Public Transit back to 1956 levels of usage

National, Transportation
Wednesday, March 12, 2014
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Public transit

(Courtesy Wilson Santos/flickr)

The U.S. has finally caught up to 1956. With the help of 146 million more people, the country has finally managed to match the number of trips American’s took on mass transit 57 years ago. Largely skirting the population elephant in the corner the American Public Transport Administration released a reported revealing some 10.7 billion trips were taken on US public transportation in 2013.

More after the jump.

A Desert Oasis by assemblageSTUDIO

Architecture, Envelope, West
Wednesday, March 12, 2014
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tresARCA's facade reflects the colors and textures of its desert environment. (Bill Timmerman)

tresARCA’s facade reflects the colors and textures of its desert environment. (Bill Timmerman)

Capped by a protective steel mesh screen, tresARCA house is built for indoor/outdoor living.

There are two ways to live with Las Vegas’ harsh climate. The first, epitomized by the hermetically-sealed tract houses ringing the Strip, rejects the reality of the desert in favor of air conditioning and architecture evoking far-off places. The second strategy embraces the environment for what it is, and looks to the natural world for cues about how to adapt. In their tresARCA house, assemblageSTUDIO took the latter approach. Glass and granite punctuated by a folded steel screen surrounding the second-floor bedrooms, tresARCA’s facade is a meditation on the resilience of the desert landscape. Read More

BIG Reveals New Concrete Plan For Kimball Art Center After First Design Rejected by Public

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
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BIG's new plan lifts up to reveal a glassy entrance. (Kimball Art Museum)

BIG’s new plan lifts up to reveal a glassy entrance. (Courtesy BIG / Kimball Art Center)

Thanks in large part to public protest, Bjarke Ingelsplans for a twisted, log-cabin-like box for Park City’s Kimball Art Center have been dramatically changed. Earlier this month Ingels’ firm BIG unveiled a new design: a concrete wedge lifting 46 feet above the corner of Main and Heber Streets. “The building seems to rise with Main Street and the mountain landscape, while bowing down to match the scale of the existing Kimball,” Ingels said in a statement.

Continue reading after the jump.

PeopleForBikes Issues Green Light For Six Cities Seeking Improved Bike Infrastructure

A list of over 100 cities has been whittled down to six. PeopleForBikes has announced the latest cities that will be the focus of the 2014 iteration of the Green Lane Project, an initiative that promotes urban bike infrastructure.

More after the jump.

Ta-da!: Ando Tipped for New York Condos

Development, East
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
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TADAO ANDO-Atelier in Oyodo, Osaka, Japan & Meeting Clients

The architect examining a model of the building. (Courtesy Tadao Ando Architect and Associates)

Tadao Ando appears set to realize his first ground-up residential project in New York City. Andrew Luck’s favorite will be designing eight condominiums in a building to be located on a Nolita corner currently occupied by a parking garage.

An image of the location after the jump.

Bye-Bye Art Barn: Rice University to Demolish Martel Center Building

Art, Eavesdroplet, Southwest
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
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(Courtesy Glasscock School of Continuing Studies at Rice)

(Courtesy Glasscock School of Continuing Studies at Rice)

Texas art website Glasstire.com has confirmed the rumor that Rice University intends to demolish the Martel Center building—more informally known as the Art Barn. The corrugated metal structure was commissioned by John and Dominique de Menil in 1969 to house the Rice Museum, a predecessor of The Menil Collection.

The utilitarian structure inspired the “tin house” movement that gained some momentum in Houston’s West End neighborhood in the 1970s.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Portuguese architect Ines Lobo wins second annual arcVision prize

Awards, International, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
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Single family house in Magoito

A single family house in Magoito designed by 2014 arcVision prize winner Ines Lobo (Courtesy Ines Lobo)

The 2014 arcVision Prize, an international architecture award for female designers, was bestowed upon Ines Lobo. The Portuguese architect emerged from a short list of 21 nominees representing 15 countries. Lobo has focused the majority of her practice on her native country, where she also teaches at the Autonoma University in Lisbon. Since founding her own firm in 2002, Lobo has been most prolific in the public realm, designing the Art and Architecture Facility for Evora University and a number of secondary schools throughout Portugal. Anna Heringer of Switzerland, Shimul Javeri Kadri of India and Cecilia Puga from Chile were also tabbed for special mention. Brazilian architect Carla Juaçaba was the recipient of the inaugural arcVision Prize after Italcementi created the award in 2013.

Transforming an Austrian Construction Site into a Choreographed Dance

International, Lighting
Monday, March 10, 2014
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Turns out the biggest construction site in Europe has got some moves. And all it takes to turn 42 cranes into a nimble-bodied dance troupe is some light choreography, a techno beat, and a fair amount of neon lighting.  The dance, or the Krenasee event as it is officially known, took place in Austria last month at the site of a planned 20,000-square-foot suburb called Urban Lakeside Vienna. FilmSpektakel caught the action in all of its glory and put together this impressive time-lapse video. [Via Gizmodo.]

Michael Kimmelman Wins Municipal Art Society’s Brendan Gill Prize

Awards, East, Media, Shft+Alt+Del
Monday, March 10, 2014
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Michael Kimmelman. (Wikimedia Commons)

Michael Kimmelman. (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

The Municipal Art Society (MAS) has announced that New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman has been awarded the 2014 Brendan Gill Prize. The award will be officially presented by MAS President Vin Cipolla and Board Chair Genie Birch on March 25th. The annual cash prize is named in honor of the late New Yorker theater and architecture critic.

“Michael’s insightful candor and continuous scrutiny of New York’s architectural environment is journalism at its finest, and in solid alignment with the high standards of Brendan himself,” MAS President Vin Cipolla said in a statement. The jury was particularly impressed with Kimmelman’s calls to drastically improve Penn Station.

Is that Musk in the Air? Electric Car, Space Guru Has Plans For Texas

Eavesdroplet, Southwest
Monday, March 10, 2014
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Diagram of the Tesla Model S showing its battery pack. (Courtesy Tesla Motors)

Diagram of the Tesla Model S showing its battery pack. (Courtesy Tesla Motors)

Speaking of rumors, Texas Monthly spread the word that Silicon Valley billionaire visionary Elon Musk may be locating facilities for two of his future-looking companies in the Lone Star State. Musk’s SpaceX has been buying up land in Cameron County in South Texas with the implicit purpose of building a space facility on the site to launch an expedition to Mars. In more terrestrial affairs, the South Africa native is also considering building a battery factory in the state for his electric car company, Tesla Motors.

Bloomberg News Cuts Cultural Coverage Including Architecture Critic James Russell

Media, National, Shft+Alt+Del
Monday, March 10, 2014
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(Courtesy Design Trust)

James Russell. (Courtesy Design Trust)

The every diminishing ranks of architecture critics suffered another loss, as Bloomberg News cut James Russell’s column, as a part of a larger reorganization/elimination of its cultural coverage. According to a post on Russell’s personal blog, Bloomberg is focusing on luxury and lifestyle coverage over arts and culture coverage.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pioneering British Supermarket Appears Destined for an Early Demise

SAINSBURY6

(Courtesy Chetwoods Architects)

A British supermarket once lauded for its ingenuity and pioneering nature is now on the chopping block with a Swedish invader looming. When it was completed, the Greenwich branch of UK Mega-chain Sainsbury’s was hailed as a breakthrough in eco-design and shortlisted for a prestigious Stirling Prize. Yet in early March the city council approved plans to demolish the structure in order to pave the way for a new IKEA warehouse outlet.

Read More

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