San Diego Crossing Gets Green Lighting Scheme

West
Thursday, October 21, 2010
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The wind-powered project is said to be the greenest large-scale lighting design in the nation. (Courtesy FoRM/S+M/Buro Happold)

California State Route 75 is getting a whole lot snazzier. The 2.5-mile-long San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge is set to undergo the “largest interactive green energy lighting project in North America.” An international team led by London-based artist Peter Fink (FoRM Associates) and lighting designer Mark Major (Speirs + Major) plus the LA-based office of engineering consultant Buro Happold have won a worldwide contest to illuminate the iconic, swooping girder bridge, opened in 1969. Read More

Bunshaft Goes Big-Box While Bertoia Goes Missing?

East
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
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Forever (Landmarked) 21? (Neoscape)

The rumors about Gordon Bunshaft’s landmarked Manufacturer’s Hanover Trust Bank building being transformed into a big-box retail store have been flying around for a while now. In March, Vornado Realty Trust reportedly entered talks to buy the five-story building at 510 Fifth Avenue. Now, we’ve turned up a rendering by 3-D illustration firm Neoscape showing the building as the type of landmark only your high school daughter could love: a Forever 21.

But wait, it gets worse. Until this month the building has been occupied by Chase Bank, and while the changes made to the building for security reasons were lamentable, at least we could rest easy knowing that its site-specific Harry Bertoia sculpture—a 70-foot screen composed of 800 bronze plates—was safe. But not anymore. An AN tipster clued us in today: “Half of it is laying on the otherwise vacant 2nd floor. So far, all I’ve got from Chase is an assurance ‘it’s not going in the dumpster.’”

We confirmed the awful truth:

Read More

Starchitecture: The Next Generation

East
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
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Between Frank Lloyd Wright’s private homes, Louis Sullivan’s original skyscraper, and Henry Hobson Richardson’s asylum, Buffalo, New York has more famous and historically important architecture than most cities in the country.  Now Buffalo is working hard to churn out its own starchitects—starting in high school.  The new Architecture and Design Academy at the International Preparatory School at Grover celebrated its grand opening this week on Buffalo’s west side. Read More

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Army of Nurturers: Creating Elder-Friendly Cities

West
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
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Tree city, nuclear-free-zone city, why not "elder-friendly city"? Courtesy Sarah Kuehl of Peter Walker & Partners.

A couple of weeks ago, AIA San Francisco wound up its annual “Architecture and the City” festival with a nice jolt of inspiration. In an event at SPUR, organized in conjunction with GOOD Magazine, designers presented solutions to real-world problems. All of the conundrums were interesting and meaty: The California Public Utilities Commission, for example, wants more people to install solar hot water (Civil Twilight’s proposed marketing campaign included bright-yellow outdoor showers for surfers), and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority wants to get more people to take public transportation in bus-phobic Silicon Valley (Brute Labs suggested a new service based on the corporate shuttle model).  But the most poignant of all the problems was posed by retirement-home developer AgeSong: “To create a forgetfulness-friendly city and environment where many seniors in the early and more moderate stages of forgetfulness can live safely and happily.” Read More

Breaking Bricks at Moynihan Station

East
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
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Moynihan Station Rendering (Courtesy Moynihan Station Development Corporation)

Moynihan Station Rendering (Courtesy Moynihan Station Development Corporation)

Moynihan Station might not be welcoming its first passengers for years to come, but a heavy-hitting group of officials gathered at the James A. Farley Post Office to sledge-hammer a cinder block wall and declare Phase I ground officially broken.

Read more (with renderings!) after the jump.

Memphis Exhibition Honors Paul Revere Williams, Architect to the Stars

Midwest, West
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
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Marina del Rey Junior High School (David Horan)

Marina del Rey Junior High School (David Horan)

Love Lucy? Lucille Ball, that is. Then you’ll love her architect, too.  Opening on October 22, the Art Museum of the University of Memphis is hosting the first museum exhibition of African-American architect Paul Revere Williams whose work spans the 1920s through the 1960s.

More after the jump.

Behind the scenes at Canstruction LA

West
Tuesday, October 19, 2010
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Gensler and Arup's camera-inspired "Can-on Picture a World Without Hunger." (Tom Bonner)

Gensler and Arup's camera-inspired "Can-on Picture a World Without Hunger." (Tom Bonner)

AN recently took a sneak peak at late night preparations for the fifth annual Canstruction LA, a charitable design competition—whose pieces are currently on display in the lobby of 5900 Wilshire Boulevard— that taps teams of architects, designers, builders and engineers to create large-scale sculptures using canned goods (and even a few water bottles) that will eventually be donated to the Los Angeles Regional Foodbank. What we found was a furor of activity, many boxes of pizza, and a bit of competitive banter among teams. Read More

Under the High Line, Pop-Up Cave-itecture

East
Tuesday, October 19, 2010
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Richard Chai + Snarkitecture's ice-cave under the High Line. (Photo: David Smith)

Lurking under the High Line has been a bit more fun since Building Fashion began its series of architecture-and-fashion installations in September, erecting a new collaboration every two weeks as a means of reusing the former onsite Sales Tin of Neil Denari’s HL23 condos. On Thursday, Brooklyn firm Snarkitecture and fashion designer Richard Chai will unveil the fourth project in the series, a cave carved by hand from architectural foam. Designed to give shoppers the feel of a glacial cavern, the pop-up shop will feature men’s and women’s fashions displayed on shelves, niches, and hang bars embedded in the foam. Read More

Calatrava's Arch Towers Over Dallas

Other
Tuesday, October 19, 2010
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Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas under construction.

Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas under construction (Diana Darling)

Construction continues at Santiago Calatrava‘s bold Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in Dallas after it’s signature arch was topped off in June.  The cable-stayed bridge is one of three planned as part of the Trinity River Corridor Project, which aims to redevelop the Trinity River and its floodplains, improving traffic flow, increasing parkland, and providing flood protection for the region.

More after the jump.

Nouvel Sanguine About Midtown Guillotine

East
Tuesday, October 19, 2010
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Jean Nouvel (CBS News)

Jean Nouvel optimistic despite MoMA Tower’s shortened stature (CBS News)

Jean Nouvel feels like his MoMA Tower has been put under the guillotine.  The starchitect behind the lopped-off Midtown Manhattan proposal told CBS News this weekend that “It’s very French to cut the head, eh?”  His 75-story tower would have rivaled the Empire State Building for supremacy over the New York skyline, standing 1,250 feet tall, but met significant opposition from neighbors worried the tower would drown their street in shadow.

City Planning Commission officials voted earlier this year to allow a shortened version of the tower – chopping off 200 feet of the Pritzker Prize winner’s design.  Nouvel’s vision has been sent back to the drawing boards, but he says it’s “not in his character” to feel discouraged.  Be sure to check out AN‘s cameo appearance at the end of the interview.

Watch the interview after the jump.

A&D Film Festival Reeled Them In

Other
Tuesday, October 19, 2010
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Ant Farm in Action (Courtesy Kyle Bergman)

In spite of the glorious weather, the inaugural Architecture and Design Film Festival was a smash hit with dozens of the 40+ films shown over last weekend sold out in advance, and the notables on five accompanying panels actually sticking around for the films and conversation that ran at the Tribeca Cinemas last weekend, among them Cooper Hewitt’s Bill Moggeridge, the Times’ Pilar Vilades, and AIA’s Rick Bell.

Read more after the jump.

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Inside the Spire's Demise

Midwest
Monday, October 18, 2010
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(courtesy Business Week)

The Chicago skyline is one of the most impressive in the country. Those who dreamed of a twisting new tower at its pinnacle, however, will have to turn to new skyscraping schemes. The Anglo Irish Bank is seizing control of the stalled Chicago Spire’s site from Shelbourne Development. This detailed feature on the rise and fall of Santiago Calatrava’s unbuilt tower in the Irish Independent calls the project’s developer, Garrett Kelleher, emblematic of the jet-setting “Irish Tiger.” In today’s real estate environment, that label sounds more like slur than a compliment.

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