Preservationists Fight To Save Modernist North Carolina Office Building

Small's modernist marvel. (Courtesy John Morris, goodnightraleigh.com)

Small’s modernist marvel. (Courtesy John Morris, goodnightraleigh.com)

A group of North Carolina preservationists is trying to protect a local piece of modernist history from the impending wrecking ball. The News & Observer reported that a group called North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) has started a campaign to save the former Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic building, which was designed by Raleigh architect G. Milton Small over 50 years ago.

“The building is really Raleigh’s finest example of international architecture,” said George Smart, the head of NCMH, who noted that Small studied under Mies van der Rohe at IIT.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Critical Inversion of the Prosthetic Public Armature

East, Eavesdroplet
Wednesday, April 30, 2014
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diller-geffen

Liz Diller / David Geffen.

Speaking of the architecture/celebrity complex, a source told Eavesdrop that Liz Diller is designing an Upper East Side apartment for entertainment mogul David Geffen. The once radical architect has gotten awfully cozy with the establishment. We guess all that time in Los Angeles designing The Broad is paying off.

Total Reset: Institute for Public Architecture Symposium Tackles Affordable Housing in New York City

East, Review
Wednesday, April 30, 2014
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The "Total Reset" symposium took place at Columbia's Studio-X.

The “Total Reset” symposium took place at Columbia’s Studio-X.

The history of affordable housing in the United States has always centered on efforts—research, architectural prototypes, and creative financing—undertaken in New York City. From early philanthropic models like the late 19th century Cobble Hill Tower Homes, the 1911 Vanderbilt-sponsored Cherokee Model Apartments, and the 1930s Amalgamated Dwellings on the Lower East Side, virtually all early advancement in housing reform in this country began in New York City.

Continue reading after the jump.

Plans For 200-Acre Neighborhood in Austin Meet With Various Community Reactions

Southwest
Wednesday, April 30, 2014
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Attendees walk through a map of the proposal (Courtesy Colony Park Sustainable Community Initiative)

Meeting attendees walk through a map of the proposal (Courtesy City of Austin)

The evening of April 14th was a big one for the East Austin community, when developers met with residents to unveil the master plan for the 208-acre lot of land known as Colony Park. Plans for the development were rolled out onto a community center floor as a giant map that enabled attendees to walk, step-by-step, through the five-year-plus initiative. The project hopes to bring commerce, parks, new residences, into a sustainable community.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> ‘CHGO DSGN’ probes the past and present of Chicago Design

Art, Design, Midwest, On View
Wednesday, April 30, 2014
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(CHGO DSGN)

(CHGO DSGN)

It looks like design history is in the air here in Chicago. The Chicago Design Museum is in the middle of a Kickstarter campaign to launch an exhibition looking back at 100 years of graphic arts. Chicagoisms just opened at The Art Institute—a meditation on Chicago’s architectural history and mythology that builds off a previous exhibition of unbuilt work reviewed here.

Now another exhibit glances at Chicago’s design history to better assess its present and future.

Continue reading after the jump.

Did Boston’s Millennium Tower Break a “Record” With Its 36-Hour Concrete Pour?

Boston's Millennium Tower. (Courtesy Handel Architects)

Boston’s Millennium Tower. (Courtesy Handel Architects)

After a continuous 36-hour concrete pour last weekend, Boston’s Millennium Tower is ready to rise above the city skyline. The day-and-a-half-long pour of 6,000 cubic yards for the Handel Architects–designed project is being called a “record concrete pour” by local press—and it probably is, at least in terms of hours spent pouring. But if you crunch the numbers, as AN did, the pour in Beantown reveals that the tower’s concrete took its sweet, sweet time to flow. We’ll explain.

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Review> Engineering and Design Common Themes in Films at SXSW 2014

Art, National, Review
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Still from DamNation. (Courtesy DamNation)

Still from DamNation. (Courtesy DamNation)

At this year’s SXSW Festival, engineering took center stage in the documentary DamNation (directors Travis Rummel & Ben Knight), which won the Documentary Spotlight Audience Award. It begins with America’s rash of dam-building under FDR when these mammoth structures were considered man-made wonders. Hoover and Grand Coulee are the large-scale examples, but there were about 80,000 smaller dams built across the country.

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New York Affordable Housing Experts Weigh In on De Blasio’s Pending Housing Plan

Development, East
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Aerial view of New York City. (Flickr /  Katy Silberger)

Aerial view of New York City. (Flickr / Katy Silberger)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has been promising to “preserve or construct” nearly 200,000 units of affordable housing since his days as the most unlikely of mayoral contenders. Since stepping into City Hall, the mayor has repeated that pledge nearly every chance he gets. But while the affordable housing plan is one of his central policy issues, it’s still not clear how the city can hit the mayor’s magic number. That should change this week when de Blasio’s housing team releases their detailed plan of action. Before that plan is released, however, AN asked some of the city’s leading architects, advocates, and planners what they hope to see in the team’s path forward.

Continue reading after the jump.

Is Los Angeles’ Convention Center Expansion Moving Ahead?

Architecture, Development, West
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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It appears that Populous's plan for the Convention Center expansion is dead. (Populous)

It appears that Populous’ plan for the Convention Center expansion is dead. (Courtesy Populous)

According to LA Downtown News, while AEG’s proposed downtown football stadium, Farmers Field, remains on hold, the city’s Bureau of Engineering will most likely be holding a three-team design competition to rebuild part of its sister project: the LA Convention Center, down the street.

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You Like Us! You Really Like Us! AN’s Facebook Community Surpasses 500,000 Followers

International, Media
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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facebook

Earlier this afternoon, The Architect’s Newspaper gained our 500,000th Facebook friend, a major milestone in our growth. For an independently owned publication that started as a local print tabloid, the expansion of our readership in print, online, and through social media in the United States and around the world has been thrilling to watch. We’re so grateful for your support. But more importantly, we are happy to be a part of increasing the public’s awareness of architecture, design, planning, urbanism, and landscape architecture. That’s what keeps us working so hard every day. For those of you who can’t get enough AN, consider following and sharing us on social media: Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter. Thanks again for your interest and support!

Obit> Fred Schwartz, 1951–2014

East, Obit
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Fred Schwartz looks toward the New Jersey 9/11 memorial, Empty Sky, from the documentary, The Art of Memories. (Courtesy The Art of Memories)

Fred Schwartz looks toward the New Jersey 9/11 memorial, Empty Sky, from the documentary, The Art of Memories. (Courtesy The Art of Memories)

We heard this morning that Fred Schwartz—one of the most independent, passionate, and even fearless voices in the New York architecture world—passed away last night. Frederic Schwartz Architects was well known for its waterfront park planning and various 9/11 memorials (Fred died at 9:11p.m. last night).

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Page Architects Transforming Basement Tunnels at Houston’s Niels Esperson Building

News, Preservation, Southwest
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Renderings of the lobby after the basement's reconstruction (Photo Courtesty of pagethink.com)

Renderings of the lobby after the basement’s reconstruction. (Courtesy Page)

The historic Niels Esperson Building has lit up the Houston skyline since 1927, but far below the tower’s neo-Classical cupola, a basement space connecting to a series of tunnels meandering underneath the city has remained out of the spotlight. Now, the building’s basement gets to play catch up in the fame game with a $2.5 million renovation spearheaded by architectural firm Page.

Continue reading after the jump.

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