Cone PWN: Video captures Brits dressed as traffic cones blocking streets in southwest London

(Courtesy Chris Anson via the Evening Standard)

Cause of commotion. (Courtesy Chris Anson via the Evening Standard)

In the southwest London borough of Kingston upon Thames, police officers were left giggling at the sight of walking traffic cones early last Sunday morning. The police file even read: “Males dressed as traffic cones, blocking the street like traffic cones.” However, the Evening Standard has revealed that the act isn’t just a drunken parade, rather a protest against Über car service.

Continue after the jump.

Gehry’s Los Angeles River study awarded one million dollar grant

los-angeles-river-05

Is there gold in the L.A. River? The Los Angeles River Revitalization Corporation just released news that it was awarded a million dollar matching grant from the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy in support of the Frank Gehry-led study of the 51-mile waterway. Read More

Report finds the Middle East could soon be too hot for human inhabitation as Dubai moves forward with its own indoor rainforest in a skyscraper

View of the Burj Khalifa in the background (Courtesy ZASA)

View of the Burj Khalifa in the background (Courtesy ZASA)

In an ironic twist, the global fuel powerhouse that is the Middle East is at risk of becoming too hot for human life due to the emissions produced as a result of creating that fuel. Such news evidently means little to the city of Dubai which is currently in line for two new luxurious skyscrapers, one of which will feature its very own rainforest.

Continue after the jump.

With help from a TIGER grant, the Bronx River Greenway is one mile closer to completion

Concrete Plant Park (Courtesy Majora Carter / Flickr)

Concrete Plant Park (Courtesy Majora Carter / Flickr)

As of October 27th, the Bronx River Greenway is one mile closer to completion. The United States Department of Transportation awarded a $10 million TIGER grant to the city to build three bridges and a three-quarter mile path connecting the South Bronx‘s Concrete Plant Park with nearby Starlight Park. Though modest in scale, the grant adds momentum to the decades-long movement to green one of the most industrial areas in the borough.

Continue reading after the jump.

Removal of Vancouver’s Viaducts: Making room for housing, culture, and parks

Vancouver without the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts. (Courtesy City of Vancouver)

Vancouver without the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts. (Courtesy City of Vancouver)

On October 27th, the Vancouver City Council voted 5–4 to remove the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts, making space for housing, culture, and parks.

The viaducts were part of a proposed freeway system through East Vancouver in 1971, until residents protested, and the project was abandoned. In June 2013, the city council made a unanimous vote to study the potential impact of removing the viaducts that connect the downtown to neighborhoods on the city’s East side.

Continue reading after the jump.

Exploring Crown Hall and future of Emerging Voices at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Art Basel in Basel 2015 | DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY | Courtesy Rirkrit Tiravanija Nikolaus Hirsch Michel Mueller and Antto Melasniemi

Art Basel in Basel 2015 | DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY  (Courtesy Rirkrit Tiravanija Nikolaus Hirsch Michel Mueller and Antto Melasniemi)

At the Chicago Architecture Biennial, the role of the horizon in architectural display and setting for events was noticeable—both in the biennial’s discussions held at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Chicago during the opening as well in the main exhibition in the Chicago Cultural Center. Here is what made instant impressions. When the dust settles, various other things will emerge, that I am sure.

Continue reading after the jump.

Perkins+Will’s Bryan Schabel on updating historic campus architecture

The University of Chicago. (Luiz Gadelha, Jr. / Flickr)

The University of Chicago. (Luiz Gadelha, Jr. / Flickr)

Among the Windy City’s most well-known assets are its universities, from DePaul in Lincoln Park and the Loop to the University of Chicago in Hyde Park. Many of these campuses, in turn, are characterized by heavy brick and stone architecture in the Neo-Gothic style. The dominance of a single architectural style—a feature of many institutions of higher learning, not just Chicago‘s—presents a challenge to contemporary architects, who must combine a sensitivity to the existing campus fabric with the imperatives of contemporary college life.

Continue reading after the jump.

Marmol Radziner’s Past Forays into Guerrilla Architecture

Architecture, Urbanism, West
Thursday, October 29, 2015
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Stairway offers access to fenced off park circa 1998. (Courtesy Marmol Radziner)

Stairway offers access to fenced off park circa 1998. (Courtesy Marmol Radziner)

An architectural Banksy lurks behind the well-tailored facade of Marmol Radziner.

While the architecture and design-build practice is best known for its modern and high-end contemporary designs—they recently received two preservation awards one from the California Preservation Design Awards for the rehab of Richard Neutra’s 1955 Kronish House and the Pioneer in Modern Restoration & New Design Award from the Palm Springs Modern Committee—the firm recently revealed that it has a radical soul.

Continue reading after the jump.

Buffalo greens up with new form-based land use and zoning codes

City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, October 28, 2015
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(Courtesy Andrew Nash / Flickr)

(Courtesy Andrew Nash / Flickr)

Some claim that the city of Buffalo, New York, was not named for the large plains mammal but for the beau fleuve, the beautiful Niagara River, that empties into Lake Erie near the city. Regardless of whether this story is true or apocryphal, it’s undeniable that Buffalo is reprising its environmental heritage with the Green Code, a comprehensive update to the city’s zoning and land use regulations.

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Semi-finalists Announced for Pershing Square Competition

View-from-Pershing-Square-Building-eecue_29017_ddw1_ls

Ten teams make the semi-finals to makeover Pershing Square (Courtesy Pershing Square Renew)

A shortlist was announced for the Pershing Square Renew competition. Ten teams were selected to have a chance at a crack at redoing Ricardo Legorreta’s scheme. The five-acre park is seen as the centerpiece of a revitalized Downtown Los Angeles and the competition, a public-private partnership backed by councilmember José Huizar, is a critical step toward that effort.

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OMA’s stacked Timmerhuis project in Rotterdam edges closer to its December opening

(Courtesy OMA)

(Courtesy Ossip van Duivenbode / OMA)

OMA‘s Timmerhuis project for Rotterdam, a gleaming stack of municipal offices, will open to the public on December 11, 2015. The mixed-use building will primarily house office space taking up 262,000 square feet with residential, parking, gallery, and retail spaces occupying the rest of the building.

More after the jump.

Oslo plans to make its city center free from cars in four years

Köpcentret Oslo City (Jenny Andersson, News Øresund / Flickr)

Köpcentret Oslo City (Jenny Andersson, News Øresund / Flickr)

Norway currently boasts three World Rally Championship drivers (second only to France), all of considerable pedigree, yet its capital city of Oslo is planning to remove cars for good. Along with the proposal to ban cars is the plan to build 37 miles worth of bike lanes by 2019 and a new system for handicap bus services and delivery vehicles.

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