AN’s 2016 Facades+ conference series kicks off in Los Angeles

Brought to you with support from:
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Enrique Norten (AN)

Enrique Norten (AN)

“We don’t need walls anymore.  We need living, breathing systems that provide so much more to the urban realm than keeping in conditioned air and keeping out noise and pollutants.” – Will Wright, AIA|LA

Los Angeles’ 2016 Facades+ Conference, presented by The Architect’s Newspaper, is the 18th event in an ongoing series of conferences and forums that have unfolded in cities across the nation, including New York City, Miami, San Francisco, Dallas, Houston, Seattle, D.C., and Chicago. Held at the L.A. Hotel Downtown, the conference incorporated architects, engineers, fabricators, and innovative material manufacturers into a multidisciplinary two-day event covering the state of building envelope design thinking today.
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Someday soon, virtual reality could let you get in the game… in your living room

Design, National, Technology
Thursday, February 4, 2016
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(Courtesy Microsoft)

(Courtesy Microsoft)

This year’s 50th Super Bowl could be extra special to those who can somehow get their hands on Microsoft’s HoloLens. Though not yet available to the public, the tech giant has unveiled an NFL-based concept that would bring the players and the stadium into your living and even onto your coffee table.

The future after the click.

Anything but boring: World’s largest tunnelling machine, Big Bertha, is stuck under Seattle, Tweets an interview

A close-up view of Bertha’s cutterhead. Flickr / WSDOT CC BY 2.0

A close-up view of Bertha’s cutterhead. (Flickr / WSDOT)

Big Bertha, Seattle’s famous tunnel boring machine, is stuck underground again. Bertha was running for just under a month following a two year delay to fix a broken cutter head. And the machine has taken to Twitter, as we imagine it can get lonely so far beneath the city.

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Tehran’s Next Office designs a house that swivels in and out on enormous turntables

Sharifi-ha House in motion. (Courtesy Next Office)

Sharifi-ha House in motion. (Courtesy Next Office)

Sharifi-Ha House, designed by Tehran-based firm Next Office, comprises three pods on turntables to respond to changing seasons and functions. German turntable manufacturer, Bumat, modeled the technology after its industry-leading platforms for theater sets and car exhibitions.

The architecture firm explained, “The sensational, spatial qualities of the interiors, as well as the formal configuration of its exterior, directly respond to the displacement of turning boxes that lead the building volume to become open or closed, obtaining introverted or extroverted character.”

More after the jump.

Philips unveils innovative lighting system at Clemson University

East, Interiors, Lighting, Product, Technology
Tuesday, January 26, 2016
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Watt_038

Courtesy Philips

In the first installation of it’s kind on a college campus, Philips has unveiled a large-scale lighting project that leverages a Power over Ethernet (PoE) system combined with LED lighting to improve energy efficiency. The system, installed on Clemson University’s South Carolina campus, will deliver up to 70 percent in energy savings.

Continue after the jump.

Facades pro Hagy Belzberg to architects: bring engineers on board sooner

Belzberg Architects' Gores Group Headquarters remodel. (Bruce Damonte)

Belzberg Architects’ Gores Group Headquarters remodel. (Bruce Damonte)

Architects have long relied on engineers to help execute formally or functionally complex concepts. But, as Belzberg Architects founder Hagy Belzberg points out, “architects usually work out a schematic design” in response to a client’s needs, “only later to invite the engineer to help substantiate their idea.”

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The Future is Now: Here’s what caught our eye at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show

National, Product, Technology
Monday, January 18, 2016
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CES

(Courtesy CES)

This month’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) brought more than 170,000 attendees to visit over 3,600 exhibitors. Navigating a sea of similar tech products may seem overwhelming, but there are a few products to note within the realms of smart home technology, 3D printing, and electronics to improve one’s health.

More after the jump.

Seismic hot spots and facade design: Experts explain the risks and rewards

Aftermath of a 1994 earthquake. (David Butow/Corbis via Flickr)

Aftermath of a 1994 earthquake. (David Butow/Corbis via Flickr)

Southern California‘s enviable climate and landscape—sunny skies, balmy temperatures, picturesque mountains, and surfer-friendly beaches—come at a geological cost: proximity to active earthquake faults.

More after the jump.

All you need to know about Building Enclosure Commissioning: Stevan Vinci on adding value with BECx

Building envelope testing. (Courtesy Stevan Vinci)

Building envelope testing. (Courtesy Stevan Vinci)

As Morrison Hershfield‘s Building Enclosure Commissioning Practice Lead, principal Stevan Vinci hears one question again and again: “The design team has an envelope consultant. What’s the point of having a BECx authority on project?”

More after the jump.

Architects turn to the sea with real proposals for subaquatic living

FLOATING CITY BY AT DESIGN. (COURTESY AT DESIGN)

FLOATING CITY BY AT DESIGN. (COURTESY AT DESIGN)

Sub-aquatic colonization is as alien as inhabiting Mars, yet both topics trend in the design world. Some designers believe residing in the deep sea would resolve crises over food, energy, water, and carbon dioxide. Here are six proposals for subaquatic cities, some of which are being realized, despite resembling post-apocalyptic films.

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Eric Owen Moss explores the origins of innovation in architecture

Pterodactyl by Eric Owen Moss Architects. (Tom Bonner)

Pterodactyl by Eric Owen Moss Architects (Courtesy Tom Bonner)

Eric Owen Moss, principal and lead designer of Eric Owen Moss Architects, has spent decades in the metaphorical trenches of architectural practice. But when he speaks about truly innovative design, he harkens back to the literal trenches of World War I, where German architect Erich Mendelsohn sketched his Einstein Tower, later built in Potsdam. “Mendelsohn was drawing something that no one else was drawing,” explains Moss, who will deliver the afternoon keynote address at the upcoming Facades+ LA conference. “It was unique to him and his time and place.” Read More

Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter shares lessons learned through teaching architecture

Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter served as consultant on DoSu Studio Architecture's Bloom, M&A Gallery. Doris Sung, Principal; Matthew Melnyk, structural engineer. (Brandon Shigeta)

Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter served as consultant on DoSu Studio Architecture’s Bloom, M&A Gallery. Doris Sung, Principal; Matthew Melnyk, structural engineer. (Brandon Shigeta)

For Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter, associate dean at Woodbury University School of Architecture, director of  WUHO Gallery, and co-founder of [WROAD], architectural practice and education are inextricably intertwined.

Continue after the jump.

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