Lineup Announced For NYC’s Architecture & Design Film Festival

East
Thursday, September 26, 2013
.
"My Brooklyn" Documentary By Director Kelly Anderson

“My Brooklyn” Documentary By Director Kelly Anderson

From October 16th through the 20th, Tribeca Cinemas will serve host to the Architecture & Design Film Festival, the country’s leading film festival for the architecture and design community. The festival will offer 25 film screenings, ranging in length from two to 95 minutes, each offering 15 distinct programs, in addition to panel discussions and book signings with internationally renowned designers and filmmakers. See the full schedule here and check out the full list of films with selected trailers below. Tickets go on sale October 1.

Continue reading after the jump.

Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture.  Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia's Graduate School of Architecture Mark Wigley, pictured, is stepping down as Dean of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, a role that he has held for the past decade. Wigley, a New Zealand–born architect and author, will continue his position through the academic year. Columbia’s president, Lee C. Bollinger, made the announcement through email, affirming that “in every context, [Wigley] has represented the School and the institution in ways that make us all proud to be part of such a vibrant place.” (Photo: Courtesy Columbia)

 

Who Needs an Oscar? California Senator Boxer Named National Asphalt Legislator of the Year

Eavesdroplet, West
Thursday, September 26, 2013
.
Senator Barbara Boxer. (Street photo by Isma Monfort Vialcanet / Montage by AN)

Senator Barbara Boxer. (Street photo by Isma Monfort Vialcanet/Flickr; Montage by AN)

California Senator Barbara Boxer has won many accolades over the years, to be sure. But none has been quite like the honor she was bestowed this month: National Asphalt Legislator of the Year, according to the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA). The group said it was particularly impressed with her role in the passage of MAP-21, the $105 billion 2012 Surface Transportation Funding Bill. NAPA Board of Directors Chairman John Keating pointed to Boxer’s ignoring of “naysayers who said a bill would never pass.”

To be fair the bill provided for billions in mass transit funding, but nonetheless Boxer has helped the state refurbish hundreds of miles of roads, and even build quite a few new ones. Not exactly a claim to fame in our transit-friendly design world. Ahem, don’t tell Elon Musk.

Name Changers: Los Angeles Architects Get New Identities

West
Thursday, September 26, 2013
.
why design's new home page. (Courtesy why design)

why design’s new home page. (Courtesy why design)

What’s in a name? It seems that every time we get used to an architect’s name they go ahead and change it. We’re still confused by the name Ennead Architects (formerly Polshek Partnership), and we can’t get our heads around monikers like Rogers Stirk Harbour (formerly Richard Rogers Partnership) and Populous (formerly HOK Sport). Not to mention the headaches when firms like AECOM swallow the likes of Ellerbe Becket and EDAW.

The latest on the new name train are some of LA’s brightest firms. Daly Genik Architects is now Kevin Daly Architects. And wHY Architecture is now why design. The former came as a result of shuffled leadership—partners Kevin Daly and Chris Genik parted ways amicably. The latter is a branding change to broaden the firm’s scope beyond architecture. Both have completely new web sites. And both, no doubt, will puzzle us all until we finally come to terms with the inevitability of change.

More Time with Norman, Please: Foster + Partners’ New Manhattan Tower Fails To Impress

East, Unveiled
Thursday, September 26, 2013
.
Rendering showing facade detail of Norman Foster's 551 West 21 Street. (Hayes Davidson /  Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Rendering showing facade detail of Norman Foster’s 551 West 21 Street. (Hayes Davidson / Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Foster + Partners likes to think of itself as a high-design firm with glamorous projects all over the world. But the banal rendering accompanying this week’s announcement of a new 19-story, “luxury” residential tower, 551 West 21 Street, belies their design skills. Could it be that they have a two-tier design strategy in their office where glamorous cultural institutions get “Sir Norman” and commercial towers get, well, something less?

Continue reading after the jump.

Getting in on the Ground Floor: Collective-LOK Wins Van Alen’s Ground/Work Competition

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
.
Winning Proposal (Courtesy of Collective-LOK/Van Alen Institute)

Winning Proposal (Courtesy of Collective-LOK/Van Alen Institute)

The Van Alen Institute, a non-profit organization devoted to public realm improvements in New York City, has announced Collective-LOK as the winner of its Ground/Work competition. The winning team—a collaboration between Jon Lott (PARA-Project), William O’Brien Jr. (WOJR), and Michael Kubo (over,under)—was selected from a pool of over 100 applicants, and beat out two other finalists: Of Possible Architectures and EFGH. The competition called on designers to re-imagine the ground floor level to accommodate new offices, bookselling platform, galleries, and event and programming space.

Continue reading after the jump.

Flint Flat Lot’s Floating House draws criticism

Midwest
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
.
Photos of the built work were questioned by some commenters. (Gavin Smith, courtesy Two Islands)

Photos of the built work were questioned by some commenters. (Gavin Smith, courtesy Two Islands)

When London-based Two Islands took first place in Flint, Michigan’s first Flat Lot Competition for public art, images of their floating, mirror-clad meditation on the foreclosure crisis turned heads. Six months later the project has been built, but it faced challenges and has drawn criticism making the leap from rendering to reality.

Continue reading after the jump.

Review> Set Designer Harnesses Nostalgia for Detroit in AMC’s New Series, “Low Winter Sun”

National, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
.
(Courtesy AMC)

(Courtesy AMC)

Nostalgia (nóstos), meaning “homecoming”, a Homeric word, and (álgos), meaning “pain, ache”, and was coined by a 17th-century medical student to describe the anxieties displayed by Swiss mercenaries fighting away from home. Ruth Ammon, set designer for the AMC television series, Low Winter Sun, used this word to describe the series in its most honorable sense. This tale of morality uses the architecture of Detroit’s heyday, to embody the pride of the city which elevated middle working class life.

It is poignant that the city’s decline is also apparent in every frame, rather than pimping these noble structures like urban porn. Whether featuring Albert Kahn’s Packard Automotive Plant, 1903-11 (the production offices were next door to this location, one of the largest parcels of unoccupied real estate in the Western hemisphere); Kahn’s Detroit Police Headquarters at 1300 Beaubien St., 1923 (given the same role in the series, but now under threat since the PDP moved out); the art deco David Stott Building of 1929 by Donaldson and Meier; St. Hyacinth Roman Catholic Church, 1924 by Donaldson and Meier; or the Venetian Gothic Ransom Gillis House, 1876-78 (documented extensively by photographer Camilo Jose Vergara), these were deliberate choices.

Continue reading after the jump.

Two Polls Indicate the Disposition of Harris County Voters Regarding $217 Million Astrodome Bond Fund

Southwest
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
.
The Astrodome during the 1999 Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo (Courtesy Gary Hunt/flckr)

The Astrodome during the 1999 Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo (Courtesy Gary Hunt/flickr)

The Houston Chronicle is reporting that two recent polls have given clues as to how the denizens of Harris County will vote in the matter of approving $217 million in bonds to fund the reuse of the Astrodome. Previously, the Harris County Commissioners Court set the matter of the bond fund to a November 5 referendum. If voters approve the fund, the Harris County Sports and Convention Corporation will be able to proceed with its plans to create a New Dome Experience in time for Superbowl LI in 2017. Harris County property tax will also experience a slight hike to pay for it all. If voters oppose the issue, the Astrodome will in all likelihood meet the wrecking ball. Either way, entrants to AN and YKK AP‘s Reimagine The Astrodome competition will be watching with bated breath.

Continue reading after the jump.

Drexel University Breaks Ground on Perelman Plaza Campus Center Redesign

East
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
.
Perelman Plaza is hoped to become the new social campus center of Drexel University. (Courtesy Andropogon Landscape Architecture)

Perelman Plaza is hoped to become the new social campus center of Drexel University. (Courtesy Andropogon)

The 32nd Street corridor at Drexel University in Philadelphia has become a hub for student gatherings, interaction, and events. Situated between Chestnut and Market Streets in the campus center, the corridor’s current design, however, does not serve the social and functional needs of its college population. In March, landscape architecture firm Andropogon released primary renderings and plans for a complete redesign of the space now known as Perelman Plaza. In August, more comprehensive images were revealed, and now the project is underway. Two weeks ago, Andropogon broke ground in Phase One on the site, razing the existing awkwardly angled hardscape to begin construction of a practical design for the coexistence of human traffic and nature.

Continue Reading After the Jump

SANAA’s Billowing Design Wins Taichung City Cultural Center Competition

International, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
.
SANAA's winning Taichung Cultural Center entry (SANAA)

SANAA’s winning Taichung Cultural Center entry. (Courtesy SANAA)

SANAA, together with Taiwanese studio Ricky Liu & Associates Architects + Planners, have won a competition to design the Taichung City Cultural Center. The competition, which was announced last May, asked  participants to design a complex that would not only include a new public library and fine arts museum, but would form a dramatic entryway to the the city’s Gateway Park.

Continue reading after the jump.

California Governor Mulling Bill Helping Architects Keep Control of Their Plans

West
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
.
California Governor Jerry Brown (James Joyner)

California Governor Jerry Brown. (James Joyner)

AB 630, a bill that ensures that no one can use an architect’s “instruments of service” (i.e. plans, drawings, schematics) without his or her written permission, recently passed the California legislature without a single no vote. The bill passed the Assembly 78-0 and the State Senate 37-0. But now architects are getting nervous, since governor Jerry Brown has not decided whether he will sign it.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 88 of 433« First...102030...8687888990...100110120...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License