Ladies Man

Other
Friday, June 12, 2009
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Architects and apprentices in the Taliesin West drafting room, ca. 1962 (Courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, Taliesin West)

On Wednesday night, the Guggenheim brought together the women behind the man, and apparently the myth of Frank Lloyd Wright, in a program titled “The Architecture of Wright: Wright, Women & Narrative.”

Co-organized with the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation, the lecture was accompanied by the premiere of A Girl Is A Fellow Here: 100 Women Architects in the Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright, a 15-minute documentary film produced by the Foundation. Throughout his career, Wright employed over 100 women architects and designers, and the film focuses on the lives of six of these women, including Marion Mahony, Isabel Roberts, Lois Gottlieb, Jane Duncombe, Eleanore Petterson, and Read Weber, who worked alongside Wright during his prolific career from his Oak Park offices to Taliesin West. Read More

Come To The Cabaret

Other
Thursday, June 11, 2009
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Last night we had the pleasure of checking out Last Remaining Seats, the L.A. Conservancy’s series of classic films inside the historic theatres of Los Angeles. Last night featured Cabaret, starring Liza Minelli and Michael York (York gave the introduction to the event) in the unmatchable Los Angeles Theater, a huge baroque palace on Broadway full of crystal chandeliers and impossibly ornate details. Guests were even welcome to visit the crusty old projection room (with its ancient dials and dressing room), the windswept rooftop, the subterranean ballroom, and the luxurious bathrooms. Other classic theaters hosting the event in other weeks include the Orpheum and the Million Dollar, which have been restored in recent years, and host music, theater, and even church services. More pictures of the festivities here: Read More

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Deal or No Deal?

Other
Thursday, June 11, 2009
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Will the MTA allow Forest City Ratner to under pay for the Atlantic Avenue rail yards? (Courtesy Daylife)

Will the MTA allow Forest City Ratner to under pay for the Atlantic Avenue rail yards? (Courtesy Daylife)

Maybe Forest City Ratner won’t get a deal on the MTA rail yards after all.

A major part of Develop Don’t Destroy Brooklyn’s strategy for putting the final nail in Atlantic Yards’ coffin is challenging the ethicality (and legality) of an apparent agreement to allow Ratner to pay less than the agreed-upon $100 million for the rail yards atop which the Atlantic Yards are to rise. DDDB hopes the agreement will be released in advance of a hearing on the matter on June 24, something we inquired about for yesterday’s story. Today, the MTA responded, and depending on your perspective, it is either good news or bad for the project’s opponents. Read More

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In da COOLHAUS

Other
Thursday, June 11, 2009
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What happens when an ice cream-obsessed design writer meets two ice cream slinging architects? She makes a video! Our dear friend, colleague, and (now) hero Alissa Walker (aka Gelatobaby) recently swung by the COOLHAUS truck, where she chats with the two proprietors about the inspiration, construction, and popular explosion of their architecturally delicious desserts. One Cinnamoneo, please! (To find out where the truck’ll be, follow COOLHAUS on Twitter.)

Gehry Officially Gone

Other
Wednesday, June 10, 2009
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One of a handful of renderings of Ellerbe Beckets new plans for the arena that leaked to the Times. (Courtesy nytimes.com)

One of a handful of renderings of Ellerbe Becket's new plans for the arena that leaked to the Times. (Courtesy nytimes.com)

As we wrote in  our story last week, Frank Gehry might not be involved with any buildings on the Atlantic Yards site and not just the arena. As a Forest City Ratner spokesperson told me, “Frank might design one of the buildings later, I don’t think it’s impossible. But right now, he is just the master planner.” Well, as of yesterday, WNYC reported that the it will be impossible after all: Read More

The Art Above

Other
Wednesday, June 10, 2009
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View of High Line looking South (Photos: Victoria Monjo)

As the first segment of The High Line opened to the public on Monday, the first public art commission to occupy the space was unveiled. Read More

Down The Drain In That Other Venice

Other
Wednesday, June 10, 2009
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Artist Mike Boucher was excited to bring American suburbia to the Venice Biennale, constructing a floating McMansion—complete with cheesy yellow vinyl siding—set to grace the city’s famed canals. Unfortunately the house tilted off a failed pontoon and sank; a disaster for the artist (who actually seems to find the whole thing hilarious), but a good symbol for our housing market back in the USA.

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Oh, James!

Other
Wednesday, June 10, 2009
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Not a bad table, really, though beware the PR trap. Its more dangerous than laser-wielding sharks. (Courtesy SUITE New York)

Not a bad table, really, though beware the PR trap. It's more dangerous than laser-wielding sharks. (Courtesy SUITE New York)

As you can probably imagine, we get some stupid, some silly, and some just jawdropping press releases around the office, especially for overly highly designed products. In a new blog feature called Bizarre PR, we’ll bring you the best of them. First up, SUITE New York’s Girevole table. Read More

Dry Line

Other
Wednesday, June 10, 2009
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DVFs High Line Towel

DVF's High Line Towel (Courtesy DVF)

Unless you’re living under a rock, you already know the High Line officially opened its first section to the public on Monday. One of its highly styled neighbors and our favorite designer happens to also be one of its biggest supporters, not just financially speaking! Read More

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Times Square, Slightly Tamed

Other
Tuesday, June 9, 2009
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(Katy Silberger/flickr)

I’m a Times Square avoider. It’s too crowded, clogged with slow moving tourists, for me to get where I need to go without being so frustrated that I swear to never return. On rare occasions, I succumb to the charm of the lights, but those moments are usually glimpsed from a distance, down a street corridor or out the window of a cab. But yesterday, on my way to an event in midtown, I chose to go through Times Square to see how it had changed since Department of Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan’s recent street closure plan had been implemented. Read More

In Turner We Truss

Other
Tuesday, June 9, 2009
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My In Detail article in the current issue covers Rafael Moneo’s Northwest Corner Building at Columbia University. In addition to filling the final vacancy in the 1890 McKim, Mead & White master plan, the building had to bridge a subterranean recreation center with a 120-foot clear span. In answer, Moneo—along with executive architect Davis Brody Bond Aedas and structural engineer Arup—designed the building’s steel framing system as one big truss, with diagonal members bolstering the perimeter moment frame. The majority of the gravity loads, however, are supported by three gargantuan trusses that run the length of the building four levels above the street. These trusses are so big and heavy that Turner Construction had to assemble them on site, on a shed built above the sidewalk, and then slide them into place. The above stop-action video was also assembled by the construction manager, documenting its elegant solution to this seriously heavy erection.

Fleeting Image

Other
Monday, June 8, 2009
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Something New, Something Old: The TKTS Booth has brought new life to Times Square. The absence of cars, however, just might rob it from photographs. (Paúl Rivera/Archphoto

Something New, Something Old: The TKTS Booth has brought new life to Times Square. The absence of cars, however, just might rob it from photographs. (Paúl Rivera/Archphoto)

Today we got an email from the fine folks at Archphoto announcing that one of its trio of photographers, Paúl Rivera, has been featured in the current issue of the Japanese architecture magazine, A+U. The featured work was of the MASterworks award-winning TKTS Booth, including the above photo. In addition to being an unexpected and breathtaking view of the structure and surrounding environs, it made us realize something we hadn’t yet about the much-talked about closure of Broadway in the square: While all those cars whizzing by may have been a pedestrian and congestion nightmare, they sure brought wonderful life to the countless photos that have come to define the Crossroads of the World.

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