Artecnica’s Showroom Opens in LA

Other
Saturday, October 11, 2008
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A shiny new showroom on San Vicente

A shiny new showroom on San Vicente

The socially-reponsible design squad at Artecnica opened their first showroom in Los Angeles last night and designers, architects and artists thronged the simple white storefront in appreciation. Well, and for a glimpse of flower-power designer Tord Boontje during his second-ever visit to LA (even though he’s been working with Artecnica for ages). Gracious hostess Tahmineh Javanbakht greeted guests near the bar, her neck layered with chains, charms, beads and bangles to glamorous effect, while Rose Apodaca presided over a pop-up version of boutique A+R in the back. Read More

Columntrava

Other
Friday, October 10, 2008
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courtesy Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

courtesy Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

This week, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PA) and Santiago Calatrava released renderings of the scaled back World Trade Center Transportation Hub. Read More

Nature Boy

Other
Wednesday, October 8, 2008
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all images courtesy Johnson Trading Gallery

all images courtesy Johnson Trading Gallery

The young British designer Max Lamb, the subject of a solo show at Johnson Trading Gallery in Hudson Square that opens today, creates furniture with rugged natural materials—blocks of stone, molten metals, beach sand—and various methods of hand-working. The results reflect a distinctive and surprisingly contemporary sensibility. Read More

Landscapers Short On Green, Too

Other
Monday, October 6, 2008
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stella.errante/Courtesy Flickr

stella.errante/Courtesy Flickr

We’ve been tracking the AIA Architecture Billings Index ever since it took a dive last spring. But what about the rest of the design industry? Well, the American Society of Landscape Architects released its quarterly survey of member firms, and the numbers are no better than their brick-and-mortar friends.

In fact, the numbers are even worse, with only 16 percent of firms experiencing growth in their billings and 43 percent having stable or rising inquiries. Read More

After the flood

Other
Monday, October 6, 2008
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On September 14, the Farnsworth House was engulfed by the Fox River, sustaining significant damage to its interiors and furnishings. The house, designed by Mies van der Rohe and now a National Trust Historic Site, is reopen for tours through October 29 to benefit the restoration. According to a new blog covering the effort, estimates for repairs are still being tallied.

While restoration work is proceeding, some suggest that the house should be moved to a more secure location.

Jitters? AIA to the Rescue

Other
Friday, October 3, 2008
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As the economic crisis continues to reverberate across the globe, everyone is feeling uneasy. Architects are particularly susceptible because the downturn stems from the housing collapse, which has crept into most ever sector of the construction industry.

Not to worry (too much). Last week, the AIA launched Navigating the Economy, a special webpage aimed at, well, helping architects navigate the economy during this time of uncertainty. Read More

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Welcome to the MAD House

East Coast, Other
Thursday, October 2, 2008
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Everybody dance now. The lobby of the new MAD.

Everybody dance now. The lobby of the new MAD.

The Museum of Art and Design held its reception for architects and designers last Friday, and while the tchotke-lined galleries were packed with fancypants and fancy glasses, AN did not spot too many boldfaces–perhaps everyone was home warming up their popcorn for the debate. We did see Barry Bergdoll, Matilda McQuade, and Karen Stein and even asked a few people what they thought of Brad Cloepfil‘s resplendent new digs. Read More

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MAD (Re)cap

Other
Wednesday, October 1, 2008
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Hélène Binet

Few buildings have sparked as much architectural criticism as Two Columbus Circle, the new home of the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD). Brad Cloepfil’s firm Allied Works has designed the new museum, set within the bones of Edward Durrell Stone’s old building. Critical reaction has been split, though the MAD haters seem to outnumber the fans. Read More

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Anti Sprawl/ Pro Transit… in California??!!

Other
Wednesday, October 1, 2008
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This.. is....SPRAWL

This.. is....SPRAWL

After weeks of waiting, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger finally passed anti-sprawl bill SB 375 into law today, reports the LA Times. Among other things the measure will reward sustainable, dense, and transit-oriented communities with more state funds and will also discourage development on valuable untouched land. It will also call for state agencies to study new developments’ effects on transit patterns and on greenhouse gas emissions.

Next up: Measure R, Read More

Recycle Buildings, not Ideas

Other
Monday, September 29, 2008
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Making lists is a time-honored September New York ritual as we all trash the beach reading and play serious catch-up as quickly as possible, reading back-to-back The New York Times’ The New Season feature on September 7 followed by New York magazine’s Fall Preview (Don’t be confused by cover dates, the Times’ Sunday edition came out one day ahead).

And now, to New York architecture critic Justin Davidon’s worthy and lengthy survey of new glass buildings across the city “Glass Stampede” (of which we read every word on a long flight recently), there is Nicolai Ouroussoff’s tossed-off and irresponsible “New York City, Tear Down These Walls”. Maybe the guy should be applying the principles of adaptive reuse to architecture rather than to his journalism.

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Gerson’s Ground Zero Gambit

Other
Friday, September 26, 2008
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Alan Gerson, the City Council rep for Lower Manhattan, issued a major statement today along with the Lower Manhattan Redevelopment Committee, which he chairs. The statement lays out 17 demands the committee feels will ensure the timely opening of the memorial plaza by Septmber 11, 2011. It opens with an imposing if realistic appraisal of the challenges dogging the project so far:

The World Trade Center site is one of the most technically complicated modern construction projects ever undertaken: the building of five high rise towers, concomitantly, on a sixteen acre site over two train lines; issues of unprecedented toxicities and missing human remains; all in the middle of a bustling residential and business district. The architects, engineers and workers on the ground deserve credit for the performance of a difficult task, and interruptions, unexpected technical problems and delays should have been anticipated from its inception.

Gerson said that with the economy faltering, Read More

More Mint Milano

Other
Thursday, September 25, 2008
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Following our report on the Porta Nuova project, developed by Hines in Milan, Grimshaw has released new images of their Exhibition Hall, an anchor in the development’s Garibaldi section. The Exhibition Hall features a dramatic metal skin draped over the building’s roof and walls, which peels into ribbon-like forms to reveal the structure within. The building follows the contours of the site, creating an “urban sculpture,” according to a statement by the architects. The piazza-facing entrance is fully glazed, revealing the activity inside and helping to animate the public space. A top floor restaurant will lead to a large roof terrace with commanding views of the Alps. Like all of Porta Nuova, the Exhibition Hall will be built to LEED standards.

Read More

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