Eavesdrop CA 05

Eavesdroplet
Friday, July 17, 2009
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A ROYAL BRUSH-OFF
Condé Nast’s Women’s Wear Daily reports that Jeffrey Nemeroff, Architectural Digest‘s longtime art director, has parted ways with the magazine following a contretemps with editor-in-chief Paige Rense: “Nemeroff, who like much of the magazine’s editorial staff is based in California, is also a painter who recently had a show at the Neuhoff Gallery in New York. In May, New York magazine’s Daily Intel blog reported that Rense had called designers to discourage them from attending Nemeroff’s opening and celebratory dinner. Rense told New York’s Steve Fishman that designers believed Architectural Digest was directly involved and felt pressured to purchase a painting. She also said she had been ‘blindsided’ by the event, though the gallery owner was quoted saying Rense had given the show her blessing months earlier.” Nemeroff is not talking, but others are. A couple of designers told Eavesdrop that “pressure” flows in both directions. They said that Rense “encourages” the inclusion of renowned color-field painter Kenneth Noland’s work in photo shoots for the magazine, and his work has appeared on at least one cover. (Noland is her husband.) Double-standard alert! Read More

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Unite de Stoop

East
Friday, July 17, 2009
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Children frolic on Le Corbusier's Unite d'Habitation in 1959. (Rene Burri/Magnum Photos/Slate)

Children frolic on Le Corbusier's Unite d'Habitation in 1959. (Rene Burri/Magnum Photos/Slate).

In today’s “Today’s Pictures” feature over on Slate, Magnum presents photos of a subject near and dear to New Yorkers’ summertime hearts: stoops. Many of the photos, including some by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Bruce Davidson, feature the environs of our fair city. But the one pic that really caught our attention was from Marseilles, where Rene Burri snapped some children at play on the patio of Le Corbusier’s Unite d’Habitation. Modern architecture never looked so fun.

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Landscape Architects to Invade Chicago

Midwest
Friday, July 17, 2009
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Aerial view of Chicagos Millennium Park (Courtesy The Art Institute of Chicago)

Aerial view of Chicago's Millennium Park (Courtesy The Art Institute of Chicago)

In spite of the down economy, on Wednesday, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) released an official statement that cited an increased number of registrants for this year’s Landscape Architecture Meeting and Expo in Chicago. Read More

To Every Season

East
Friday, July 17, 2009
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The Pool Room at the Four Seasons (photos courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)

The Pool Room at the Four Seasons (photos courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)

Wednesday night the Guggenheim held a benefit dinner to honor the fiftieth anniversaries of the Wright museum and of the Four Seasons restaurant. During dessert Guggenheim Director Richard Armstrong interviewed Phyllis Lambert and critic Martin Filler about the two architects, though Lambert held sway for most of the conversation. Read More

Remembering Julius Shulman

West
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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Julius Shulman and his camera. (Dan Winter/Courtesy LAMag.com)

Julius Shulman and his camera. (Dan Winter/Courtesy LAMag.com)

As you may have learned by now, renowned architectural photographer Julius Shulman died Wednesday night at age 98. (You can read our obituary here.) We encourage you to share memories, thoughts, and impressions of one of the most influential figures to ever engage with the built environment. Just leave a comment below. To start things off, we’ve posted the trailer to the forthcoming documentary about the great photographer, Visual Acoustics, by Eric Bricker. It was moving to watch even before this sad news, but now it really puts into perspective–almost as well as his own photos–the sheer genius that was Julius Shulman. You can watch it after the jump. Read More

Didya Hear the One About Pitetsbkrrh?

East
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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Ask anyone from Pittsburgh (present company included) what the blinking light atop the Grant Building is, and they’ll quickly respond, “Easy! It spells out Pittsburgh in morse code.” Well, not exactly. Turns out a local grad student who also happens to be a ham radio operator was up on Mount Washington for the annual 4th of July fireworks (of which we have the best, courtesy the great Zambelli family). While he waited for the lights to go off, he was watching the red flashing light atop the Grant Building–the city’s first skyscraper when it was completed in 1929 and a wonderful art deco achievement by Henry Hornbostel–when he noticed something that didn’t belong. Read More

Drinking in History

East
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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Evolution of the Speakeasy, Barney Gallant’s “Speako de Luxe,” 1933 (Courtesy Museum of the City of New York)

Evolution of the Speakeasy, Barney Gallant’s “Speako de Luxe,” 1933 (Courtesy Museum of the City of New York)

Last night, the Museum of the City of New York hosted the first installment of their summer long prohibition-era themed parties on the newly renovated Polshek Partnership-designed terrace overlooking Central Park. Read More

An Urban Place to Park the Kids

Midwest
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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(photos by Brian Newman)

(photos by Brian Newman)

Architect and writer Brian Newman recently took a walk through St. Louis’ newest urban park and sent this dispatch.

Before setting foot in St. Louis’ downtown City Garden, which officially opened to the public last week, before you come across the bright red Keith Herring totem or Tom Otterness’ bulbous bronze Gepetto, even before you see its verdant paths and shaded lawns, you see the packs of happily damp children, wrapped in beach towels. There are children everywhere in City Garden, swimming in fountains and splashing under limestone framed waterfalls, playing in front of a huge interactive LED video wall and climbing on any one of the almost two dozen sculptures installed throughout the park. Read More

I Brought My Pencil

East
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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The fenestration of the East Harlem School was designed to let in ample daylight while creating a sheltered environment for the students. (Courtesy www.freelandarch.com)

The fenestration of the East Harlem School, seen here from a typical classroom, was designed to let in ample daylight while creating a sheltered environment for the students. (Courtesy www.freelandarch.com)

We have covered the East Harlem School a few times, once in a studio visit we did with the architect, Peter L. Gluck & Partners (09_05.21.2008), and once in our 2009 favorite sources issue (specifically here). Now construction on the project has been completed and Gluck has sent us some images of the finished product. According to the architect, who also provided construction management services, the school was built for $330 per square foot. Gluck also reports that his firm returned $500,000 to the client in unused contingencies. See what $330 per square foot will get you in Manhattan when your architect is also your CM after the jump. Read More

LA City Planning Smackdown

West
Thursday, July 16, 2009
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Only two weeks into his term, new LA City Attorney Carmen Trutanich has raised eyebrows after sending a sharply worded letter to the LA City Planning Commission over its approval of 40,000 square feet of billboards and outdoor signs on the Los Angeles Convention Center. (Last year, LA city council agreed to sell signage rights for the Convention Center to AEG, the owner of Staples Center and LA Live). Trutanich had opposed the move, and in his letter said that by “acting in haste,” the commission “undermined and jeopardized” the work of his office. Their decision to ignore his request, Trutanich also wrote, amounted to “an unfathomable lack of courtesy,” especially at a time when the city is trying to reduce sign numbers. He also added, “I will not hesitate to act in the future if it appears that you are aiding and abetting unlawful conduct despite my contrary advice.” In response LA Planning Commissioner Sean Burton told city council yesterday that he found Trutanich’s language “disturbing and frankly a little bit frightening.” He also said that Trutanich’s statement was “inappropriate” and “sounded like a threat.”  This is getting good…

The Rumble in Aspen

West
Wednesday, July 15, 2009
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Frank Gehry sat down with Tom Pritzker earlier this month at the Aspen Ideas Festival, of which a video was just posted on the Internet, and re-posted above for your viewing pleasure. How we found out about this was through the all-things-Ratner-Gehry-and-Times-related Atlantic Yards Report. Never one not to parse everything related to the above three–and our hats off to him for doing so–Norman Oder discovered the one contentious conversation of the otherwise lovely affair, when Gehry called no less eminent urban thinker Fred Kent of the Project for Public Spaces “a pompous man” for daring to question (admittedly repeatedly and somewhat annoyingly) Gehry’s placemaking skills. Yowza.

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Times Square Time Lapse

East
Wednesday, July 15, 2009
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My In Detail piece in the current issue is about Eleven Times Square, a speculative office tower at the corner of 8th Ave. and 42nd St., which was designed by FXFowle and is now in the final stages of construction. Lucky for you and me, Plaza Construction had the site photographed everyday for the past two years or so from the same vantage on a nearby tower, and has compiled these daily progress photos in the above stop-action video. There is much to admire in the presentation, but pay close attention to the erection of the structural elements. (Hint: The Tootsie Roll center of the Tootsie Pop goes up first.) Read More

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