Doug Aitken’s “Station to Station” Winds Its Way Across the Country

National
Tuesday, September 24, 2013
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(Courtesy Station to Station)

(Courtesy Station to Station)

On Friday night at Riverfront Studios, motion-picture soundstages on 3 acres of East River waterfront between the Williamsburg Bridge and the Navy Yard, the newest art project by Doug Aitken called Station to Station was launched. Aitken did the “destruction” of Gallery 303 last year, Creative Time’s Broken Screen Happening at the Essex Street Market and Sleepwalkers projected on the wall of MoMA’s Sculpture Garden.

On the site of the former Schaefer Brewery, spotted in the crowd was Agnes Gund, Klaus Biesenbach, Chrissie Iles, Roxana Marcoci, Linda Yablonsky, Lisa Phillips and other art world luminaries. This event marked the inaugural nomadic “Happening” that moves in an Aitken-designed train from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Coast stopping at nine different locations each time for a one-night-only live event in September. The scene was set for live performances that included a colorful site-specific smoke bomb installation by Olaf Breuning; food happening created by artist Rirkrit Tiravanija; and an original performance choreographed by Jonah Bokaer inspired by Robert Rauschenberg’s Pelican (1963) on the occasion of work’s 50th anniversary and more.

Continue reading after the jump.

What’s Your -Ism? Tickets on Sale for Arch League’s 2013 Beaux Arts Ball

East
Tuesday, September 24, 2013
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69th Regiment Armory in Manhattan. (Photo by Esther Westerveld / Flickr; Montage by AN)

69th Regiment Armory in Manhattan. (Photo by Esther Westerveld / Flickr; Montage by AN)

In 1913, the 69th Regiment Armory in Manhattan hosted what was then considered the most shocking art exhibition the public had ever seen. The International Exhibition of Modern Art, which came to be called The Armory Show, introduced modern European art to an East Coast audience. A showcase of -ism art movements then in development and exploration by artists now considered masters of their craft, the event was transgressive; it induced backlash from several publications and from former President Theodore Roosevelt who commented that “the lunatic fringe was fully in evidence.”

Yet, even in his blatant dislike of the artworks displayed, President Roosevelt admitted the importance of the show’s existence, its revelation of the European “art forces that cannot be ignored.” This Saturday, September 28, in a centennial homage of the show that shocked the American world, the Architectural League of New York is hosting their annual Beaux Arts Ball in the same venue. Taking inspiration from a space originally meant for National Guard trainings and military activities, the ball will work with and within the great hall to transform its appearance, shockingly. (And tickets are on sale now!)

Continue Reading After the Jump

Pictorial> Mecanoo Opens New Birmingham Library

East, International
Monday, September 23, 2013
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(Christian Richters)

(Christian Richters)

Dutch firm Mecanoo’s latest civic building represents a new era in library design. The new Library of Birmingham in the UK replaces the former James Hardin–designed central library, a brutalist concrete structure. The new library is a sleek expression of the evolving nature of education and learning in the 21st century. The modern, metal-clad structure houses a variety of services, including a multimedia center, two cafés, a music library, a performance space, green outdoor terraces, a shop and a gallery. The design vision is that the space will offer culture and entertainment, as well as learning and information.

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Architecture Assemblages in Texas Create Curious Houses

Southwest
Monday, September 23, 2013
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Fifth Ward Jam (Courtesy Ed Schipul / Flickr)

Fifth Ward Jam. 2010. (Ed Schipul / Flickr)

Artists Dan Havel and Dean Ruck of Havel Ruck Projects have garnered attention for some interesting installation pieces in Houston, blurring the lines between art and architecture. Over the last eight years, the collaboration has constructed temporary artworks using old, wooden homes, bizarre shows of simultaneous deconstruction and reconstruction of architecture.

Inversion from 2005 recreates two wood bungalows, donated to the artists by Art League Houston, into a vortex of white wooden planks. In 2010, the Houston Art Alliance sponsored Havel Ruck Projects’s creation of Fifth Ward Jam. A wooden home doomed for refuse in Houston’s 5th Ward became an imaginative community stage of vertically spewed boards.

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Chris O’Hara to Deliver Dynamic Facades at Facades+ PERFORMANCE

Midwest, National
Monday, September 23, 2013
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Studio NYL and Rojkind Arquitectos produced the dynamic stainless-steel facade of the Liverpool Flagship Store in Mexico City (Courtesy Studio NYL)

Studio NYL and Rojkind Arquitectos produced the dynamic stainless-steel facade of the Liverpool Flagship Store in Mexico City (Courtesy Studio NYL)

With only one month remaining before Facades+ PERFORMANCE opens in Chicago, our exciting lineup of the industry’s leading innovators is gearing up for an electrifying array of symposia, panels, and workshops. Be there for this groundbreaking, two-day convergence of design and construction professionals, presented by AN and Enclos, coming to Chicago, October 24-25th.

Join Chris O’Hara, founding Principal of Boulder-based Studio NYL, for his day-one symposium, “Ludicrous Speed: the Design and Delivery of Non-traditional Facades on a Fast Track,” and learn first-hand from the experts the technologies and fabrication techniques that are revolutionizing the next generation of high performance facades. Register today to redefine performance for 21st century architecture, only at Facades+ PERFORMANCE.

More information after the jump.

Is the River Revitalization Trend Skipping Youngstown?

City Terrain, Midwest
Monday, September 23, 2013
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A view from the banks of the Mahoning River from the grounds of the B&O Station in Youngstown. (Jack Pearce / Flickr)

A view from the banks of the Mahoning River from the grounds of the B&O Station in Youngstown. (Jack Pearce / Flickr)

Across the country cities are revamping formerly industrial riverfronts. Plans are underway for Philadelphia’s Schuylkill, the Mississippi in Minneapolis, Town Branch in Lexington, and in downtown Chicago to reclaim urban rivers for mutual goals of ecology and urbanism. That hasn’t yet caught on in Youngstown, Ohio.

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LA’s Natural History Museum Addition Not For The Birds

West
Monday, September 23, 2013
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Natural History Museum's Otis Booth Pavilion (Art Gray)

Natural History Museum’s Otis Booth Pavilion (Art Gray)

While it’s received a warm reception, not everyone is excited about the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County’s new Otis Booth Pavilion.  The problem with the 67-foot-tall glass cube, said geographer Travis Longcore, is that it presents a fatal obstacle to the birds that the museum’s new gardens are meant to attract. As Longcore, who is an associate professor at USC as well as science director of The Urban Wildlands Group, explains, birds don’t understand architecture the way humans do. We avoid glass by attending to architectural cues, including doorways and lintels. Birds mistake glass for open air or the habitat it reflects, and often try to fly through it.

Continue reading after the jump.

LACMA Controversy Stirs Up Memories of LA’s Past Environmental Disasters

West
Friday, September 20, 2013
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lacma_zumthor_01

Zumthor’s design could disrupt the La Brea Tar Pits (Museum Associates)

Peter Zumthor’s design for a new central building at LACMA has some experts concerned with its environmental effects. Critics including John Harris, chief curator of the National History Museum’s Page Museum, worry that the project could disrupt the La Brea tar pits, the same ecological features that inspired the building’s blob-like shape. At a meeting last month the county Board of Supervisors voted 4-0 to request a presentation from the Page Museum fleshing out the curator’s concerns. That presentation has not yet been scheduled, according to the Page Museum’s press office.

Continue reading after the jump.

Lisbon Triennale’s Emphasis on Experimentation Offers A Path for Architects

International
Friday, September 20, 2013
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(Fernando García-Dory)

(Fernando García-Dory)

The 2013 Lisbon Architecture Triennale‘s emphasis on active workshops, networking and “research” projects rather than architectural set pieces often plays as live performative tableaus. The public focus of the exhibition is indeed an elevated stage in the city’s Praca da Figueira (Square of the Fig Tree) where architects are performing plays, encouraging civic engagement with public performances, and programming research workshops. Performance is also the operative scheme in another triennial initiative, The Institute Effect, that takes place the city’s Museum of Design.

Continue reading after the jump.

Facades+ Headliners Usher in The Future of Performance

National
Friday, September 20, 2013
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High Park in Montery, Mexico by Rojkind Arquitectos (courtesy Rojkind Arquitectos)

High Park in Montery, Mexico by Rojkind Arquitectos (courtesy Rojkind Arquitectos)

There’s a lot to be excited about in the jam-packed schedule of intimate dialog and tech workshops on day two of AN and Enclos’ upcoming Facades+ PERFORMANCE conference. But don’t forget about the exciting keynote-speakers headlining day one! Industry leaders Stefan Behnisch of Benisch Architekten and Gerardo Salinas of Rojkind Arquitectos will set the tone as they discuss the effects of emerging design, fabrication, and construction techniques on building facades in our current technological, environmental, and economic landscape. Leading innovators from across the AEC industry will be on-hand to redefine sustainable facade performance, so don’t miss this rare opportunity. Register now and mark it down on your calendar: Facades+ PERFORMANCE, October 24th-25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Main Campus in Chicago.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home” Opens Today at the Brooklyn Museum

East, On View
Friday, September 20, 2013
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(Courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

(Courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898
Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY
September 20–January 12, 2014

Within a hundred years of the Spanish empire first expanding its borders into the Americas, an abundance of incredible wealth had been amassed in the New World. This September, Brooklyn Museum is opening its doors and inviting visitors into an elite Spanish Colonial home. They will be showcasing extravagant domestic collections, which give insight into the private lives and power struggles of Spain’s New World Elite. Behind Closed Doors, will include paintings, sculptures, luxury goods from everyday life, manuscripts, textiles, and decorative objects. The exhibition explores themes that include representations of the indigenous and Creole elite, rituals in the home, the sala de estrado (women’s sitting room), the bedchamber, and social identity through material culture. The Brooklyn Museum began acquiring domestic Spanish colonial art in 1941 and now the collection ranks among the finest in the nation. This is the first major exhibition in the United States to explore the private lives and interiors of Spain’s New World elite. Richard Aste, Curator of European Art, organized Behind Closed Doors, which is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue co-published by the Museum and the Monacelli Press.

Situ Fabrication Cracks Google’s Code

Fabrikator
Friday, September 20, 2013
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator

 
Situ Fabrication crafted 27 12-foot-panels for the lobby of Google's New York City office. (courtesy Situ Fabrication)

Situ Fabrication crafted 27 12-foot-tall triangulated panels for the lobby of Google’s New York City office. (courtesy Situ Fabrication)

HLW’s binary design for Google’s New York office supports the company’s product offerings.

Google is renowned in design circles for its unique offices around the globe, and the main lobby of the Internet search giant’s New York City office is no exception. Architecture firm HLW took its inspiration for the design of the space from Google’s Code of Conduct. The architects rendered the document’s stipulations in binary code, and applied those perforations on a series of 27, 12-foot-tall triangulated aluminum wall panels. This digital-age design feature is a nod to Google’s domain as well as to the process by which the panels themselves were created.

Brooklyn-based Situ Fabrication, the newly established fabrication arm of Situ Studio, worked with HLW to achieve a monolithic appearance across each of the 27 panels. Since the design called for “folded-looking planes,” Situ Fabrication opted to work with 1/8-inch-thick aluminum composite material (ACM) for ease of manipulation and the clean edges that the material would produce when processed on wood working machines. To reinforce the ACM sheets, Situ designed and fabricated a triangulated frame from welded aluminum tubing, resulting in a 2-inch-thick panel section. Read More

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