-retractable walls are operated by remote control and take less than a minute to go up or down. Offering differing levels of visual and acoustic privacy, the walls are available in felt, woven fabrics, wood, steel mesh, and vinyl. Available in both indoor- and outdoor-rated models.

 

3-WEATHERSHIELD_CC_BFLD_DOOR_EXT-copy

(Courtesy Weather Shield)

Contemporary Collection

Weather Shield

This suite of windows and doors features narrow profile frames and sleek European-style hardware, a contemporary square glazing bead, and interior and exterior finishes complementary to today’s modern homes, such as jet black, metallic, or anodized exterior cladding and polyurethane interiors.

 

4-brombal-at-tanglewood

(Courtesy Brombal)

Brombal

Brombal USA

The aesthetic options offered by this manufacturer include both wood and steel materials, more than a dozen color finishes—from stainless steel to nickel to Cor-ten steel—and unlimited shapes and sizes. The products have a NFRC rating based on their true thermally-broken construction and an impact rating for use in hurricane-prone areas. Steel products have a ten-year warranty.

 

6-skyFrame-copy

(Courtesy Sky-Frame)

Classic

Sky-Frame

The sliding windows comprise insulating glass units with perimeter aluminum or glass-fiber-reinforced plastic sections. Mounted in aluminum frames that are fitted flush with floor and ceiling, the sliding units offer minimum rolling resistance when operated. The system drainage for the flush assembly is via recessed channel or is installed below the raised outdoor floor covering.

DDG Partners is set to begin construction on this razor-edged, triangular building in Tribeca

100 Franklin Street. (Courtesy DDG Partners)

100 Franklin Street. (Courtesy DDG Partners)

Two very narrow parking lots in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood will soon be filled in with a pair of very narrow condo buildings designed and developed by DDG Partners. The firm’s plan for 100 Franklin Street was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in early 2014, but only recently made it through the Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA) which had to grant a zoning variance for the site.

More after the jump.

Portland foodies rejoice: Snøhetta is designing the planned James Beard Public Market

The James Beard Public Market by Snøhetta,  with local partners, Mayer/Reed, SERA Architects, Studio Jeffreys and Interface Engineering, hopes to transform Downtown Portland into a culinary hub. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

The James Beard Public Market by Snøhetta, with local partners, Mayer/Reed, SERA Architects, Studio Jeffreys and Interface Engineering, hopes to transform Downtown Portland into a culinary hub. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

It seems that almost every major West Coast city has a public market. Seattle has Pike Place Market (construction is underway on an upcoming expansion now set to open in 2016), San Francisco has the Ferry Building Marketplace, Los Angeles has Grand Central Market, and Vancouver has Granville Island. And San Diego may get a public market in Point Loma this summer.

But the city of Portland—the small but mighty West coast food hub chock full of inventive restaurants, abundant farmers’ markets, and food trucks—has gone without a public market since the Portland Public Market closed in 1942. Until now.

Continue reading after the jump.

Flood prevention scheme in the Netherlands creates unique byproduct: an urban river park island

(Courtesy Room for the River Waal)

(Courtesy Room for the River Waal)

After a close shave with nature 20 years ago, the Netherlands has sought to reinvent defensive flood prevention. “Room for the Waal” is an anti-flood program in Nijmegen, a city which spans the River Waal, Europe’s busiest waterway, where a sharp turn forms a bottleneck as it nears the city.

Continue reading after the jump.

Be the one to restore Stamford’s fish-shaped First Presbyterian Church

(Courtesy First Presbyterian Church)

(Courtesy First Presbyterian Church)

Design professionals are being sought for a consulting role to provide a conditions assessment of the historic First Presbyterian Church complex in Stamford, Connecticut. As part of a multi-year campaign to repair, conserve, restore, and upgrade the complex, the selected team will be expected to complete an architectural analysis of the current conditions of the building and provide recommendations for its rehabilitation and restoration as part of Phase I.

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New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex stacks up in just one month

Carmel Place. (Courtesy Field Condition)

Carmel Place. (Courtesy Field Condition)

It took just about one month to fully stack New York City‘s first modular, micro-unit housing complex. The nARCHITECTS-designed building, known as Carmel Place is located on Manhattan’s East Side and offers 55 apartments that range between 260 and 360 square feet. You might remember that the project won Michael Bloomberg‘s adAPT NYC Competition back in 2013.

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ON VIEW> Grimanesa Amorós sketches lines on water

Art, Lighting, On View, West
Monday, June 29, 2015
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Golden Waters, Grimanesa Amoró's light installation on Soleri Bridge. (Courtesy  Grimanesa Amorós)

Golden Waters, Grimanesa Amorós’ light installation on Soleri Bridge. (Courtesy Grimanesa Amorós)

In 2010, at 91, architect and Arcosanti founder Paolo Soleri saw the opening of the Soleri Bridge in Scottsdale, Arizona. The cable-stay pedestrian crossing was the culmination of 60 years of bridge sketches and drawings. Peruvian artist Grimanesa Amorós continues Soleri’s dedication to experimentation with Golden Waters, an art installation extending from the bridge into the Arizona canal. Read More

New facade peels away from building, and comes with interactive mobile app to boot

(Courtesy Bortolotto architects)

(Courtesy Bortolotto architects)

A digitally readable facade will grace the southeast corner of a building at the Ontario College of Art & Design (OCAD U).

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Making it look easy: Snøhetta posts time-lapse video of SF MoMA’s two-year expansion

Architecture, West
Monday, June 29, 2015
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(Courtesy Snøhetta)

(Courtesy Snøhetta)

If constructing a museum were this effortless, there might be one on nearly every street corner. Norway-based firm Snøhetta recently posted a time-lapse video of the ongoing expansion of SF MoMA, compressing a two-year effort into a roughly 7-second breeze-through akin to folding origami: “2 years of construction over in the blink of an eye—time flies when you’re having fun and we can’t wait for Spring 2016!” The caption on the Instagram video reads.

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Getty Foundation Announces its 2015 Keeping it Modern Grant Recipients

Saint John’s Abbey and University Church, Marcel Breuer, 1961, Collegeville, Minnesota. (Courtesy Fr. Geoffrey Fecht, OSB)

Saint John’s Abbey and University Church, Marcel Breuer, 1961, Collegeville, Minnesota. (Courtesy Fr. Geoffrey Fecht, OSB)

Funding shortages, insufficient knowledge of materials and technology, and conflicting interests are often the hurdles that preservationists face in the fight to save 20th century modernist landmarks. In recent years we’ve lost Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago and Neutra’s Cyclorama at Gettysburg to demolition, and soon Paul Rudolph’s Government Center in Goshen will likely meet the same sad fate. The Getty Foundation, however, is taking steps to protect other significant buildings of this period through its second annual Keeping it Modern grant initiative, totaling $1.75 million.

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Renzo Piano’s globe gets go-ahead from LA City Council

Architecture, West
Friday, June 26, 2015
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Los Angeles City Council Approves Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Project. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop/ Studio Pali Fekete architects/A.M.P.A.S.)

Los Angeles City Council Approves Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Project. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop/ Studio Pali Fekete architects/A.M.P.A.S.)

And… action. In a unanimous vote the LA City Council approved Renzo Piano’s plans for the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. The design, which includes a renovation of the AC Martin’s May Company Building on Wilshire and Fairfax avenues and the eye-popping addition of a 140-foot-diameter glass and steel globe sited behind the existing 1939 building, comes with at $300 million estimated construction cost and hopes to open in 2017. Read More

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