With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

After years of delays, BKSK is set to revive this half-built luxury tower in New York’s artsy Noho district

(Courtesy BKSK)

(Courtesy BKSK)

With some financial maneuvering, the long-delayed construction site at 22 Bond Street in NoHo will finally see some action. For years, a 14-story super structure has been lurking at the coveted corner as a blatant reminder of a hotel project that went south. Now, with some refinancing, BKSK Architects will adapt the existing skeleton into an 11-story, block-through condo building.

Continue reading after the jump.

After redesigning Times Square, Snøhetta takes on crowded blocks around Penn Station

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

The frustratingly congested, obnoxiously loud, and aggressively dirty area around Penn Station is easily the worst part of Manhattan. It is the reason why tourists qualify their vacation stories about New York with “but I could never live there.” Turning the dreadful area around the station (let’s leave the hated station out of it for now) into a pleasant place where people want to spend time and not just push and shove their way through is a Herculean task, but one that Snøhetta has agreed to take on.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Frick Collection cancels controversial expansion plan by Davis Brody Bond

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond.)

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond)

The Frick Collection has called off its controversial expansion plan, reports the New York Times. The surprising news comes one year after the museum unveiled a scheme by David Brody Bond to build a six-story addition and fill in its beloved Russell Page Garden. Removing the garden (and replacing it with a new rooftop garden) did not sit well with preservationists who came out swinging against the expansion.

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Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

Viñoly’s latest Manhattan skyscraper will only be half the size of his 432 Park tower, but that’s still really tall

Vinoly's 281 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy Victor Homes via YIMBY)

Vinoly’s 281 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy Victor Homes via YIMBY)

Rafael Viñoly‘s latest Manhattan luxury tower almost seems quaint next to his 1,396-foot-tall, trashcan-inspired 432 Park AvenueNY YIMBY has published renderings of the architect’s 281 Fifth Avenue in NoMad, which is only about half the size of his Park Avenue behemoth.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Watch One World Trade, New York City’s tallest skyscraper, rise in less than two minutes

One World Trade Center. (AN)

One World Trade Center. (AN)

With the recent opening of One World Trade Center, the folks over at EarthCam have reshared their 2013 timelapse of the tower’s 1,776 foot rise. There’s not too much else to say about the video, other than that it sure makes the building’s very long and arduous climb seem pretty quick and easy. It’s also set to some very Game of Thrones-y music, so it has that going for it too.

Watch the video after the jump.

Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

Is 432 Park really a supertall trashcan? (Montage by AN)

Is 432 Park really a supertall trashcan? (Montage by AN)

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Peter Marino unveils an unusually restrained High Line condo project

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

In the insane race to build more and more luxury condos in New York City, the High Line is staking its claim as the scrappy younger sibling of Billionaire’s Row on 57th Street. The latest addition will be an 8-unit, 47,000 square-foot building by “the leather daddy of luxury,” Peter Marino.

Continue reading after the jump.

This stack of shipping containers by LOT-EK could become the nomadic coworking office of the future

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

The future of the mobile office is on its way, and it’s blurring the lines between the home and the workplace. Spacious is the name of a “coworking hotel” concept being touted by its founder and CEO, Preston Pesek, as the future of the workplace, combining a traditional coworking space, a hotel, and retail into a giant live, work, play experience. And what better way to house the modern nomadic workforce than shipping containers?

Continue reading after the jump.

Take a look at the view from the tippy top of Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park, the supertall tower that will soon house the world’s billionaires

The Penthouse at 432 Park Avenue. (Matt Shaw / AN)

The Penthouse at 432 Park Avenue. (Matt Shaw / AN)

AN got a rare look at the penthouse of 432 Park, Rafael Viñoly‘s soon-to-be-tallest residential building in the western hemisphere. After a six-minute ride on the construction lift, expansive, $95 million views open up in a 360 degree panorama from large square windows along all four sides of the full-floor apartment.

See for yourself after the jump.

New York City converted this dingy subway tunnel into a colorful underground museum of street art

(Courtesy NYC DOT)

(Courtesy NYC DOT)

For a long time, the 900-foot pedestrian tunnel that leads to the 1 train in Washington Heights was one of New York City‘s creepiest spaces. Now, it’s been transformed into one of the city’s best places to see art—or at least take some impressive Instagram photos.

Continue reading after the jump.

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