Through The Channel, Darkly

Other
Tuesday, May 12, 2009
.

We’ve blogged about the oil infrastructure in and around Houston, Texas, a couple of times: here and here. But we hadn’t managed to get a level view of the massive installation until stumbling across ship pilot Louis Vest’s time lapse video of a nighttime trip down the Houston Ship Channel aboard a 600-foot-long Panamax tanker. Vest strapped his NIkon D700 camera to an outside rail and programmed it to capture an image every six seconds, documenting a 3 1/2-hour journey cruising at 5 to 10 knots through this gloaming industrial landscape of exhaust stacks, burning lights, and gas flares. Mmmmm… Creamy!

UPDATE: Guangzhou Opera House Fire

Other
Monday, May 11, 2009
.

A rendering of the Opera House interior. (Images courtesy zahahadidblog.com)

A spokesman for Zaha Hadid Architects sent AN the following statement on the condition of the building following the fire: Read More

Hadid Opera House Burns

Other
Monday, May 11, 2009
.

Picture of the blaze from the Chinese media (courtesy abbs.com.cn)

AN has learned of a fire at Guangzhou Opera House. The project, designed by Zaha Hadid with a web-like exoskeleton, includes an 1,800-seat theater as well as a multipurpose hall and support facilities. The building was set to open this fall. Read More

File Under: Trick

Other
Friday, May 8, 2009
.

Yesterday, the Observer alerted us to the LMDC’s monthly progress report, which abashedly admits that Deutsche Bank deconstruction won’t be complete until January of next year. And to think, we’d been promised just this January it would be gone by Halloween. To wit: Read More

Eisenman Says West is Best

Other
Friday, May 8, 2009
.

Michael Graves, David Childs, and Peter Eisenman share a laugh at the Urban Center.

Michael Graves, David Childs, and Peter Eisenman share a laugh at the Urban Center.


On May 4 at the Urban Center, Peter Eisenman and Michael Graves had a conversation, moderated by David Childs, about their favorite books to inaugurate the exhibition, Unpacking My Library. In the light of the current crisis that the print media is experiencing, listening to these legendarily erudite bibliophiles was a rare privilege. But the evening was not without controversy. Read More

The FiveThirtyEight on Traffic

Other
Thursday, May 7, 2009
.

(Bryan Christie Design for Esquire)

In a feature for Esquire, number cruncher and future predictor Nate Silver ponders the continuing decline in per capital vehicle miles traveled. Americans are driving less. Significantly less, in spite of major drops in gas prices since last year. Certainly the economy has something to do with this. Fewer people are driving to work since few people have jobs. But Silver doesn’t think the economy explains the decline. Read More

At Home in Dystopia

Other
Thursday, May 7, 2009
.

J.G. Zimmerman, Dystopia Series: Suburbia (all images courtesy of the respective artists.)

Friend of AN Jeremiah Joseph visited an exhibition of interest in New York’s gallery district.

Et in Arcadia Ego, a new exhibition at the Thornton Room in Chelsea, examines the intersection and overlap of natural and man-made landscapes. With the title, roughly translated from Latin, “I am in pastoral utopia,” the show, curated by Blanca de la Torre and Juanli Carrion, could easily devolve into a Nature equals Good, City equals Bad equation. Instead, the way the six artists explore the topic is not so divisive or stale. The work tends to engage the subject from the side, generating surreal results. At the end any answers are farther off than before viewing the work, and this ambiguity is show’s strength. It prevents the viewer from standing too sure-footed and jumping ahead to conclusions and prejudices. Read More

A Desire Named Streetcars

Other
Tuesday, May 5, 2009
.
Whats missing?

What's missing? Us! (Infrastructurist)

Yesterday, our friends over at Infrastructurist put together this nifty map illustrating the return of the streetcar to American pavement. One thing was conspicuously missing–or rather three things: “our” fair cities New York, LA, and San Francisco. Read More

Dislocation, Dislocation, Dislocation

Other
Tuesday, May 5, 2009
.

Twilight in the financial district. The view from the cupola at 48 Wall Street. (Photos: Douglas Back/Lower Manhattan Cultural Council)

The mood was decidedly anti-Wall Street among the crowd who gathered on April 28 for the final lecture in Access Restricted, a series sponsored by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council exploring the relationship between finance and city design. We were packed into one of the Street’s oldest strongholds: 48 Wall St., the site where Alexander Hamilton established the country’s first bank in 1789, though the current building dates from 1928. As the sun set, we were told we would be taken up to the cupola for a rare view of “twilight on Wall Street,” prompting one audience member to call out, “Is that metaphorical?” to widespread titters.
Read More

Getting Smarter By The Day

Other
Monday, May 4, 2009
.

Siemens' Sitraffic Scala traffic management system

The New York Times last week reported on “Smart Infrastructure,” or computer-controlled systems (energy grids, highways, trains, food distribution, health records, water systems, etc)  that could increase efficiency and save millions of dollars. I.B.M, for instance, has had success monitoring congestion pricing in places like Stockholm and London, it’s improving management for bus and train systems worldwide, and it’s working with food producers to limit the billions worth of food that are thrown away every year. So the U.S. is creating much of the innovative technology, but other countries have been first to implement it. Well one for two isn’t bad.. The good news: On April 30 IBM announced $2 billion in financing to make such systems more easily available for stimulus-related projects in the U.S.

Filed Under: 

Escape From Moscone Center

Other
Saturday, May 2, 2009
.

Sand Studio's South Park Residence

One of the highlights of visiting the AIA Convention has been leaving the convention hall to see some of the wonderful new architecture in San Francisco. We got to see favorites like Daniel Libeskind’s new Jewish Museum, Herzog & De Meuron’s De Young, and Renzo Piano’s Academy of Sciences. But perhaps more unique were the AIA SF Home tours, where we could step inside homes otherwised closed to the public. Two highlights were in the lovely South Park Neighborhood: the Gallery House, by Ogrydziak/Prillinger Architects and the South Park Residence + Studio by Sand Studios. Both are studies in contrast. The first, which boasts a world class art collection and a visually interconnected series of vertical spaces, contrasts huge exposed steel beams with pristine white art-ready walls. The second combines the exposed concrete and wood of an old warehouse space with sophisticated, and layered modern finishes.

Read More

Wish You Were Here?

Other
Friday, May 1, 2009
.

The AIA Annual Convention, coming to you live from the Moscone Center... and online. (Sam Lubell)

If you couldn’t make it out San Francisco for the AIA Convention this weekend (if you did, be sure to say hi to Sam and the rest of the gang), don’t fret. The Institute has been kind enough to set up streaming video of many of the lectures and events, and you can even earn credits for it. Sure, you’ll miss all the fun after-parties, like our own, but it also beats flying coach.

Page 437 of 458« First...102030...435436437438439...450...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License