Pei Cobb Freed’s 7 Bryant Park Tower Breaks Ground in Manhattan

East
Friday, March 1, 2013
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Mayor Bloomberg participates in the groundbreaking, left, and a rendering of the new building, right. (Edward Reed; Courtesy Pei Cobb Freed)

Mayor Bloomberg participates in the groundbreaking, left, and a rendering of the new building, right. (Edward Reed; Courtesy Pei Cobb Freed)

Another skyscraper is rising in Midtown Manhattan. Developers Hines and Pacolet Milliken broke ground this week on Pei Cobb Freed’s 7 Bryant Park tower (aka 1045 Avenue of the Americas) that was unveiled in 2011. The 28-story, 470,000-square-foot tower sits at the southwest corner of Bryant Park and features a distinctive hourglass-shaped cutout on its corner. “The hourglass facade detail will be a lens through which building occupants can view the park with dramatic and alluring immediacy,” architect Henry N. Cobb told AN in 2011. A 46-foot-diameter stainless steel disc will hover above the entrance. The building hopes to achieve LEED Gold status and is expected to be complete in early 2015.

More renderings after the jump.

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Cookin’ With Gas: New York Launches First Natural Gas-Powered Food Truck

East
Thursday, February 28, 2013
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Mayor Bloomberg serves a pizza at the Neapolitan Express food truck. (Edward Reed)

Mayor Bloomberg serves a pizza at the Neapolitan Express food truck. (Edward Reed)

If you’ve experienced a twinge of guilt for supporting an idling, carbon-emitting vehicle while waiting on line for gourmet macaroni-and-cheese, rejoice—a new day is dawning for NYC food trucks. In late February, Mayor Bloomberg inaugurated Neapolitan Express, the first food truck fueled by compressed natural gas. The truck, (which looks a wee bit like a retirement home bus) is a showcase for kajillionaire T. Boone Pickens’ company Clean Energy Fuels. Track it @NeaExpress.

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NYCHA’s Green Thumb: New Affordable Housing Complex Opens With Rooftop Farm

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 26, 2013
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(Courtesy NYC Housing Development Corporation)

(Courtesy NYC Housing Development Corporation)

It has been a rocky few months for the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), but the battered agency finally has some good news to report. State officials announced the opening of the Arbor House, a 124-unit affordable housing complex, located in the Morrisania section of the Bronx, that is not only LEED Platinum certified, but also features a hydroponic farm on the roof that supplies residents and the surrounding community with fresh produce. Built from local and recycled materials, the 8-story building was designed by New York-based ABS Architecture and includes a living green wall installation in the lobby, air-filtration systems, and indoor and outdoor exercise areas.

Continue reading after the jump.

NYCHA Chairman Fesses Up, Discusses Hurricane Sandy Response Shortcomings

East
Thursday, February 14, 2013
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Red Hook Houses (Courtesy of Shelley Bernstein/Flickr)

Red Hook Houses (Courtesy of Shelley Bernstein/Flickr)

After much silence, New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) Chairman John Rhea revealed at a panel on Tuesday that the cash-strapped agency failed to adequately prepare for Hurricane Sandy. The super storm left 80,000 tenants without heat or power for several weeks, exposing the weak infrastructure and fragility of over 250 buildings, and also the agency’s disorganization.

Continue reading after the jump.

WXY’s Claire Weisz, 2/22 Cocktails & Conversation

East
Thursday, February 14, 2013
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Please join us on Friday, February 22nd at the Center for Architecture for an informal interview: architect meets architecture critic, over drinks.
Claire Weisz, AIA, founding principal with studio-based design firm WXY, will join Jim Russell, architecture critic for Bloomberg News, for the latest installment of “Cocktails & Conversation,” a discussion series at the Center. Weisz and Russell will discuss WXY’s work, and whatever else comes up between sips.
Everyone who attends will enjoy “a custom drink inspired by the architect’s work…created especially for the occasion.” With drinks flowing–and as anyone who knows Weisz and Russell can tell you–this promises to be both lively and informative.
If you plan to attend, please RSVP to me: adam@ccsullivan.com, or 212.757.7932.

 

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A Boost in Federal Funds Expedite Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts

East
Wednesday, February 13, 2013
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Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy (Courtesy of David Sundberg/ESTO)

Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy (Courtesy of David Sundberg/ESTO)

Now that Congress has passed the $51 billion emergency aid package, Mayor Bloomberg is forging ahead with the recovery plans. The City will set aside $1.77 billion in federal funds dedicated to rebuilding homes, businesses, public housing and infrastructure that were damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Bloomberg did, however, warn that it could likely take a few months for the programs “to be approved and implemented.” Since the storm, the city, in conjunction with FEMA, has helped homeowners in New York through its Rapid Repairs Program. Read More

After Hurricane Sandy, Thousands of Buildings Added to FEMA’s New Flood Maps

East
Wednesday, January 30, 2013
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Damage from Hurricane Sandy. (David Sundberg / ESTO)

Damage from Hurricane Sandy. (David Sundberg / ESTO)

In post-Hurricane Sandy New York, it looks like Zone A is expanding, and stretching beyond waterfront properties to encompass buildings farther inland. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) released preliminary new maps on Monday revealing that an additional 35,000 homes and buildings are now listed in flood zones. Business and homeowners included in these new zones will likely see their insurance rates rise.

Continue reading after the jump.

Restoration of Brooklyn’s 3,200-Seat Loew’s Kings Theater Underway

East
Thursday, January 24, 2013
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Inside Loew's Kings Theater. (Courtesy NYC Mayor's Office)

Inside Loew’s Kings Theater. (Courtesy NYC Mayor’s Office)

The lights on the Loew’s Kings Theater’s marquee have been dark for over 35 years since the last showing of Islands in the Stream in 1977. In fact, the entire king-size, 3,200-seat, French-Baroque movie palace is looking quite dim these days, much of its ornate plasterwork worn, damaged, or missing from years of decay and neglect and its terra-cotta facade in need of cleaning. City officials had to string ropes of temporary construction lights through the still grandiose, if a little shabby, lobby, just to make the announcement on Wednesday that Brooklyn’s largest indoor theater is coming back to life in a big way thanks to $93.9 million in new investment from public and private sources.

Continue reading after the jump.

Ray LaHood to Continue as Transportation Secretarty.  Ray LaHood to Continue as Transportation Secretarty Ray LaHood will stay on as U.S. Secretary of Transportation for President Obama’s second term, a reversal from statements he made last year. Bloomberg is reporting that LaHood said he would be “sticking around for a while” during an inauguration ball last night, but he and a DOT spokesperson declined to elaborate or say how long he might remain with the administration. LaHood has been a strong proponent of high speed rail, among other forward-thinking transportation concepts gaining traction in cities across the country. He said recently at Chicago’s Urban Forum, “High-speed rail is coming to America. There’s no stopping it. We are not going back.”

 

Manhattan West’s Railyard-Spanning Platform Breaks Ground

East
Monday, January 21, 2013
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Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

Manhattan’s far west side is about to become one of the busiest construction sites in the country. Last Tuesday morning, officials gathered at the corner of 9th Avenue and West 33rd Street to celebrate the second major groundbreaking in the Hudson Yards District, Brookfield Properties’ trio of new SOM-designed towers comprising the Manhattan West development to be built over a large rail yard serving Penn Station. The $4.5 billion project’s first phase, construction of the north portion of the railroad-spanning platform that will eventually support development, is now underway, and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speculated that the second half of the platform could be underway in coming months. Excavation has been ongoing since the fall of 2012.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City Breaks Ground on High Bridge Restoration

East
Friday, January 11, 2013
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(Courtesy New Yorkers for Parks)

(Courtesy New Yorkers for Parks)

Officials broke ground today on the long anticipated restoration of New York’s High Bridge connecting the Bronx with Manhattan. Built in 1848 and today the city’s oldest bridge, the 1,200-foot-long span had long been a popular strolling bridge, even making an appearance in Edith Wharton’s 1913 novel Custom of the Country. The landmarked bridge was closed to the public in the 1970s, but after construction wraps up on the $61 million rehabilitation, strolling New Yorkers and bicyclists can once again cross high above the Harlem River—116 feet—and connect with the city’s growing waterfront Greenway. (See also: Photos of High Bridge before renovation.)

Improvements include pedestrian safety measures like accessibility ramps, viewing platforms, and new lighting. An eight-foot-tall cable mesh fence to prevent jumpers and throwing trash will also line each side, a point that drew criticism from some in the community who believe it’s unnecessary and will spoil views. In a statement released at the groundbreaking ceremony, Mayor Michael Bloomberg called High Bridge “one of our city’s great treasures.” He continued, “It will bring people here from all over the five boroughs, and even all over the world, to see some of the most spectacular views in the city.”

To Rebuild or Relocate? Cuomo Offers Options.  Houses damaged by Hurricane Sandy (Courtesy of David Sundberg) Over the last few months, there’s been much talk about rebuilding smarter after Hurricane Sandy to prepare for the next super storm. But one alternative has gone under the radar until today’s State of the State Address when New York Governor Cuomo proposed the Recreate NY-Home Buyout Program that would provide funds to buy out homeowners who wish to sell their properties and relocate elsewhere. Capital New York reported that a resident estimated that 60 percent of his Fox Beach community in Staten Island wants a buyout, and through FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, that just might be possible. But for a buyout to happen, it requires a several-step process that would need the “Bloomberg administration to petition the state for grant money.” If Cuomo follows through on his proposal, residents of Fox Beach and other waterfront communities who want to relocate might get their wish. (Photo: David Sundberg/ESTO)

 

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