Separated at birth: A reader spots the Whitney’s carbon copy predecessor

whitney-copy

This “separated at birth” image came to us via architect Ken Saylor who noticed a quirky doppelganger for Renzo Piano‘s about-to-open Whitney Museum. Anyone have other Whitney comparisons? Leave them in the comments below.

Video> Michael Adlerstein & John Gering on retrofitting the United Nations Secretariat Building

The United Nations Headquarters site in Manhattan (seen here in 1985) covers approximately sixteen acres from 42nd to 48th Streets between First Avenue and the East River. Among the buildings on the premises are the marble-framed 39-storey Secretariat (to the left); the General Assembly building topped with a shallow dome; the Dag Hammarskjöld Library (to the left of the Secretariat); and the building housing the Council Chambers and Conference Rooms which lies on the river's edge. (UN Photo/Yutaka Nagata.)

The United Nations Headquarters site in Manhattan (seen here in 1985) covers approximately sixteen acres from 42nd to 48th Streets between First Avenue and the East River. (UN Photo/Yutaka Nagata.)

In addition to being AN‘s Midwest Editor, I was the special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat in 2014, interviewing tall building designers, developers, and other experts at the skyscraper think tank’s Shanghai conference, and its annual CTBUH Awards ceremony in Chicago.

Watch the video after the jump.

DXA Studio designed this Lower East Side tower with a copper facade that changes over time

(Courtesy DXA Studio)

(Courtesy DXA Studio)

As this angular copper facade ages, its reddish brown skin will settle into a weathered green. It’s a sort of physical embodiment of the changes playing out in Manhattan’s Lower East Side and Chinatown as the city’s voracious luxury residence market continually searches for a new frontier.

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In just a few years, this tower by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill will be the tallest residential building on Planet Earth

(Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill)

(Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill)

The tallest of Manhattan’s rising supertall towers has been revealed—and believe it or not, the building that will make New York’s current crop of skyscrapers look like walkups is very, very glassy.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> This might be your only chance to see this rare Le Corbusier tapestry commissioned by Jørn Utzon

Art, East
Monday, April 20, 2015
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(Courtesy Bruun Rasmussen)

(Courtesy Bruun Rasmussen)

In mid May, New York City will be over run with fairs, exhibitions, and trade shows dedicated to design and art. The big events are the International Contract Furniture Fair (ICFF) and the Frieze Art Fair, but there will be literally scores of smaller spin-off events taking place that will be of interest to the architecture community.

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You’ll want to stop by the Dia in New York City to see LaMonte Young’s “truly immersive” Dream House

Art, East, On View
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Courtesy Dia Art Foundation)

(Courtesy Dia Art Foundation)

In New York in the 1960s and ’70s, a movement against pictorial, illusionistic, or fictive art began to favor more direct and literal figurations. This movement—now called Minimalism by many—was often spatial in nature as it was drawn on flat surfaces, sculpted, and displayed in white box galleries.

Continue reading after the jump.

Did Norman Foster design this New York City skyscraper?

The possible Norman Foster-designed tower in the NYC skyline. (Bauhaus Group via NYPress)

The possible Norman Foster-designed tower in the NYC skyline. (Bauhaus Group via NYPress)

A 900-foot tower is coming to Manhattan’s high-end Sutton Place and it looks like Norman Foster is the architect behind the geometric tower punctuated by inset terraces and gardens.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s a sneak peek inside Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

The construction-watching site Field Condition recently got to step inside New York City’s most anticipated new building. Yes, of course we are talking about Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid-like W57 that is scheduled to open next year. As we have written recently, the structure has topped out and its enclosure is well on its way, but we’re just now getting a sense of what things will look like inside.

Take a look inside the building after the jump.

Peek inside New York City’s newest, and endlessly delayed, subway station

(Courtesy MTA)

(Courtesy MTA)

In entirely expected news, the extension of the 7 line subway to Manhattan’s Far West Side has been delayed yet again. The New York Times reported that the new 34th Street station, which was scheduled to open by the end of 2013, and then by the summer of 2014, won’t actually be ready until July.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gaetano Pesce walks the line between art and architecture with new exhibit in Soho

Architecture, Art
Thursday, March 26, 2015
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pesce

(Allouche Gallery)

 

Gaetano Pesce is a designer who works between art and architecture and wants his designs to attack or argue against the results of standardized commercial design. He uses poetry, sometimes humor, color, and texture (in foam, resin, and urethane ) to create whimsical chairs, couches, and domestic art for gallery spaces.

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This roadway in New York City’s Washington Heights is being replaced by a pedestrian plaza with playfully meandering paving

(Courtesy New York City DDC and DOT)

(Courtesy New York City DDC and DOT)

New York City recently broke ground on a 14,000-square-foot public plaza in Washington Heights with a very wavy paving design. The Plaza de Las Americas  is intended to reference town squares found in the Caribbean, Central and South America. It was designed for the city by the RBA Group, a landscape architecture and engineering consulting firm.

Continue reading after the jump.

AN’s own Susan Kramer appears in New York Times video on Union Square

East, Media
Monday, March 23, 2015
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Union Square in New York City. (Wikimedia Commons)

Union Square in New York City. (Wikimedia Commons)

In the latest installment of its by “Block by Block” video series, the New York Times explored Manhattan’s thriving Union Square neighborhood. The video kicks off with AN‘s very own Susan Kramer, who is a long time resident of the area.

Watch the video after the jump.

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