Architecture Firm Offers One Luxury Buyer a Custom Backyard Stadium

Architecture, National
Monday, December 16, 2013
.
(Courtesy Populous)

Populous designs a scaled multisport field for your backyard. (Courtesy Populous)

Searching for the perfect holiday gift? If AN’s 2013 Holiday Gift Guide choices are not exquisite enough for your recipient’s taste, sport architecture firm Populous has just the right $30 million option.

The Kansas City-based company, whose commissions include Yankee Stadium in New York City and London’s Olympic Stadium, will give one big spender their own custom backyard stadium this holiday season. The offer was created for Robb Report’s Ultimate Gift List this year, a list of luxury presents for the world’s wealthiest, said Ballpark Digest. After at least 12 months of design and construction, the personal field will be equipped with the electronic displays and the technology to host and play nearly any sport.

Continue reading after the jump.

Clog Journal Tackles the Stories Traditional Media Overlooks

Architecture, Media
Monday, December 16, 2013
.
(Courtesy Clog)

(Courtesy Clog)

The journal Clog wants to slow things down. It believes that digital media has reduced the “lifespan of any single design or topic” to a nano second and that the deluge of content required to feed online platforms means that “excellent projects receive the same fleeting attention as mediocre ones.” In order to counter these trends, Clog focuses on its print journal with themed issues like Brutalism, The National Mall, Rendering, and next spring, Prisons (submissions due December 31, 2013).

Continue reading after the jump.

Filed Under: ,

Review> The New Normal: Penn Symposium Explores Generative Digital Design

Review
Monday, December 16, 2013
.
Interior rendering of Neil M. Denari Architects' competition-winning design for the Keelung Harbor Service Building, Taiwan. (Courtesy NMDA)

Interior rendering of Neil M. Denari Architects’ competition-winning design for the Keelung Harbor Service Building, Taiwan. (Courtesy NMDA)

[Editor's Note: The following review was authored by Gideon Fink Shapiro and Phillip M. Crosby.]

A generation’s worth of experimentation with generative digital design techniques has seemingly created a “new normal” for architecture. But what exactly are the parameters of this “normal” condition? On November 14th and 15th Winka Dubbeldam, principal of Archi-Tectonics and the new Chair of the Department of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, called together some of contemporary architecture’s most prominent proponents of generative digital design techniques for a symposium, The New Normal, examining how these techniques have transformed the field over the past twenty years. According to Ms. Dubbeldam and her colleagues in Penn’s post-professional program who organized the symposium, digital tools have “fundamentally altered the way in which we conceptualize, design, and fabricate architecture.” Participants were asked not only to reflect upon the recent past, but also to speculate on future possibilities.

Continue reading after the jump.

Changes Ahead for North Brooklyn: Two Massive Projects Move Forward

Architecture, Development, East
Monday, December 16, 2013
.
SHoP-designed proposal for Domino Sugar Refinery (COURTESY SHOP ARCHITECTS AND JAMES CORNER FIELD OPERATIONS)

SHoP-designed proposal for Domino Sugar Refinery (COURTESY SHOP ARCHITECTS AND JAMES CORNER FIELD OPERATIONS)

Last week was a big week for development in the already condo-saturated area of north Brooklyn. Brownstoner reported that City Council gave the massive Greenpoint Landing proposal the green light to construct 10 towers along the East River waterfront. While the project already had the approval to build as of right, the developers made a few concessions including an agreement to build a public school, offer free shuttle service to transit nodes from the complex, bump up the number of affordable housing units, and allocate money towards Newton Barge Park.

In Williamsburg, the SHoP-designed Domino Sugar Refinery proposal (pictured) received Community Board One’s approval. Two Trees also had as of right to build its string of towers, but the developer is now seeking to increase the height of the buildings and add more green space. Board members requested a few tweaks to affordable housing options and retail.

Chicago’s Divvy bikeshare wants your help placing new stations

A screenshot of Divvy stations, in blue, and suggestions in green. (Divvy)

A screenshot of Divvy stations, in blue, and suggestions in green. (Divvy)

Chicago’s Divvy bikesharing program wants your help placing new bicycle rental stations throughout the city. The Divvy Siting Team will consider your suggestions at suggest.divvybikes.com—they’ve already mapped many public suggestions alongside the 300 existing stations.

Last month the program announced its intent to become North America’s largest bikesharing system. Divvy will add 175 stations by the end of 2014 and, pending state and federal funding, bring another 75 online after that, raising the total to 550 stations.

As it expands, Divvy could address previous criticisms about equal access. Though it started by focusing on the Loop and other high-density downtown areas, the program has expanded into many neighborhoods. Still, many are unserved—Uptown is the northern terminus, while much of the West, Southwest, and South Sides have no stations.

On View> The Indianapolis Museum of Art Presents “Impressed: Modern Japanese Prints”

Art, Midwest, On View
Friday, December 13, 2013
.
(Courtesy Indianapolis Museum of Art)

(Courtesy Indianapolis Museum of Art)

 

Impressed: Modern Japanese Prints
Indianapolis Museum of Art
4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, IN
Through January 26, 2014

In traditional Japanese woodblock printing, a team of four artists worked to create a single piece. In this collaboration, the publisher directed the designer, the engraver, and the printer to apply their respective artisan skills for the creation of a final artwork. During the early 20th century, however, a new printmaking method arose in Japan, transforming the group project into an independent endeavor. The Sosaku hanga, “creative prints,” school of printmakers became the first solo artists in Japanese woodblock printing, designing and executing every aspect of their artworks by their own hand.

Currently on exhibit at the Indianapolis Museum of Art is a collection of these masterpieces, including some the best known Sosaku hanga printmakers from the last century. Running through January 26, Impressed: Modern Japanese Prints explores the effects of blossoming individualism on woodblock prints. Distinguished by intricate detailing and the look of a highly texturized surface, the exhibition’s display of print works by Tajima Hiroyuki, Iwami Reika, Saito Kiyoshi, and Maki Haku shows that artists of this movement considered the woodblock print an art form, not a commercial venture.

Filed Under: 

Thomas Balsley Reaches Destination with Landscape Forms

Fabrikator
Friday, December 13, 2013
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator

The Transit Bench was fabricated in Landscape Forms custom project division, Studio 431. (Michael Koontz/Thomas Balsley Associates)

The Transit Bench was fabricated in Landscape Forms custom project division, Studio 431. (Michael Koontz/Thomas Balsley Associates)

Aerodynamics of transit inform the design for new public seating in busy pedestrian areas like train platforms.

Landscape architect Thomas Balsley has been shaping public spaces in urban settings for more than 35 years, from the Bronx to Dallas to Portland. Even at large scales his work underscores attention to detail, all the way down to the furniture that adorns his sites. As a resident of New York since the 1970s, Balsley is all too aware of the way public benches and seating function in densely populated cities. For Transit Bench—fabricated by Landscape Forms custom project team at Studio 431—he designed a seating option for busy pedestrian areas, like train platforms and street-side parklets, where movement engulfs stationary seating.

“I started thinking of the aerodynamic aspects of transit and airline design, where the skin of the plane is an important structural component,” Balsley told AN. “I had the idea that this folded piece of skin could be the structure.” The bench, which rests on two sled base legs, is one solid form, made from a single sheet of stainless steel with laser cut perforations that suggest motion.

Read More

Unsitely: Submit Case Studies for Improving Construction Site Aesthetics

Urbanism
Thursday, December 12, 2013
.

01-unsitely

Architects are probably the only people who like to see a construction site. We love to see building cranes, steel workers, and scaffolding—if only because it means architects are working and paying the rent. But for most urban dwellers these work places are “unsitely” disruptions to daily life and noisy irritations.

Now Montreal’s Design Bureau, in collaboration with the city’s downtown Ville-Marie borough and the Saint-Étienne Cité du Design (France), are launching an effort to correct this situation and asking architects for help. They will host a colloquium called “Unsitely! Leveraging Design to Improve Urban Construction Sites” on October 8-9, 2014. They are asking architects to submit proposals on how design can improve individual and collective experience, and the overall communication strategy of major worksites, or at least to contribute to reducing their negative impact on daily life.

Architects (and others) should submit cases studies that address these issues by Tuesday, December 17, 2013. For additional information, contact colloquium executive producer, Laetitia Wolff.

Architect Elena Manferdini Completes the Colorful, Laser-Cut “Nembi” Installation in South Los Angeles

Architecture, West
Thursday, December 12, 2013
.
(Atelier Manferdini)

(Atelier Manferdini)

Until recently, talented Los Angeles–based architect Elena Manferdini had practiced all over the world, but barely  in her own city. That has definitely changed. Earlier this year she worked on two shops in Venice, and her latest project is an art installation at the entry way of the Hubert H. Humphrey Comprehensive Health Center in South Los Angeles. The colorful project is part of the LA County Art Commission’s Civic Art project, a one percent program for county facilities.

Read more after the jump.

MAS NYC Seeks Nominations for 2013 Brendan Gill Prize.  MAS NYC Seeks Nominations for 2013 Brendan Gill Prize The Municipal Art Society (MAS) is accepting nominations for the 2013 Brendan Gill Prize. Each year the MAS presents the honor, which carries a cash prize, to a creator of a work of art from the past deemed to embody the spirit and energy of New York City. Former MAS chairman Gill spent more than 60 years as a critic of architecture and theater for the New Yorker and the prize was established in his honor in 1987. Past winners within the field of architecture include Louis Kahn and Michael Van Valkenburgh (pictured).  MAS will be accepting nominations until January 6, 2014. (Photo: Courtesy MAS)

 

RIBA Halts Lubetkin Prize Honoring International Projects.  RIBA Halts Lubetkin Prize Honoring International Projects Building Design Online reports that 2013 will be the last year of the Lubetkin Prize, an honor the Royal Institute of British Architects has awarded annually since 2006 to the best new building outside of the European Union.  Whereas RIBA members and fellows were the only candidates eligible for the honor, in 2015 the organization plans to launch a new International Prize open to all architects. In September, London firm Wilkinson Eyre received what now becomes the last Lubetkin Prize for their Gardens by the Bay project in Singapore (pictured). (Photo:  Nimrod Bar / Flickr)

 

Payette Designs a Curvy Research Building, Parks for Boston’s Northeastern University

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter, Unveiled
Thursday, December 12, 2013
.
Northeastern University's new Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building (Courtesy of Payette and Northeastern)

Northeastern University’s new Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building. (Courtesy Payette and Northeastern)

Boston is well known for both its thriving biotech industry and for its high concentration of universities, and now the city’s two largest economic sectors are overlapping with several academic institutions shrewdly expanding their science departments. Northeastern University is one of several schools to hop on this bandwagon. The school just announced that it will build a 180,000-square-foot academic facility, called the Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building (ISEB). Boston-based firm Payette won the commission to design the six-story building along with adjoining green spaces after participating in a six week design competition.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 35 of 405« First...102030...3334353637...405060...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License