NBBJ’s just-opened Samsung headquarters seeks urbanism in Silicon Valley

Architecture, Interiors, Newsletter, Urbanism, West
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
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Courtyard encourages public and employee interaction. (Courtesy NBBJ and Samsung)

Courtyard encourages public and employee interaction. (Courtesy NBBJ Architects)

Samsung’s new North American headquarters in San Jose is now open for business. Designed by NBBJ, the 1.1 million-square-foot, $300 million building presents itself as a counterpoint to the introverted campuses that dot Silicon Valley: Facebook’s self-contained, Gehry-ific HQ or Foster’s secluded spaceship for Apple.

Continue reading after the jump.

Downtown Cleveland Alliance taps Chicago’s PORT to reinvent a shadowy underpass

Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT)

Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT)

Chicago-based PORT Urbanism will work with the Downtown Cleveland Alliance to turn a forbidding underpass near Cleveland‘s warehouse district into a vibrant pedestrian space, now that the Chicago-based firm has been selected as the winner of a design competition to revive the Main Avenue Bridge. Read More

Tallinn Architecture Biennale re-imagines the capital of Estonia as a driverless city

Render (Courtesy Enhanced Urban Movement via the Tallinn Architecture Biennale)

Render (Courtesy Enhanced Urban Movement via the Tallinn Architecture Biennale)

As part of the city’s unofficial bid to become the European Green Capital of 2018, Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, is re-imagining its layout in the Tallinn Architecture Biennale.

Continue reading after the jump.

Not a car in the world: Nashville neighborhood abstains from use of cars for a whole week

National, Transportation, Urbanism
Tuesday, September 22, 2015
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(Courtesy Daniel Weir / Flickr)

(Courtesy Daniel Weir / Flickr)

While major cities in Europe and across the world are experimenting with the car-free lifestyle, the American South is not likely on anyone’s radar as the next to embrace the trend. A neighborhood in Nashville, Tennessee, however, has promised to not use cars for an entire week, leaving them at home as part of the “Don’t Car Campaign.”

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Rios Clementi Hale’s parklet rains on Park(ing) Day in Los Angeles

Architecture, Design, Urbanism, West
Friday, September 18, 2015
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RCHS_ParkingDay2015_P1050766

Rios Clementi Hale Studios’ “Paradise in a Parking Spot” for Park(ing) Day 2015. (Rios Clementi Hale Studios)

Park(ing) Day, the annual tradition of making micro-parks out of parking spots, calls attention to the need for public space in cities. A pop-up park by Rios Clementi Hale Studios in Los Angeles takes the educational imperative further with a parking space that teaches the benefits of stormwater capture—just in time for this winter’s predicted El Niño.

Continue reading after the jump.

MAD reveals slimmed-down Lucas Museum on the Chicago lakeshore

(Courtesy Lucas Museum of Narrative Art)

A bridge across Burnham Harbor has been eliminated from the proposal. (Courtesy Lucas Museum of Narrative Art)

The PR team boosting the George Lucas Museum today unveiled new renderings of the Star Wars filmmaker’s high-profile and controversial proposal to turn a swath of land on Chicago’s lakefront into a gallery for Lucas’ art collection, digital art and movie memorabilia.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York’s art house cinema IFC Center expanding with help from Kliment-Halsband Architects

Architecture, East, Urbanism
Thursday, September 17, 2015
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Rendering looking south on Cornelia Street. Courtesy of Kliment Halsband Architects

Rendering looking onto Cornelia Street. (Courtesy Kliment Halsband Architects)

Good news for film fans. New York City’s IFC Art House cinema on Sixth Avenue is set to expand, increasing the number of screens from 5 all the way up to 11. The expansion by Kliment-Halsband Architects is a refreshing change in the cinema world which has seen numerous theaters close down this year.

Continue reading after the jump.

Highly anticipated rezoning for East New York to be revealed next week

Development, East, News, Urbanism
Thursday, September 17, 2015
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Proposed rezoning under the East New York Community Plan (Courtesy NYC Planning)

Proposed rezoning under the East New York Community Plan (Courtesy NYC Planning)

There are big changes planned for Brooklyn’s East New York. On Monday, September 21st, the Department of City Planning will unveil the full East New York Community Plan. The plan is part of Housing New York, Mayor de Blasio’s ten year plan to stabilize existing affordable housing supply and build 80,000 new units.  Read More

West 8 to remake a boulevard in Rotterdam into a pedestrian and cyclist–oriented thoroughfare

Renderings of the Coolsingel. Courtesy West 8

Renderings of the Coolsingel. (Courtesy West 8)

This month, Adriaan Visser of Rotterdam‘s city council and Adriaan Geuze, principal of landscape architecture firm West 8, unveiled a new plan for the municipality’s 0.6 mile long Coolsingel. The streetscape aims to restore the allure of the 19th century boulevard which once defined the area.

More after the jump.

Behind the Veil: The Broad opens September 20

Architecture, Art, Urbanism, West
Tuesday, September 15, 2015
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The Broad. (Courtesy Iwan Baan)

The Broad. (Courtesy Iwan Baan)

When The Broad opens to the public on September 20, Angelenos will finally get to see how Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s design compliments philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad’s powerhouse collection of 2,000 pieces of contemporary art in their eponymous museum. Works by Ed Ruscha and Cindy Sherman will hang in the 35,000-square-foot, column-free gallery space lit by some 300 skylights.

Read More

Boomtown: Houston poised to overtake Chicago as country’s third-largest city by 2025

Downtown Houston. (eflon / Wikimedia Commons)

Downtown Houston. (eflon / Wikimedia Commons)

The Texas metropolis of Houston is famous (or perhaps infamous) for its sprawling footprint. But as recent census numbers affirm, that growth reflects more than just a lack of zoning—within 10 years, more people will live in Houston than Chicago, according to information from health departments in Illinois and Texas. (Read AN‘s feature examining Houston’s first General Plan here.)

Continue reading after the jump.

California studying a highway-topping wildlife bridge to keep cougars out of traffic

Environment, Transportation, Urbanism, West
Monday, September 14, 2015
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Proposed wildlife crossing infrastructure. (Courtesy Resource Conservation District)

Proposed wildlife crossing infrastructure. (Courtesy Resource Conservation District)

A car driving on a section of Interstate 5 just north of Los Angeles struck a mountain lion named P-32 one early morning this past summer. The cat was once of a small population that has been tracked roaming Southern California wilderness areas. The death, while reported as “sad, but unsurprising,” drew attention to the close proximity of these animals. Our transportation and urban infrastructures draw unnatural lines through their natural habitats.

Continue reading after the jump.

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