Construction Starts on Massive Mixed-Use Development On the D.C. Waterfront

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

Aerial Rendering of the Project. (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

After  nearly a decade of planning, a $2 billion, three-million-square-foot mixed-use development is underway on Washington D.C.’s Southwest waterfront. In March, construction started on Phase 1 of The Wharf, a project that is being developed by Hoffman-Madison Waterfront and designed by Perkins-Eastman. The new neighborhood will have marinas, green space, entertainment venues, and plenty of retail, residential, and hotel space.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> How Team Interboro Would Protect Nassau County’s South Shore

Interboro's Living by the Bay proposal. (Courtesy Interboro)

Interboro’s Living by the Bay proposal. (Courtesy Interboro)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s the plan proposed by Interboro Partners’ team.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rebuild By Design> MIT’s Plan to Save New Jersey and Metropolitan New York

MIT's proposed site. (Courtesy MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism)

MIT’s proposed site. (Courtesy MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Hurricane Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, here is a closer look at each of the final ten proposals, beginning with the team led by MIT.

Continue reading after the jump.

On Second Try, Robert Stern’s Proposal for Philly’s American Revolution Museum Approved

Development, East, Newsletter
Monday, April 7, 2014
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Stern's new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Stern’s new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects)

Weeks after the Philly Art Commission slammed Robert Stern’s proposal for the Museum for the American Revolution, he’s back with a new design. And good news for the starchitect—the commission likes it. They really, really like it. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the new plan was unanimously approved and building permits should be issued in the next few months. Unsurprisingly, Stern‘s altered design does not include the features, which the Commission called “Disneyesque.”

See the old design after the jump.

Barclays Center’s Bald Spot to Get Green-Roof Toupee

The Barclays Center green roof. (Courtesy SHoP Architects)

The Barclays Center green roof. (Courtesy SHoP Architects)

Over one-hundred-thousand-square-feet of sedum will be implanted into the Barclays Center’s massive, logo-emblazoned, bald-spot of a roof. According to the Wall Street Journal, SHoP is designing the green topper for the one billion dollar arena. Plans for a public green space on top of the arena date back over a decade, but were later scrapped due to cost constraints.

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Planner Friends of Dorothy: Chicago Launches LGBT Urban Planning Social Group

Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Monday, April 7, 2014
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(Courtesy Moxie)

(Courtesy Moxie)

Chicago’s urban planning history is epic and, therefore, it’s no surprise that the city draws young folks fresh out of school with their MUPs, MPAs, and MPPs in droves (yours truly was one these eight years ago). However, Eavesdrop had no clue how many of them were gay until a couple weeks ago. A young buck, Daniel Ronan—fresh (meat) off the boat from Portland, Oregon—started an LGBT social group for planner and policy folks called Moxie. The inaugural meeting, which took place at Hubbard Inn, was well-attended, including not one, but two AN contributors and Dr. Curtis Winkle, the department head at UIC’s College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs. And some hot guy from our gym whom Eavesdrop didn’t know was a planner—heyyy!

The next meetup takes place on Thursday, April 17 at the Vinyl Lounge Chicago. RSVP here.

Port Authority Wants New Tower and $400 Million Bus Terminal Annex in Manhattan

The Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Rose Trinh / Flickr)

The Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Rose Trinh / Flickr)

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey has big plans for Manhattan’s West-side bus terminal. In an attempt to cut congestion on the hell-forsaken crowded streets of Hell’s Kitchen, the authority is planning a $400 million bus annex a few blocks from the main 42nd Street Bus Terminal. And to improve that hell-forsaken battered terminal, they are reportedly resurrecting plans to build a tower on top of it—the funds from which would be used to improve the facility.

Continue reading after the jump.

Annual Ranking Lists the Top Architecture & Design Exhibitions of 2013

National
Friday, April 4, 2014
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Installation view of MoMA's 2013 exhibition Henri Labrouste: Structure Brought To Light. (Jonathan Muzikar / Courtesy MoMA)

Installation view of MoMA’s 2013 exhibition Henri Labrouste: Structure Brought To Light. (Jonathan Muzikar / Courtesy MoMA)

What was the most popular architecture or design exhibition in 2013? If you guessed MoMA’s Le Corbusier spectacular or SFMOMA’s landmark Lebbeus Woods: Architect (coming to New York’s Drawing Center April 15) you’re close but off the mark. In fact the most popular architecture exhibition in the world, according to The Art Newspaper‘s 2013 Visitors Figures was MoMA’s Henri Labrouste exhibition that drew 438,680 viewers (4,100 a day) compared to the Le Corbusier show that had 405,000 visitors (4,010 a day).

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Holl’s Pricey New Library in Queens Must Tone it Down a Notch

Development, East, News, Newsletter
Friday, April 4, 2014
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Rendering for Hunters Point Community Library. (Courtesy Steven Holl Architects)

Rendering for Hunters Point Community Library. (Courtesy Steven Holl Architects)

Looks like Steven Holl’s impressive design for a new library in Queens, New York costs quite a bit more than expected. DNA Info reported that bids for the 21,000-square-foot project came in about $10-20 million over budget. But that doesn’t mean the project is dead just yet. While the city has nixed a planned geothermal heating and cooling system, is swapping customized interior fixtures for standard ones, and is replacing the aluminum façade with painted concrete, they say the library will stay true to its original design.

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Designing Tomorrow’s Facades Today

One of six Dialog Workshops will focus on the use of glass fiber reinforced concrete in facade design, as in the Broad Museum. (Courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

One of six Dialog Workshops will focus on the use of glass fiber reinforced concrete in facade design, as in the Broad Museum. (Courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

Innovations in building envelope design typically take one of two forms. The first concerns the materials themselves, and the application of developments in the science of glass, metal, concrete, wood, and plastics to architecture. The second has to do with how the facade mediates between the building interior and the environment.

In a world of extreme weather events and rapid sociological change, architects must invent new ways to marry flexibility, resilience, and sustainability in facade design.

Continue reading after the jump.

Hooked on Fonts: Chicago Typographers Party Like They Just Don’t Kern

Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Friday, April 4, 2014
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The typographic bunch. (Courtesy Typeforce 5)

The typographic bunch. (Courtesy Typeforce 5)

Apparently, Chicagoans are bonkers for typography. Jeff Sanchez, Graphic Design Manager for the International Interior Design Association, invited us to Typeforce 5, “the annual showcase of typographic all-stars.” Hosted by the Co-Prosperity Sphere down in Bridgeport, this was the most well attended opening we’ve been to in ages. Eavesdrop bumped into old AN pals, like local designer Michael Savona and Gravity Tank power players Robert Zolna and Moritsugu Kariya. Robert, Eavesdrop wouldn’t mind a new day job, so, if you hire us, rest-assured we’d never use Comic Sans or Chiller in communications with clients. Call us!

“SuralArk” Selected as Best Folly for Summer Installation at Socrates Sculpture Park

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

Socrates Sculpture Park and the Architectural League have selected Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold as the winners of their Folly 2014 competition. Commenced in earlier this year and launched in 2012, the contest’s name and theme derive from the 18th and 19th century Romantic practice of architectural follies, or structures with little discernible function that are typically sited within a garden or landscape. Austin and Mergold’s SuralArk was deemed the most deserving contemporary interpretation of the tradition, and will be erected within the park’s Long Island City confines by early May.

More after the jump.

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