Kickstarter> Support Deborah Sussman Loves Los Angeles

West
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
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(WUHO)

(WUHO)

Another day, another Kickstarter campaign. On the heels of several successful museum and gallery exhibition campaigns, Woodbury University Hollywood Gallery (WUHO) has decided to start a campaign for an upcoming exhibition celebrating the groundbreaking visual communication work of Los Angeles–based designer Deborah Sussman. Entitled Deborah Sussman Loves Los Angeles!, the exhibition, which is set to open in December, will be the first retrospective of her early environmental graphic design work, honing in on projects from her days at the Eames Office up to the 1984 Olympics.

Continue reading after the jump.

Public Art Fund Installation Creates a Colorful Terrain in Brooklyn

City Terrain, East, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Public Art Fund)

Just Two of Us by Katharina Grosse is a sculptural landscape of color in downtown Brooklyn. (Courtesy Public Art Fund / Flickr )

Amidst the trees of MetroTech Commons in downtown Brooklyn, a vibrant architectural terrain has been formed. In an installation piece called Just Two of Us, Berlin-based artist Katharina Grosse has situated eighteen large, multi-colored sculptural forms in the wooded public space. Sponsored by the Public Art Fund, the work creates a surprising show of colors and a form that walks the line between sculpture, architecture, and painting.

View the Gallery After the Jump.

Unbuilt Frank Lloyd Wright House Constructed at Florida Southern College

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Florida Southern / Flickr)

(Courtesy Florida Southern / Flickr)

A never-before-built Frank Lloyd Wright house has been painstakingly constructed on its original site at Florida Southern College. The 1700-square-foot Usonian house, designed by Wright in 1939 as modest faculty housing, is the 13th structure by the renowned architect to be built on Florida Southern’s campus, but the first since Wright’s death in 1959.

Continue reading after the jump.

Iowa Landscape Architecture Students Bring a Touch of Green Behind Bars

City Terrain, Midwest
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
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Outdoor classrooms under construction at the Iowa Correctional Institute for Women. (Landscape Architecture Magazine / Bob Elbert)

Outdoor classrooms under construction at the Iowa Correctional Institute for Women. (Landscape Architecture Magazine / Bob Elbert)

Thanks to a new student-led effort, green is no longer just the color of the year, it’s also the new orange. When the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville embarked on a $68 million expansion three years ago, the plan set aside no money for landscape design. But a collaboration between five landscape architecture students from Iowa State University and eight offenders is bringing a touch of green behind bars.

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Five Paul Rudolph Buildings Under Threat in Buffalo

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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Paul Rudolph's Shoreline Apartments in Buffalo, New York (Kelvin Dickinson / Flickr)

Paul Rudolph’s Shoreline Apartments in Buffalo, New York (Kelvin Dickinson / Flickr)

2013 has proven to be a difficult year for post-war concrete architecture. While some iconic structures have managed to emerge from the maelstrom of demolition attempts unharmed, including M. Paul Friedberg’s Peavy Plaza in Minneapolis and (tentatively) the Paul Rudolph–designed Orange County Government Center in Goshen, New York (the fate of which still remains uncertain), others have been less lucky.

John Johansen’s daring Mummers Theater in Oklahoma City, Richard Neutra’s Gettysburg Cyclorama and, more recently, Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Woman’s Hospital in Chicago have all been doomed to the wrecking ball. Despite architectural historian Michael R. Allen’s claim that the demolition of the Prentice’ Woman’s Hospital would be Modernism’s “Penn Station Moment,” the trend still pushes on.

The next in line to fight for its survival is a set of Paul Rudolph buildings in Buffalo, New York. Tomorrow, November 6, at 8:15 a.m., the Buffalo City Planning Board will convene to decide the fate of five buildings included in Rudolph’s 9.5-acre Shoreline Apartment complex.

Continue reading after the jump.

Ross Wimer to Lead AECOM Architecture

Shft+Alt+Del, West
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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Ross Wimer (AECOM)

Ross Wimer (AECOM)

Architecture and Engineering giant AECOM  has taken a big step to bolster its architecture offerings with the appointment of  Ross Wimer, former  partner and design director at SOM Chicago, as the leader of its architecture practice in the Americas. Wimer was known for fighting for design at SOM, and he plans to do the same thing at AECOM, where architecture can be overshadowed by much larger, and more profitable work.

Continue reading after the jump.

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On View> A Report From the 2013 Milan Triennale

On View
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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An auto-production line is part of Best Up.

An auto-production line is part of the Best Up exhibition.

The current Milan Triennale exhibition, running through December 2013, is on view in the city’s Palace of Art building, part of Parco Sempione, the park grounds adjacent to Castello Sforzesco. Nancy Goldring visited the exhibit for AN and reports back on the highlights of the exhibit.

When you enter the Milan Triennale, there is a line-up of fanciful chairs—rather a small version of Lucas Samaras’ great show at the Whitney. But the exhibition itself promises a much more serious consideration of the world of design. The Association for Industrial Design (ADI) added a new category to its 2010 Trienniale Design: Service Design. This year in Design for Living, Luisa Bocchietto and the Triennale committee have added yet another new section—Social Design—those who have offered examples of responsible design, an attempt to get away from simply the design of beautiful objects and to focus on the activities of designers who are trying to make a contribution to the way we live and change the systems themselves.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Charity Building A New School for Underserved Zambian Village

International
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Ennead Lab)

(Courtesy Ennead Lab)

Chipakata is small rural Zambian community with no local school so its children have to walk five miles to an overcrowded facility. But Joseph Mizzi, president of Sciame Construction, visited the village last year with New York City–based stylist and native-Zambian, Nchimunya Wulf. They both were inspired to start a non-profit to build a new school for the community. The duo launched the 14+ Foundation last June and after a fundraiser that garnered $350,000 for the organization to pit together a group of New York–based design professionals who are building a brand new facility in the heart of Chipakata.

Continue reading after the jump.

New Public Space Initiative Aims to Revive Austin’s Forgotten Alleyways

City Terrain, Southwest
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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20FT AUSTIN ALLEY AND ITS COLORFUL STREAMS (COURTESY 20FT WIDE)

20FT AUSTIN ALLEY AND ITS COLORFUL STREAMS (COURTESY 20FT WIDE)

Austin, Texas–based architects Dan Cheetham and Michelle Tarsney have given a new face to some of the city’s underutilized spaces: alleyways. Their one-of-a-kind community art installation, 20ft WIDE, seeks to resolve conflict between architecture, art, and humanism in order to create places of lasting value. The once forgotten alley between Ninth and Tenth streets, which connects Congress Avenue and Brazos Street in Downtown Austin, has been transformed into a collaborative space to bring attention to public urban places and foster discussion about the new possibilities for their uses

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> National Geographic’s “Greatest Photographs of the American West”

On View, West
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art)

(Courtesy Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art)

National Geographic’s “Greatest Photographs of the American West”
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
1430 Johnson Lane, Eugene, Oregon
Through December 31

Throughout its 125-year history, National Geographic has been home to some of the highest quality photojournalism in the world, captivating its audiences with powerful and spectacular imagery. This fall, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of the University of Oregon is displaying the magazine’s greatest photographs of the American West; a region that has long captivated photographers. The exhibition will run through to December 31.

Included are photographs by Sam Abell, Ansel Adams, William Albert, and many other renowned photographers. The exhibition is organized into four sections, each focusing on various aspects of the American West and its significance to the country’s national identity. From spectacular rock formations to cowboys and Native Americans, this exhibition draws from the significant holdings of the National Geographic Archive. The American West was organized with the National Museum of Wildlife Art of the United States and Museums West.

Maximize Your Value at SMPS’ Marketing Event this Friday

East
Tuesday, November 5, 2013
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SMPS EVENt

SMPS New York’s largest event of the year, the ninth annual THE Marketing Event “Maximizing Value”, is going down this Friday. Hundreds of AEC professionals from across the region are coming together to discuss how you can make a serious impact on the outreach and performance of your firm for little or no cost. As the industry emerges from the long recession, this year’s conference turns towards the strategies that you can implement to stabilize and expand your business without putting a dent in your budget. Conference workshops are divided into three tracts, so you can customize your schedule to meet your business’ needs. Marketing, business development, and leadership experts will be on hand to share their trade secrets as they discuss topics like public relations, implementing new technologies, and productivity. The symposium begins Friday at 8:00 a.m. at the CUNY Graduate Center and continues throughout the day.

SHoP Architects’ Massive Domino Sugar Redevelopment Moves Forward

East
Monday, November 4, 2013
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Domino Sugar Factory Redevelopment Plan (Courtesy of SHoP Architects)

Domino Sugar Factory Redevelopment Plan (Courtesy of SHoP Architects)

Today New York City Department of City Planning certified the application for Two Trees’ major redevelopment plans for the iconic Domino Sugar Factory site along the Williamsburg waterfront in Brooklyn, marking the start of the six-month public review process. Two Trees purchased the 11-acre property from developer CPC Resources, and is seeking to bump up the height of the buildings from the previously approved plan of 3.1 million square feet of space to 3.3 million square feet, add 500,000 square feet of office space, and dramatically increase the amount of open space. The developer enlisted SHoP Architects to design the plan. Last March, the developer unveiled their plans, which included a series flashy doughnut-shaped towers.

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