SOM design to replace Long Beach’s Late Modern civic center

A sleek vision from SOM replaces the Late Modern Long Beach Civic Center. (SOM/ Courtesy PECP)

A sleek vision from SOM replaces the Late Modern Long Beach Civic Center. (SOM/ Courtesy PECP)

It’s too late for Late Modernism in Long Beach after the city council voted unanimously to demolish the existing Long Beach Civic Center and replace it with a sleek modern design by SOM.

More after the jump.

Here’s Philadelphia’s ambitious plan to build a neighborhood over a railyard on the Schuylkill River

East, News, Urbanism
Monday, December 21, 2015
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SOM is leading the redesign of the area surrounding Philly's 30th Street Station (Courtesy SOM)

SOM is leading the redesign of the area surrounding Philly’s 30th Street Station (Courtesy SOM)

Cap and trade agreements are a standard tool in the climate change fight. Philadelphia, in collaboration with an urban design team led by SOM, is getting in on the game. Read More

Four finalists selected to redesign Pershing Square in Los Angeles

SWA with Morphosis (Courtesy of Pershing Square Renew)

SWA with Morphosis (Courtesy of Pershing Square Renew)

Pershing Square Renew just announced the four finalists of the Pershing Square design competition: SWA with Morphosis, James Corner Field Operations with Frederick Fisher & Partners, Agence TER with SALT Landscape Architects, and wHY with Civitas.

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Norman Foster: The quality of infrastructure determines the quality of our lives

Atlanta, left, and Hong Kong, right, were counterpoints in the conference's discussions.

Atlanta, left, and Hong Kong, right, were counterpoints in the conference’s discussions. (Jeremy Taylor / Chris Lee / Flickr; Montage by AN)

This month, the London School of Economics (LSE) hosted its 10th annual UrbanCities debates, a forum where world leaders in the field of urbanism come together to discuss their views on the subject and its relative disciplines (mainly architecture). This year AN caught up with Design Museum curator Deyan Sujic, Norman Foster, and Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena, among others for the debate.

Continue reading after the jump.

Meet The Green Line: How Perkins Eastman would remake Broadway through Manhattan into a 40-block linear park

(Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

(Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

By now, the “Bilbao Effect” is metonymy for a culture-led revitalization of a postindustrial city driven by a single institution housed in a starchitect-designed complex. The wild success of Manhattan’s High Line generates regional seismic effects—the Lowline, the QueensWay, and the Lowline: Bronx Edition all cite the high queen of linear parks as their inspiration. Upping the ante, Perkins Eastman unfurls the Green Line, a plan to convert one of New York’s busiest streets into a park.

Continue reading after the jump.

100 Fountains will revive New York City’s esteemed public drinking culture

City Terrain, Design, East, Urbanism
Tuesday, December 15, 2015
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A drinking fountain on the High Line (Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr)

A drinking fountain on the High Line (Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr)

Water, water, everywhere,
Nor any drop to drink.
—Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Though New York has the some of the cleanest municipal tap water, New Yorkers now consume 1.25 billion bottles of water annually. A contributing factor to the rise in bottled water consumption is the decline in the number of public drinking fountains. New York–based Pilot Projects would like to revive the grand tradition of public bubblers through a novel design/build competition.

More after the jump.

Designer envisions a Miami Beach that embraces the rising sea

#beachlife at this year's Design Miami/Art Basel (Courtesy joeldanielsz / Instagram)

#beachlife at this year’s Design Miami/Art Basel (Courtesy joeldanielsz / Instagram)

This year’s Art Basel/Design Miami was a wash. The tallest stilettos could not save feet from floodwaters that inundated streets and forced partygoers under small tents. Even when it’s not raining, water bubbles up through stormwater grates and sewers, a result of the city’s porous limestone bedrock.

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Plan uses solar, algae to transform the Tijuana River into sustainable infrastructure

The plan transforms the concrete channel into a sustainable piece of urban infrastructure. (Courtesy GENERICA Architects)

The plan transforms the concrete channel into a sustainable piece of urban infrastructure. (Courtesy GENERICA Architects)

All the chatter may be around Frank Gehry and the Los Angeles River, but that waterway is not the only channelized river on the West Coast. More than 40 years ago a 10.5-mile long stretch of the Tijuana River was concretized as a flood control channel to make more development possible. If Gehry’s scheme is all about hydrology, a new proposal for the Tijuana River is about electricity.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pershing Square Renew wants your input on Semi-Finalist Concept Boards

Rios Clementi Hale Studios with OMA AMO (Courtesy Pershing Square Renew)

Rios Clementi Hale Studios with OMA AMO (Courtesy Pershing Square Renew)

In October, Pershing Square Renew selected 10 teams as semi-finalists for the redesign of Downtown Los Angeles’ oft-maligned urban space. The international design competition drew hundreds of entries and the two-handfuls selected represent both local and global practices. Read More

West 8 transforms a town plaza beneath an elevated highway in Belgium

RENDERING OF ENGELS PLEIN. (COURTESY WEST 8)

RENDERING OF ENGELS PLEIN. (COURTESY WEST 8)

For years, Engels Plein, an “English Square” on the perimeter of Leuven, Belgium, has been dominated by viaducts overhead, making the square poorly accessible, dark, unsafe, and, consequently, rundown. To better connect the surrounding homes and commercial spaces, West 8 transformed the industrial space into an outdoor lounge with multiple terraces that encourage people to live, shop, and work in the area. Leuven, previously an industrial city, is now a center of architectural development and renovation.

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Farming Detroit: City considers expanding urban agriculture to include raising and slaughtering livestock

City Terrain, Midwest, Urbanism
Wednesday, December 9, 2015
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It is currently illegal to keep livestock in Detroit. (<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AHahn_CLP_Germany.JPG"> oman Köhler</a> Wikimedia Commons)

It is currently illegal to keep livestock in Detroit. ( Roman Köhler Wikimedia Commons)

Adding to its normal population of lions and tigers, Detroit may be gaining a whole new demographic of furry inhabitants if proposed legislation passes in the spring allowing urban farmers to keep livestock in the city limits.

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MVRDV’s winning idea to convert an old shopping mall and parking garage into a public street and urban lagoon

(COURTESY MVRDV)

(COURTESY MVRDV)

MVRDV, with the Urbanist Collaborative and LLJ Architects, won a competition to transform “T-axis,” 590,000 square feet of China-Town Mall and Haian Road, in downtown Tainan, Taiwan. To reconnect the city and nature, the China-Town Shopping Mall will be removed, a green, public corridor will be built along Haian Road, and an urban lagoon will be created within the former underground parking garage. Construction is planned to begin fall of 2016.

More after the jump.

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