Jaklitsch/Gardner’s Three-Part Ode to Tokyo

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects' flagship Tokyo store for Marc Jacobs features a lantern-like, non-occupiable top story sheathed in punched aluminum. (Liao Yusheng)

Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects’ flagship Tokyo store for Marc Jacobs features a lantern-like, non-occupiable top story sheathed in punched aluminum. (Liao Yusheng)

Marc Jacobs flagship store features a tripartite facade of aluminum, tile, and glass.

Commissioned to design Marc Jacobs‘ flagship Tokyo store, Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects‘ first order of business was to rectify the desire for an iconic urban presence with strict local regulations. To make the 2,800-square-meter shop more visible from nearby Omotesando Street, the architects took advantage of a loophole in the building code that allowed them to double the height of the structure as long as the top half was not occupiable. The catch was that the code required a 500-millimeter gap between the occupiable and non-occupiable spaces. “Our first strategy was to create a louvered facade system that would disguise [the divide],” recalled principal Stephan Jaklitsch. But after an afternoon walk through the Imperial gardens, they reversed course. “We were inspired by the vernacular architecture,” said project architect Jonathan Kirk. “We wanted to somehow utilize the language of proportions, but also the materiality within that experience. Rather than trying to create something that was monolithic, we began to look at different materials for each of the building’s components.” The result, called Tōrō Ishi Ku (lantern-rock-void), makes its mark on the city with a tripartite facade in punched aluminum, bespoke tile, and glass.
Read More

Pictorial> Marc Jacobs Builds a Lantern in Tokyo

International
Tuesday, January 25, 2011
.
Marc Jacobs flagship Tokyo store by Stephan Jaklitsch Architects (Liao Yusheng)

Marc Jacobs flagship Tokyo store by Stephan Jaklitsch Architects (Liao Yusheng)

New York firm Stephan Jaklitsch Architects (SJA) has completed the latest jewel box on Tokyo‘s premiere shopping street, the Omotesando-dori in the Aoyama shopping district. The richly textured Marc Jacobs flagship store is comprised of three masses each of glass, stone, and perforated metal, the latter two appearing to float above the sidewalk.

Check out more info and a photo gallery after the jump.

Pratt Is Back

East
Thursday, October 29, 2009
.
Pratt

Pratt designer-alumni have furnished this Rogers Marvel-designed townhouse in Carroll Gardens.

Pratt Institute was founded in 1886 by Charles Pratt, who had sold his family’s Astral Oil works to Standard Oil in 1874. It was Pratt’s original intention that the school train industrial workers for the changing economy of the 19th century, and this it did for many years before growing into one of the leading art and design schools in the country. Read More

Not Exactly Glass Slippers…

Other
Tuesday, February 24, 2009
.

(Images courtesy Kartell)

Reminiscent of the ever-so-popular jelly shoes of the 1980s, and more recent incarnations such as Marc Jacobs Rubber Ballet Flat Shoes which debuted in 2007, Italian furniture powerhouse Kartell, internationally renowned for modern furniture design in plastics, and young Italian fashion label .normaluisa recently released a shoe collection of plastic ballerina flats aptly called “Glue Cinderella.” Combining Kartell’s innovative technology with .normaluisa’s youthful design sensibility their latest collaboration offers classic style with an edgy vibe. Read More

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License