ODA reveals Eliot Spitzer–developed stack of boxes in Williamsburg inspired by icebergs

(Courtesy ODA)

(Courtesy ODA)

Stacked boxes are all the architectural rage these days—from Bjarke Ingels’ Two World Trade, to ODA’s Midtown skyscraper, to ODA’s Financial District skyscraper, to ODA’s Bushwick residential project, to ODA’s Williamsburg condos, to ODA’s other boxy buildings in Long Island City, Harlem, and the Lower East Side. It should surprise nobody, then, that ODA‘s latest project will stay true to the firm’s trademark form.

Continue reading after the jump.

Ole Scheeren wants to transform Vancouver’s glass skyline with this cantilevering tower

(Courtesy Buro-OS)

(Courtesy Buro-OS)

If you took Herzog & de Meuron‘s so-called “Jenga Tower” in New York City and combined it with NBBJ‘s so-called “Jenga Tower” in Cleveland, you would have something resembling Büro Ole Scheerens proposed residential tower in Vancouver, which, sure, kind of looks like a game of Jenga.

Continue reading after the jump.

With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

MVRDV Proposes A Tower of Life-Size Stacked “Building” Blocks

International
Tuesday, November 20, 2012
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Lower base of structure from the ground (Courtesy MVRDV)

Lower base of structure from the ground (Courtesy MVRDV)

Dutch architecture office MVRDV has placed a bid to create a 1,300-foot-tall skyscraper in Jakarta, Indonesia called Peruri 88. The complex arrangement of edifices, which resembles a city’s worth of buildings stacked atop one another along the lines of a massive assembly of life-size “building” blocks covered with greenery, is MVRDV’s answer to Jakarta’s need for densification and green space.

Continue reading after the jump.

Getting Boxy in Chicago’s South Loop.  Getting Boxy in Chicago's South Loop Chicago’s South Loop skyline may be getting a new bobble in the form of a boxy rental residential tower across from the Roosevelt University vertical campus. Designed by Lothan Van Hook DeStefano Architecture, the black boxes cantilever over the edge of the one below, creating a cubic counterpoint to Roosevelt’s zig zag. Many of these stacked box schemes—including a project in Jersey City by OMA and the dead Museum Plaza by REX in Louisville—have never made it off the drawing board, so it will be interesting to see if the locals can pull it off.

 

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