Is the Shulman House for Sale?

West
Friday, December 18, 2009
.

Curbed LA reports that Julius Shulman’s house (above) in Laurel Canyon has been put on the market for $2.495 million. Shulman passed away this July, and his daughter Judy Mckee has been taking care of the house since. The steel frame three-bedroom, three-bath home, located at 7875 Woodrow Wilson Drive, was designed by famed Modernist architect Raphael Soriano.  It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1987, so at least its exterior can’t be altered. According to Redfin, the realtor is RE/MAX of Valencia.

Filed Under: ,

Origami Inspiration

International
Friday, December 18, 2009
.

The documentary Between the Folds is a brisk study of the intersection of intelligence and aesthetics in origami. The film, by the first time writer and director Vanessa Gould, gives an overview of the field, looks into the methods of folding, and interviews some of the big paper players of the past 50 years. Even with the film’s minor faults, Gould deserves enormous credit for producing a film that will fascinate everyone from precocious kids to high-minded architects. The film, the first on the subject in English, explores the combination of art, mathematics, diagrams, computational power, inspiration, and raw desire to create held within a simple piece of paper. Read More

TWBTA Take a Turn at Lincoln Center

East
Thursday, December 17, 2009
.

(photos courtesy Lincoln Center)

The redevelopment of Lincoln Center took another step forward today with the opening of the David Rubenstein Atrium. The space, redesigned by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects (TWBTA), includes two 21-foot high vertical gardens, skylit oculi, and a fountain to create a tranquil atmosphere in the passage way. Read More

Charge Me Up

East
Thursday, December 17, 2009
.
Beautiful Earths solar-powered charging station, with the company MINI E inside

Beautiful Earth's solar-powered charging station, with the company MINI E inside

As automakers vie to release the next generation of plug-in electric cars, many eco-conscious drivers have wondered about the lack of charging infrastructure in dense urban environments. Unlike in, say, London, where charging points are being planned within one mile of every citizen by 2015, New Yorkers have heard little about curbside electric pumps. Well, if you’re looking for a place to plug in your GM Volt, one company’s vision of the future has arrived. Read More

MTA: To Dig or Not to Dig?

East, East Coast
Wednesday, December 16, 2009
.
Sunset for the Z-train: The MTA could be ending express service on the JMZ line—and so much more—amid new budget shortfalls. (Courtesy Satans Landromat)

Sunset for the Z-train: The MTA could be ending express service on the JMZ line—and so much more—amid new budget shortfalls. (Courtesy Satan's Landromat)

Not since the collapse of Lehman Brothers last year has a major bastion in the city seemed to fall apart so quickly and readily as the MTA over the past few weeks. As the Times succinctly puts it, “state legislators cut $143 million out of the authority’s budget; state accountants then determined that a payroll tax dedicated to mass transit financing would produce $100 million less revenue than initially thought. Finally, late last week, a court ruled that the authority must pay significant raises to transit workers, adding tens of millions of dollars in expenses.” The MTA is required to fill the $400 million budget hole this created because it must end the year with a balanced budget. And so a range of service cuts were ratified today by the agency’s board, including the elimination of subway and bus lines, reduced off-peak service and para-transit, and no more free rides for half-a-million students. Read More

Journey From The Center Of CityCenter

West
Wednesday, December 16, 2009
.
Helmut Jahns Veer Towers at CityCenter

Helmut Jahn's Veer Towers at CityCenter.

And so it begins. MGM Mirage’s 67-acre, 18 million square foot, $7.8 billion CityCenter, one of the biggest  developments in the history of mankind, officially opened today. It includes buildings by Cesar Pelli, Daniel Libeskind, Rafael Viñoly, Helmut Jahn, KPF and Norman Foster. We can’t wait to put together our commentary. Here are some initial thoughts after our first day here: Read More

New Gams for Lever House

East
Wednesday, December 16, 2009
.

Richard Wood's "Port Sunlight" at Lever House (all photos: Amy Barkow courtesy Perry Rubenstein Gallery, New York)

The British artist Richard Woods is known for using patterns from historical sources such as Tudor architecture and the designs of William Morris in his Pop inflected works. His new installation at Lever House, entitled Port Sunlight, wraps the ground level elements at Gordon Bunshaft’s mid-century masterwork in vibrant panels, and while there isn’t a snowflake in sight the effect is festive. Read More

Light Walk With Me

East
Wednesday, December 16, 2009
.

In the above video, lighting designer Leni Schwendinger takes us on a light walk. Inspired by the Professional Lighting Designers Association’s LightMapping events, Schwendinger guides us through the nighttime streets of Greenwich Village, using her keen eye to observe and interpret the urban lighting conditions. What she reveals is a nuanced way of experiencing the city—New York or any place where electric light and the built environment can be found—after the sun goes down and is not to be missed. Enjoy.

The Final Slam Dunk?

East, East Coast
Tuesday, December 15, 2009
.
Forest City Ratner successfully sold bonds today, paving the way for construction of its new arena in Brooklyn.

Forest City Ratner successfully sold bonds today, paving the way for construction of its new arena in Brooklyn.

There may be a few hoops left to jump through before Bruce Ratner can begin construction of his SHoP- and Ellerbe Becket-designed arena for the Brooklyn, New Jersey, Nets, such as completing a partial sale of the team to a Russian oligarch, prevailing in some outstanding lawsuits, and going ahead with eminent domain against the area’s remaining holdouts. But the developer appears to have cleared the final major hurdle standing in his way with the successful sale of $511 million in tax-exempt bonds today for his $900 million arena. (There are still taxed bonds and an equity stake to be taken care of, but they lacked the December 31 deadline.) Read More

Bay Bridge Babylon

West
Tuesday, December 15, 2009
.
The new span of the Bay Bridge in progress. Photo by jitze on Flickr

The new Bay Bridge in progress. Photo by jitze/Flickr

Launching last Tuesday, Dave Eggers’ one-time-only Panorama newspaper celebrated the good old days of  investigative journalism with a muckraking piece on the Bay Bridge. Its “above-the-fold” piece, “Unparalleled Bridge, Unparalleled Cost” (which, unlike the rest of the issue, is available online), is a massive 22,000-word exploration into the bureaucratic issues that have caused the new Bay Bridge to be delayed for years and go from an original estimate of $1.8 billion to a final cost around $12 billion. Read More

Filed Under: ,

Kicked by the Curb

East, East Coast
Tuesday, December 15, 2009
.
Curbed calls Calatravas 80 South Street the biggest disappointment of the decade.

Curbed calls Calatrava's 80 South Street the biggest disappointment of the decade.

The recent building boom has proven to be as much about what got built—40s Bond and Mercer, One Bryant Park, the High Line—as what hasn’t—our Gehry Guggenheim, ample affordable housing, so much of the World Trade Center, not to mention Dubai. Our good pals at Curbed New York, so often trafficking in our real estate dreams and nightmares, have put together a run-down of their top 10 projects that never got built. Read More

R.I.P., I.D.

National
Tuesday, December 15, 2009
.
(Image Courtesy I.D. Magazine)

(Image Courtesy I.D. Magazine)

To get a brief taste of a world short one more smart design magazine, type ID Magazine into the search field. You might get i-D with a bunch of nude blondes on the cover or id magazine at the ready to discuss transgender issues in Oregon, but you will not easily find I.D., the magazine that has covered the art of design and the design of the everyday for more than 50 years, winning five National Magazine Awards in the process. While nobody who wanted to know the new brand names in the making dared miss I.D.’s Annual Design Review every July/August (since 1954!), it was really the steady hand and sharp eye of its most formidable editors Julie Lasky and, before that, Chee Pearlman that made I.D. a force of good in design. Lasky left last February to join the website Change Observer and continue championing innovative design. The rest of us will just have to turn the page.

Page 379 of 430« First...102030...377378379380381...390400410...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License