San Francisco Facades+ Performance Conference: One Month and Counting!

West
Wednesday, June 12, 2013
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(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

(Courtesy Ken Yeang)

The San Francisco Facades+ Performance conference is exactly one month away! Join the conversation and rake in up to 8 AIA LU credits per day at the conference, presented by AN and enclos, July 11 to 12, 2013. An abundance of good information, networking opportunities, and hands-on workshops are on the agenda, so don’t miss the chance to attend this year’s invaluable two-day event.

Find out more after the jump!

London’s Olympic Village To Become Urban Housing Project

International
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
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East Village London (Courtesy East Village)

East Village London (Courtesy East Village)

The London 2012 Games may have ended over 10 months ago, but even without the 17,000 athletes that lived on the premises, the Olympic Village is still brimming with commotion. Construction has begun onsite to refurbish the still-nearly-new structures into a residential housing system, Get Living London, in a new neighborhood called East Village. The site’s new owners, the sovereign wealth fund Qatari Diar and British property developer Delancey paid $870 million for the Village and development land close by, according to The National.

Continue reading after the jump.

Wim De Wit Stepping Down At the Getty

Shft+Alt+Del, West
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
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Wim de Wit is stepping down at the Getty (Yoshihiro Makino)

Wim de Wit is stepping down at the Getty. (Yoshihiro Makino)

Major news in the world of architectural scholarship. Wim de Wit, Head of the Department of Architecture and Contemporary Art at the Getty Research Institute (GRI), is stepping down. He’s moving to Stanford, where he will be Adjunct Curator of architecture and design at the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts. De Wit’s wife, Nancy Troy, has been a professor of art at Stanford since 2010.

Continue reading after the jump.

After Half A Century, Cincinnati’s Roebling Bridge Welcomes Pedestrians

Midwest
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
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For the first time in half a century, residents of Cincinnati and Covington, Ky. can traverse the Ohio River on foot via Roebling Bridge, thanks to a pedestrian connector reopened June 4. The Roebling Bridge Pedestrian Connector ties Cincinnati’s central riverfront, the site of some major mixed-use development of late, to the city of Covington.

The $430,000 project is part of The Banks’ public infrastructure improvement program. Lane closures will accompany renovations on the north end of the bridge, where a new roundabout and traffic signal will take a few months to complete. Pedestrians, however, can walk on through.

Let’s just hope a certain New York City mayoral candidate doesn’t confuse the Roebling Bridge with its big brother in Brooklyn and snap a photo for his website!

Boston Proposes New Zoning to Help Spur More Urban Agriculture

East
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
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The first phase of the Mayor's Pilot Urban Agriculture Rezoning Project involved issuing an RFP seeking farmers to create a farm on two city-owned properties in South Dorchester. City Growers was selected and now operates two farms in Boston. (Courtesy of City Growers Boston/Facebook)

The first phase of the Mayor’s Pilot Urban Agriculture Rezoning Project involved issuing an RFP seeking farmers to create a farm on two city-owned properties in South Dorchester. City Growers was selected and now operates two farms in Boston. (Courtesy of City Growers Boston/Facebook)

The city of Boston is laying the ground work to grow and simplify the process for urban farming throughout the city. Mayor Thomas Menino and the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) are introducing an amendment, Article 89, to the current zoning that would create opportunity for expanded urban agriculture activities such as rooftop farming and opening farm stands and markets.

Continue reading after the jump.

Tower Implosion Makes Way For Mountains on Governors Island

City Terrain, East
Monday, June 10, 2013
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gov_imploded_01gov_imploded_02

It took only a few seconds for Building 877 on Governors Island—dynamited at various key points—to come crashing down in a pile of sand-colored dust (hopefully with no asbestos)! A group of about 150 lucky New Yorkers, including Raymond Gastil (heading back to his home in Seattle), Margaret Sullivan (H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture), Jonathan Marvel (Rogers Marvel Architects and one of the architect’s of the new Governors Island), Lance Brown, and The Guy Nordenson family, were invited to witness the “implosion” at 6:37a.m. on Sunday, June 9.

Videos and mountainous

Ismael Leyva Architects’ Skinny Residential Tower Set To Rise in Tribeca

East
Monday, June 10, 2013
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Rendering of the Tribeca Royale (left) and the construction site viewed from AN's offices. (Courtesy Ismael Levya Architects; Nick Miller / AN)

Rendering of the Tribeca Royale (left) and the construction site viewed from AN’s offices on Murray Street. (Courtesy Ismael Levya Architects; Nick Miller / AN)

Back in October 2010, ground was broken at 19 Park Place—which also has frontage on Murray Street directly across from AN‘s office. As Curbed reported nearly three years ago, the 25-foot-wide site was set to be the home of the Tribeca Royale, a futuristic, 21-story condominium tower designed by New York-based Ismael Leyva Architects and developed by ABN Reality. Signage on the construction site and a press release that landed in our mailbox today assure that the project is still going forward as planned, but a peek out of the office window confirms that progress on this Jetsonian tower has been moving at a stone-aged pace.

Continue reading after the jump.

Make Way For People! Chicago Opens First “People Plaza” on State Street

Midwest
Monday, June 10, 2013
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State Street's new People Spot, dubbed The Gateway. (Chris Bentley)

State Street’s new People Spot, dubbed The Gateway. (Chris Bentley / AN)

The median of a downtown stretch of State Street is now home to the latest of Chicago’s People Spots, a series of parklets sprinkled throughout the city as part of its “Make Way for People” program.

Dubbed “The Gateway,” the portion of State Street between Lake Street and Wacker Drive features shaded tables and chairs in what the city is calling its first “People Plaza.” Flowerboxes, banners, and bright red and blue colors lighten up the otherwise utilitarian median. While the spot’s central location is probably its greatest asset in attracting visitors, satisfying views of downtown’s architectural gems impart some elegance to the straightforward design.

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> The Comprehensive New York Design Week 2013 Roundup

East, Newsletter, Product
Monday, June 10, 2013
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The Low Collection by 13&9 Design

The Low Collection by 13&9 Design.

New York’s inaugural design week, held from May 10 through 21, was a comprehensive, two-week celebration of all things design across Manhattan island, as well as parts of Brooklyn. Showcasing the latest from industry stalwarts to emerging and independent designers—local, domestic, and international—AN culled its top picks of New York Design Week products from the ICFF show floor, Wanted Design exhibitions, showroom launches, and all events in between. 

The Low Collection
13&9 Design
The multidisciplinary Austrian design studio debuted at Wanted Design with a collection of furniture, wearable fashion and accessories, a cinematic video, and a music album. With the Low Collection (pictured above), Corian is formed into several seating styles that combine with storage vessels, all at ground level. Suitable for outdoors, furniture heights can be modified to generate a unique landscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

Q+A> Michael Graves On His J.C. Penney Collection

National, Newsletter, Product
Monday, June 10, 2013
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Michael Graves (left) and the toaster he designed for J.C. Penney (right).

Michael Graves (left) and the toaster he designed for J.C. Penney (right).

At J.C. Penney’s recent rebranding launch party, AN spoke with architect and product designer Michael Graves about his new collection for the company and some career highlights. He even offers advice for aspiring architects and designers and talks about some current design work.

How did designing a collection for JCPenney come about?

I’ve known some of the people at Penney’s since my Target days, so when this opportunity came around we were looking for a way to slow down our commitment to Target at that time. When Penney’s offered what they did to us, we grabbed it in a second. It was such a good deal in terms of having a shop within a store.

For me, that’s the game changer. If we were close friends and you told me you had to do some shopping for a relative or something like that, I’d tell you to go to our shop in Penney’s. It’s all there and that’s what excites me.

Continue reading after the jump.

Climbing the Wall: Architectural Record Tries Out An Online Paywall

Eavesdroplet, National
Monday, June 10, 2013
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(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

Readers enjoying Architectural Record’s free online content got a wake-up call in late May: a paywall for articles older than 30 days. Now to access “the archive,” one must subscribe to the publication or sign up for an online subscription ($20/year). Thus, Record, one of the oldest surviving publications on architecture, joins the ranks of The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, which in recent years have asked readers to pony up for full online access. Record’s move sent a jolt through the Twitterati of the architecture and design world, who speculated on what other pubs might follow. No paywall plans for us, Metropolis and Architect cheerfully tweeted back. Thanks to its high volume of online traffic, Record can afford to experiment with paid content, even if it means stymying some potential readers. On Reddit’s architecture site, a recent post that asked “What design do you like best?” and included a link to Record received the reply: “I like the one that doesn’t link to the F—ING PAYWALL.”

Grannie’s and Drones: Group Seeking to Make New York a “No Drone Zone”

East
Monday, June 10, 2013
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A (fake) sign announcing drone patrols in TriBeCa (left) and the LEAPP Drone (right).

A (fake) sign announcing drone patrols in TriBeCa (left) and the LEAPP Drone (right).

On a recent walk down Broadway near the AN offices in Lower Manhattan I was handed a flyer by The Granny Peace Brigade who were protesting in front of a building where several New York City Council Members have offices. The flyer claims in bold letters “High Tech Stop and Frisk: Domestic Drones Coming to Your Neighborhood?” It had an image of a LEAPP Drone made by Brooklyn Navy Yard–based Atair Aerospace who claim their powered paraglider “is a slow-flying, long endurance powered paraglider UAV [Unarmed Aerial Vehicle] platform that is used for ISR [Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance] and distributive operations payload delivery missions,” but that the Brigade believes could be used to monitor for loitering.

Continue reading after the jump.

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