Farm Economics

Other
Friday, January 22, 2010
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Students at PS 216 in Brooklyn will soon have a new class in their curriculum: Farming 101. (Courtesy WorkAC)

A couple of days ago the New York Times buried a bit of architecture news in their Dining & Wine section: WorkAC has designed facilities for the first New York affiliate of the Edible Schoolyard program. Initiated by the Chez Panisse foundation and begun 15 years ago at Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School in Berkeley, CA, the program offers students the opportunity to be involved in the planting, growing, and harvesting of seasonal produce. While much of the project will involve tearing up an asphalt yard to make way for planting beds, the heart will be a new kitchen classroom designed by WorkAC, which has dabbled before in edible architecture. The building’s butterfly-shaped roof will collect rainwater for irrigation, and a 1,600-square-foot moveable greenhouse will extend the growing season. The building will be solar powered and will also include a chicken coop, dishwashing facilities, and a toolshed. More images after the jump.

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P.S. 1 is SO-IL

East
Thursday, January 21, 2010
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Florian Idenburg and Jing Liu, in the studio with their daughter. (Courtesy SO-IL.org)

UPDATE: Get the full story, including renderings, on our main page.

Well into its second decade, P.S.1 and MoMA’s Young Architect’s Program looked just south of its Queens home for this year’s winner, selecting Brooklyn’s SO-IL Solid Objectives Idenburg Liu to design the now famous summertime pavilion in the P.S. 1 courtyard. They beat out two fellow Brooklynites, Freecell and Easton + Coombes, Cambridge’s William O’Brien, Jr., and a dark horse Danish contender BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group. Renderings will be released at a MoMA event tomorrow, but a press release describes their entry thusly: Read More

The Rain in SF is Mainly in the Drain

West
Thursday, January 21, 2010
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Islais Creek is San Francisco's equivalent of the L.A. River--it's currently hidden underground. Courtesy Rosey Jencks/San Francisco Public Utilities Commission

The winter rains in the Bay Area, as usual, seem to be too much of a good thing. There’s a fair number of flooded streets and general consternation about this stuff falling from the sky. But if we thought about it differently, it might seem more like manna from heaven. I did a little calculation this morning to see what was going down the drain. Read More

Turning Up Design

Midwest
Thursday, January 21, 2010
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(images courtesy of the Volume Gallery)

We have previously reported on Chicago’s burgeoning independent design scene, and now the Windy City is gaining a new venue to see the newest design thinking. The Volume Gallery will serve as a “platform for emerging American designers to engage with an international audience,” according to a statement form the organizers. Their first exhibition on designer Jonathan Nesci, called THE NEW, will be held at the Andrew Rafacz Gallery in the West Loop, and will feature limited editions, including tables, chairs, and pendant lamps. Nesci’s work has been widely published and has been show at Design Miami, ICFF, Design Art London, and the Salone del Mobile in Milan. Read More

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Messrs. Fixit

National
Wednesday, January 20, 2010
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All aboard. (Teamsugar.com)

With the loss in yesterday’s Massachusetts special election no doubt hanging heavily over the White House today, the Obama administration can at least take solace in the fact it’s done at least one thing right. Planetizen points us to a Brookings Institution report from Friday that gives the 44th president an A- grade for infrastructure from his first year, meaning there’s still room for improvement (launch an infrastructure bank) but things are generally pretty good (high speed rail, grid upgrades, job creation). Read More

Where Today Meets Tomorrow Night

East, East Coast
Wednesday, January 20, 2010
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(Click to enlarge)

What do Eero Saarinen and Susan Skarsgard have in common? They both worked for GM: he, the Technical Center in Warren, Michigan, his first great commission; she, graphic design for the Big Three car company for more than 15 years. They also share space at the Museum of the City of New York, where Skarsgard will be giving a talk tomorrow night at 6:30 about her sumptuous, custom-made book as part of the museum’s ongoing Saarinen show, Shaping the Future. Weighing 35 pounds, Where Today Meets Tomorrow was painstakingly produced by Skarsgard over a number of years at the Technical Center, which also happens to be her office. The one-of-a-kind book, through which Skarsgard will guide the museum’s guest on a virtual tour, includes rarely seen archival materials from GM and Saarinen. We got a few more shots after the jump to whet your appetite, but if that’s not enough, check out a book of the same name we just found online produced when the center first opened, with principal photography from none other than Ezra Stoller. Read More

Drawing Attention

East
Wednesday, January 20, 2010
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Jean Tschumi's Nestlé Headquarters (Courtesy Artinfo.com)

Just when we thought the season of giving was behind us, Bernard Tschumi has brought out one last gift for MoMA. The architect announced yesterday that he would donate 43 of his father’s architectural drawings to the museum, making it the only non-European institution with a collection of Jean Tschumi originals. Read More

Trumpets, Please!

East, East Coast
Tuesday, January 19, 2010
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Anne Guiney and AN gang at the bar on Inauguration Day.

Former AN editor, Anne Guiney, has been named executive director of The Institute for Urban Design, the organization dedicated to fomenting debate about urban planning and development policy. With longtime experience as a magazine editor including stints at Metropolis and Architecture magazines, Guiney was part of the original team of editors at The Architect’s Newspaper, making sure that urban planning received as much coverage as architecture and design. Read More

Targeting the Loop

Midwest
Tuesday, January 19, 2010
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(courtesy Joseph Freed and Associates)

Crain’s Chicago Business reports that big-box retailer Target is negotiating with the developers Joseph Freed and Associates for space at the venerable Carson Pirie Scott & Co. building, now named the Sullivan Center.  Formerly home of the department store Carson Pirie Scott, the building, designed by Louis Sullivan, has remained largely vacant following a recent substantial rehab effort.  The upper floors house the School of the Art Institute Chicago’s departments of  architecture, interior architecture, and designed objects and the architectural mega-firm Gensler.  The building anchors the slightly more downtrodden southern end of State Street within the Loop.  Read More

Spielberg Wades Into The Pit

West
Tuesday, January 19, 2010
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Steven Spielberg has captured some dicey events on film: World War II, Alien Invasions, and Dinosaurs gone wild. But none of that can prepare him for the mess that he’s about to cover: the World Trade Center. Spielberg is producing a documentary for the Science Channel called Rebuilding Ground Zero, a six-part series set to run next year. The show is the brainchild of architect Danny Forster, who hosts and produces the Science Channel’s Build It Bigger, and it will be directed by Jonathan Hock, who  shot Through the Fire, a documentary about Coney Island basketball star and NBA dud Sebastian Telfair. Each episode of Rebuilding will chronicle one aspect of the ultra-slow redevelopment, including the Freedom Tower, the memorials, the park, the museum, and the transportation hub. Perhaps Spielberg will conjure up some CGI magic to make the site look like more than a hole in the ground? We’ll have to wait and see.

Full Steam Ahead

East, East Coast
Monday, January 18, 2010
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A bronze mural, one of two designed by Beyer Blinder Belle, adorns the recently renovated lobby of 230 Park Avenue (Courtesy Monday Properties)

While the preservation experts at Beyer Blinder Belle are typically busy making old structures look new with new components that look old (like, say, the signage at a certain skyscraper), BBB’s designers also from time to time design from whole cloth. Or whole bronze, as is the case for a pair of murals created for a recent lobby renovation to 230Park Avenue, the former Helmsley Building that caps Grand Central. Last Monday, Monday Properties president Anthony Westreich, the building’s owner, dedicated the murals along with local pols Scott Stringer and Daniel Garodnick and Landmarks Preservation Commission chair Robert Tierney. Weighing more than a ton, the murals—which were drawn by Chris Ludlow and sculpted by Joan Benefiel under the direction of BBB—hark back to the building’s history as the former headquarters for the New York Central Railroad, depicting a train speeding by with the distinctive profile of 230 Park in the background. See more photos from the dedication and shop after the jump. Read More

Brazil 2, Chicago 0

Eavesdroplet
Friday, January 15, 2010
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Chicago suffered another crushing defeat to the hands of Brazil: first its Olympic bid loss to Rio and now best new restaurant design to Sao Paulo. Wallpaper* announced the winners in its Design Awards 2010 competition yesterday afternoon. The Chicago restaurant, Terzo Piano, nestled on top of the new Renzo Piano’s addition to the Art Institute, was nominated in the Best New Restaurant category along with contenders from Brazil, Argentina, South Korea, and Portugal. It ultimately lost to Sao Paulo’s Amazonian-inspired Kaa. Read More

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