After redesigning Times Square, Snøhetta takes on crowded blocks around Penn Station

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

The frustratingly congested, obnoxiously loud, and aggressively dirty area around Penn Station is easily the worst part of Manhattan. It is the reason why tourists qualify their vacation stories about New York with “but I could never live there.” Turning the dreadful area around the station (let’s leave the hated station out of it for now) into a pleasant place where people want to spend time and not just push and shove their way through is a Herculean task, but one that Snøhetta has agreed to take on.

Continue reading after the jump.

Mecanoo Brings Dutch Craftsmanship to Boston

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Mecanoo and Sasaki's Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building features a curved brick and glass envelope. (Courtesy Mecanoo)

Mecanoo and Sasaki’s Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building features a curved brick and glass envelope. (Courtesy Mecanoo)

Curving brick and glass facade heralds Roxbury’s resurgence.

By locating their new administrative building in beleaguered Roxbury, Boston Public Schools [BPS] made a powerful statement of faith in the area’s resurgence. Read More

Kohn Pedersen Fox’s One Vanderbilt now has all the approval it needs to climb 1,501 feet over Manhattan

One Vanderbilt. (Courtesy KPF)

One Vanderbilt. (Courtesy KPF)

In late May, the New York City Council unanimously voted in favor of a plan to upzone a five-block stretch of Vanderbilt Avenue next to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan. The widely expected move gives developer SL Green the green light to start work on its 1,501-foot-tall office tower known as One Vanderbilt.

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Chicago beckons pedestrians with Dr. Seussian green and blue dots

The view of Chicago's Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection as part of the “Lincoln Hub” traffic calming  and placemaking project, as seen from St. Alphonsus Church. (John Greenfield)

The view of Chicago’s Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection as part of the “Lincoln Hub” traffic calming and placemaking project, as seen from St. Alphonsus Church. (John Greenfield)

Who polka dotted West Lakeview? The area around the Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection on Chicago‘s North Side looks like a giant game of Twister, as Streetsblog’s John Greenfield points out, thanks to a whimsical, low-tech placemaking initiative that is part of a larger $175,000 streetscape project along Lincoln Avenue. Read More

Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

Plans unveiled for the Red Line Greenway, Cleveland’s answer to The High Line

A rendering of the Red Line Greenway proposal. (Original photo courtesy of Share the River, Rendering by Evan Peterson, LSU Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, via The Cleveland Plain Dealer)

A rendering of the Red Line Greenway proposal. (Original photo courtesy of Share the River, Rendering by Evan Peterson, LSU Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, via The Cleveland Plain Dealer)

A video released last week gives Clevelanders the clearest picture yet of plans for a greenway beside the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority’s Red Line. The idea has drawn comparisons to New York’s High Line or Chicago’s Bloomingdale Trail (aka The 606). Watch the video after the jump.

Diana Balmori’s Meditation Room at IDEASCity 2015 explores the possibility of expansive horizons in crowded cities

(Courtesy Balmori Associates)

(Courtesy Balmori Associates)

Stemming from the idea that a city is but a stack of layered horizons, landscape architect Diana Balmori’s public installation for IDEASCity 2015 invites the viewer to contemplate where horizons occur in a pause-for-thought experience. Meditation Room: Horizon is a continuous constructed wall of paper where the overlapping of two dot matrix systems creates a visible horizon slightly above eye level.

Continue reading after the jump.

Chicago opens newest segment of revamped Riverwalk

Mayor Rahm Emanuel at the opening of a new segment of the Chicago Riverwalk. (Office of the Mayor, Chicago)

Mayor Rahm Emanuel at the opening of a new segment of the Chicago Riverwalk. (Office of the Mayor, Chicago)

Despite a smattering of gray skies, Chicago inaugurated another stretch of its revamped riverwalk this Memorial Day weekend, and visitors were eager to explore the newly expanded public space.

Continue reading after the jump.

This stack of shipping containers by LOT-EK could become the nomadic coworking office of the future

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

The future of the mobile office is on its way, and it’s blurring the lines between the home and the workplace. Spacious is the name of a “coworking hotel” concept being touted by its founder and CEO, Preston Pesek, as the future of the workplace, combining a traditional coworking space, a hotel, and retail into a giant live, work, play experience. And what better way to house the modern nomadic workforce than shipping containers?

Continue reading after the jump.

Diane Davis to head Harvard GSD’s Department of Urban Planning

East, Shft+Alt+Del, Urbanism
Friday, May 22, 2015
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Diane Davis. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

Diane Davis. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

Just days after the Harvard Graduate School of Design announced that Anita Berrizbeitia would be the new chair of its Department of Landscape Architecture, the school has announced another big appointment: Professor Diane Davis will be head its Department of Urban Planning.

“Davis teaches courses and options studios that examine the role of politics in planning and design, relations between urbanization and development, and socio-spatial practice at the scale of the city,” the school said in a statement. “Her research focuses on urban transformations in the global south, particularly the urban social, spatial, and political conflicts that have emerged in response to globalization, informality, and political and economic violence. In her capacity as co-director of the Risk and Resilience track in the Master in Design Studies (MDes) program, Davis explores overlapping vulnerabilities in the built and natural environment and assesses their significance for planning theory and design practice.”

Both Davis and Berrizbeitia will assume their new roles on July 1.

 

New York City converted this dingy subway tunnel into a colorful underground museum of street art

(Courtesy NYC DOT)

(Courtesy NYC DOT)

For a long time, the 900-foot pedestrian tunnel that leads to the 1 train in Washington Heights was one of New York City‘s creepiest spaces. Now, it’s been transformed into one of the city’s best places to see art—or at least take some impressive Instagram photos.

Continue reading after the jump.

Joseph Wong to design mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr/JWDA)

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr)

Local real estate and investment company Zephyr has named Joseph Wong of Joseph Wong Design Associates (JWDA) lead architect of their 60,000-square-foot mixed-use development planned for downtown San Diego. The Block, as it is currently known (the developer has yet to select a final name), will be the first high-rise, mixed-use project in the city since the recession. With an estimated cost exceeding $250 million, the development promises to be a major player in the demographic and architectural transformation of San Diego’s urban core.

Continue reading after the jump.

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