Kimmelman says “flawed” One World Trade is a “cautionary tale”

One World Trade. (Flickr/ gigi_nyc)

One World Trade. (Flickr/ gigi_nyc)

New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman has weighed-in on 1 World TradeNew York‘s tallest,most superlative, open-but-not-yet-completed skyscraper. And, spoiler, he is no fan. Kimmelman’s piece is so chock-full of quotable critiques, it’s hard to decide where exactly to begin. But let’s start with the politics.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Window washers dangling from One World Trade Center rescued

East, News, Skyscrapers
Wednesday, November 12, 2014
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Secure window washers working at 1 World Trade Center on the north side—not where the accident happened. (Courtesy AN)

Secure window washers working at 1 World Trade Center on the north side—not where the accident happened. (Courtesy AN)

Firetrucks, police cars, and a helicopter surrounded 1 World Trade Center this afternoon to save two window washers who became trapped near the 69th floor on the south side of the building. According to the New York Times, the machine controlling the scaffolding, to which the washers were strapped, malfunctioned. Firefighters were able to reach them by cutting a hole in a nearby window and then bringing them to safety.  An official from the fire department said he believed the cause of the scaffolding failure was a snapped cable.

“They are in a difficult spot,” a fire department spokesman told the Wall Street Journal. “They are feeling the effects of hanging in there.”

Video> Installing James Carpenter’s Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center

The oculus at Fulton Center. (MTA)

The oculus at Fulton Center. (MTA)

Earlier this week, AN went inside the recently completed, $1.4 billion Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. As we mentioned, the station connects nine subway lines and is centered around a real show-stopper of an oculus. That massive skylight is wrapped in the Sky Reflector-Net, a 4,000-pound, James Carpenter–designed, structure that uses aluminum panels to disperse light throughout the station. Check out the video below to see how the MTA strung-up the high-tech net.

Watch the video after the jump.

Pictorial> The new Fulton Center opens in Lower Manhattan

Looking into the main hall. (Henry Melcher /AN)

Looking into the main hall. (Henry Melcher /AN)

When the new Fulton Center opened this weekend—after seven years of delays and cost overruns that lifted the project’s price tag from $750 million to $1.4 billion—New York City got two things: a modern upgrade to its transportation network and an iconic piece of architecture. With new well-lit concourses, pedestrian tunnels, escalators and elevators, and more intuitive transfer points between nine subway lines, Fulton Center will drastically improve the transit experience for the 300,000 people who pass through it every day. But even with these significant improvements, all anyone is talking about is the center’s eye-catching glass oculus and its hyperboloid Sky Reflector-Net installation. Step inside the station, and you’ll understand why.

Continue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #25> 4 World Trade Center by Fumihiko Maki

Architecture, East, Skyscrapers
Monday, October 27, 2014
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(Benjamin Kracauer)

Archtober Building of the Day
4 World Trade Center
150 Greenwich Street
Maki and Associates

Located along the western edge of Memorial Plaza, 4 World Trade Center by Maki and Associates is part of the Studio Libeskind master plan for the World Trade Center being developed by Silverstein Properties. This weekend, Archtober crowds toured the building.

Continue reading after the jump.

Meet Fleurt, New York’s most anticipated chair of the fall season

Behold, the Fleurt. (Courtesy Andrew Jones)

Behold, the Fleurt. (Courtesy Andrew Jones via NYC Parks and The Battery Conservancy)

Fleurt, the winning design for the Battery Conservancy America’s “Draw Up a Chair” competition, has been described as an “archetypal floral form” and even a “whimsical suggestion of sun-loving flowers floating in a field.” But it is much more than that. Fleurt “announces openness and photogenic warmth” and creates a “memorable, diaphanous landscape.” Fleurt “stretches out” with its “lounging curves.” Fleurt is, yes, fine, technically a chair.

Continue reading after the jump.

From 67 floors above the World Trade Center, a progress report

Architecture, Development, East, News, Skyscrapers
Thursday, September 11, 2014
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Aerial view of the site. (Courtesy Silverstein Properties)

Aerial view of the site. (Courtesy Silverstein Properties)

Earlier this week, AN went up to the 67th floor of the recently-opened 4 World Trade Center to get a progress report on the 16-acre redevelopment taking shape below. Inside the wide-open and raw space, Larry Silverstein, the site’s developer, told reporters that his vision for a new World Trade Center had finally become a reality. “I’ve gotten a bit of a reputation as a wild-eyed optimist,” he said in front of a wall of windows. “But even I have to admit that I didn’t see all this coming.” Noting that it had been 13 years since the attacks, he went on to refer to the anniversary as the site’s “bar mitzvah.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Design Trust For Public Space Announces Winners of its Public Space Competition

Awards, City Terrain, Urbanism
Thursday, July 31, 2014
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THE ENERGETIC CITY. (COURTESY DEUTSCH NY)

THE ENERGETIC CITY. (COURTESY DEUTSCH NY)

Last night, AN was over at the National Museum of the American Indian in Lower Manhattan, to hear the Design Trust for Public Space announce the winners of  Energetic City: Connectivity in the Public Realm—its open call for proposals to reimagine the city’s public space. Out of over 90 submissions that came from individuals, city agencies, and community groups, the jury selected four winning plans that should collectively include programming in all five boroughs.

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Kohn Pedersen Fox Sprouting Glass Superlatives Around New York City

101 Tribeca's pinnacle. (Courtesy Kohn Pederson Fox)

101 Tribeca’s pinnacle. (Courtesy Kohn Pedersen Fox)

Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) is racking up an impressive collection of superlatives with a host of new glass towers in New York City. Of course there is Hudson Yards where a glossy KPF-designed building will become the tallest tower at the country’s largest private development site, but that is just the start of it.

Continue reading after the jump.

Winning Crowdsourced Designs Unveiled for New York City Hotel

The work space. (Pierre Levesque via PSFK and Prodigy Network)

The work space. (Pierre Levesque via PSFK and Prodigy Network)

It is only fitting that a crowdfunded hotel slated for New York City has a crowdsourced design as well. For its new, extended-stay hotel at 17 John Street, developer Prodigy Network, along with design blog PSFK, launched the Prodigy Design Lab, which allowed designers from around the world to submit plans for the project’s interior spaces and digital services. After 70 submissions were received and 10,000 votes cast, three winners have been announced.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Nine-Story Woolworth Building Penthouse To Be Listed for $110 Million

The Woolworth Penthouse. (FlICKR / massmatt)

The Woolworth Penthouse. (FlICKR / massmatt)

At this point, the record breaking sales of luxury apartments in Midtown are not really news. As the towers rise higher, so do the prices. This has been the trend for quite some time and it shows no signs of slowing down. With that said, did you hear about the one Downtown? Bloomberg reported that the nine-story penthouse at Cass Gilbert’s Woolworth Building is expected to be listed for $110 million. The top 30 floors of the tower are currently being converted into luxury apartments, but the penthouse is quite literally Woolworth’s crown jewel—and it is priced as such.

Continue reading after the jump.

Photo of the Day: Final Segment of Calatrava’s NYC Transit Hub Arch Set In Place

Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transit Hub. (Courtesy AN Tipster)

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub. (Courtesy AN Tipster)

A tipster shared with us the above view of Santiago Calatrava‘s World Trade Center Transit Hub receiving the final piece of its giant steel arch. According to the tipster, “they JUST set the final tooth on the World Trade Center Transit Hub to complete the supporting structural system. Once welding is complete they will proceed with installing the “wings,” the cantilevered outriggers that complete the structural form.” Looks like this thing is about to soar.

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