Daily Clicks: Top Ten, Exhibitionist, Streetcars, Saving Trees

Daily Clicks
Friday, December 10, 2010
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Stephan Sagmeister's new web site. (Courtesy Sagmeister.com)

Stephan Sagmeister's new web site. (Courtesy Sagmeister.com)

We’re starting up a new regular feature here on the AN Blog we’re tentatively calling Daily Clicks. For your perusal, a quick selection of architecture and design stories from around the web.

The year’s best. The Chicago Tribune‘s Blair Kamin looks beyond the doom and gloom that was 2010 to find the top ten architectural bright spots. Among his picks? The opening of the Burj Khalifa and a pollution-eating park in Chicago, and [ City Scapes ]

Cincy Streetcar. Cincinnati is one step closer to a new streetcar system, after the Ohio Department of Transportation unanimously recommended $35 million for construction of the system’s first phase, which is expected to open in 2013. [ Urban Cincy ]

Don’t hit print! A new file format, the WWF (after the World Wildlife Fund, of course), aims at saving a few trees as we send around PDFs through e.mail. If you’d like to prohibit your PDFs from being printed, there’s a free software download. [ Core 77 ]

Office Exhibitionism. Artist Stephan Sagmeister has a new web site. Now, you can sit and stare at a live feed from a web cam inside his New York studio to make sure everyone’s working. On this late Friday afternoon, orange balloons were strewn across the floor, leaving us regretting we’d missed the party.  [ Creative Review ]

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    See A Theater In The Making At Hard Hat Sunday

    West
    Friday, December 10, 2010
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    A Noise Within's construction site

    Classical repertory theater A Noise Within (ANW) will find itself occupying some interesting digs next fall, moving from its longtime leased space in Glendale to a new 33,000-square foot facility built into the former Stuart Pharmaceutical building—a historic, mid-century modern complex designed by Edward Durell Stone. The design is being carried out by KKE and John Berry Architects. But before ANW even packs its bags for its new home, the company is giving culture vultures free peeks of the facility in construction every second Sunday of the month, including this Sunday. “It’s one thing to see something already built, but it’s another to see everything that goes into it,” said artistic director Julia Rodriguez-Elliott, who is on hand for each tour, along with co-artistic director Geoff Elliott and the occasional board member or project superintendent. Contrary to its name—Hard Hat Sundays—guests don’t wear the head gear, but instead gather safely on a viewing deck and peer down at the site in progress. If you’ve ever wanted to know more about rebar than what you’re supposed to, or simply want to enjoy the sunset with other culture lovers, this could be your ticket.

    So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright

    Other
    Friday, December 10, 2010
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    Frank Lloyd Wright (Courtesy Library of Congress)

    Frank Lloyd Wright (Courtesy Library of Congress)

    Not many architects can boast being the subject of a pop song, but, then again, Frank Lloyd Wright was always something special. Back in 1969, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel eulogized the architect in the eponymous “So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright,” appearing on their Bridge Over Troubled Water album. Garfunkel took an interest in Wright while studying architecture at Columbia and later challenged Simon to write the song while living in California.

    While some argue that the song is really a cryptic breakup poem between the two singers on the verge of splitting, I’m sticking with architecture going mainstream. As the song says, “Architects may come and/Architects may go and/Never change your point of view./ When I run dry/I stop awhile and think of you.”

    Hear the song after the jump.

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    Pictorial: Le Monolithe by MVRDV

    International
    Friday, December 10, 2010
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    Le Monolithe in Lyon, France (Courtesy MVRDV)

    Le Monolithe in Lyon, France (Courtesy MVRDV)

    MVRDV just completed “Le Monolithe,” a mixed-use project in Lyon, France featuring social housing, apartments, disabled residences, offices, and retail organized along a central exterior axis of courtyards. The 350,000 square foot structure overlooks the confluence of the Rhône and Saône rivers and represents a collaboration of several architects and landscape architects.

    Take a look at the project after the jump.

    Emeryville Art Center Short List On Display

    West
    Thursday, December 9, 2010
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    Edmonds+ Lee's plan removes the site's existing building altogether

    The SF Chronicle’s John King today shares the shortlist for the new Emeryville Center For the Arts. The six contestants are some of the city’s best young firms. In fact organizer David Meckel—stressing this push for emerging talent— initially said that the winner should not be a fellow of the AIA. The finalists include:  Aidlin Darling, Edmonds + Lee, Jensen Architects, Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects, Schwartz and Architecture, and Envelope A+D. Their plans are currently on display at Emeryville City Hall, next to which the arts center will eventually sit . All except Edmonds+Lee include the site’s existing 1940′s brick building. Aidlin Darling includes a sloped green roof for film watching; Ogrydziak Prillinger layers spaces in and out of the structure; and Jensen architects opens it up with large, movable glass walls. The winner will be announced next week, so stay tuned.

    Architects with Altitude

    Other
    Thursday, December 9, 2010
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    Towering figures in the field of architecture (BK / Architect's Newspaper)

    Towering figures in the field of architecture. Click to enlarge. (BK / Architect's Newspaper)

    Witold Rybczynski, smart writer, stupid article.

    Last Thursday, Slate‘s respected architecture critic weighed in with the dubious notion that the shorter in height, the greater the architect. This silly notion has gone viral on the web, and we felt it was our job to rebut it with some tall figures. Here they are.

    New Routes for High Speed Rail Funds

    Midwest
    Thursday, December 9, 2010
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    It’s hard to imagine turning down $1.2 billion. That is, unless you’re the governors-elect of Wisconsin and Ohio. The New York Times reported today that those two states officially withdrew claim to their shares of federal stimulus money awarded for construction of new rail corridors, citing concerns over subsidies needed to run the trains. Instead the money will be redirected to 13 other states. Ironically, both Wisconsin and Ohio had lobbied aggressively for big hunks of the $8 billion set aside for high-speed rail development in Obama’s stimulus package. Things changed when Republicans won both governorships, partly on the platform of denying the stimulus awards. Read More

    Rolling on the High Line

    East, Other
    Wednesday, December 8, 2010
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    View of the High Line lawn from HL23. (Image: Diana Darling)

     

    We were scouting cool party spaces recently and caught this view from the 9th floor of Neil Denari’s HL23 on the High Line. Lower floors of the 14-story condo, now nearing completion, are going to feel pretty vulnerable to nose-pressers strolling up the rail-bed park who will be just feet away from their living room glass walls. But on the upper floors, views of the length of High Line will unfurl as alluringly as the Yellow Brick Road. Right now, it’s possible to make out the stretch of emerald lawn section at 23rd Street, waiting for its sunbathers.

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    Deck the Tiny Walls

    Midwest
    Wednesday, December 8, 2010
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    English drawing room from the Victorian period, 1840-1870. (All photos courtesy Art Institute of Chicago).

    Many museums have of period rooms in their holdings, but the Art Institute of Chicago also has an impressive collection of 68 miniature period spaces. Rather than treat these dollhouse-sized objects as sacred or static, the museum has decorated six of them for the holidays with historically and culturally appropriate trimmings. The English Victorian drawing room is the only one that includes a Christmas tree. Take a look at some of the rooms and details from Tudor to Modern spaces.
    Seriously cute stuff inside.

    The Other Side of Ellis Island

    East
    Wednesday, December 8, 2010
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    photo by Alyssa Nordhauser

    Most visitors to Ellis Island only get to see the Ellis Island Immigration Museum. I was fortunate enough to go on a hard hat tour of the island’s south side, which is not open to the public, and explore newly stabilized structures including the new (‘new’ as of 1934) ferry building and part of the old South Side Hospital Complex.

    Read More

    Hangar Selected for Intrepid

    East
    Tuesday, December 7, 2010
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    The Intrepid's winning hangar design by students from New York Institute of Technology.

    December 7, 2010, a day that will live in memory, as opposed to infamy, for winners from New York Institute of Technology’s (NYIT) Student Design Competition held at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Students were charged with creating a sustainable airplane hangar on the deck of the floating museum for under $1 million. Chosen among the six finalists, Team Alphabet Soup walked away with the $3,000 prize by incorporating renewable energy into the design and developing a educational environment for museum visitors.

    Read more after the jump.

    New Eagle Rock Arts Hub Opening In Style

    West
    Monday, December 6, 2010
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    Workers put the finishing touches on Live Arts LA

    This Saturday night LA’s newest arts center will be opening its doors for a sneak peek: Live Arts LA, a 5,000 square foot space for theater, dance, and the visual arts is built into a former warehouse in Eagle Rock/Glassell Park (our favorite up-and coming hipster neighborhoods). The cavernous open span building was renovated entirely out of repurposed materials by a team led by Hollywood set builder Daryl Lee. Saturday’s event will be a fundraiser for performance troupe Whiskey Carousel, a sassy cast of characters that performs a combination of vaudeville, cabaret, and burlesque. The night will also have performances by other dance groups as well as live music and art installations; including a piece by LA architects Layer, called Squid Capsule, a collection of transparent vinyl membranes hanging from steel cables that you may have seen installed at the Silver Lake gallery Materials & Applications. Live Arts LA will officially open later this month, offering everything from Afro-Caribbean dance classes to rehearsal rooms. Buy tickets to the event here, and get a preview below. Read More

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