Slideshow: Zonnestraal Sanatorium Saved From Ruin

International
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
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Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum after restoration (Courtesy WMF)

Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum after restoration (Courtesy WMF)

Abandoned and nearly lost, the Zonnestraal Sanatorium in Hilversum, Netherlands has been meticulously restored to its former glory by Bierman Henket architecten and Wessel de Jonge architecten.  In honor of their efforts, the two firms were awarded the 2010 World Monuments Fund / Knoll Modernism Prize.  Alan Brake penned an article for the print edition of The Architect’s Newspaper:

Designed in 1926–1928 by Johannes Duiker and Bernard Bijvoet and completed in 1931, the sanatorium is considered a seminal work of early modernism. Though it was well known when it was built, the structure was eventually abandoned, and since then nearly subsumed by the surrounding landscape. Portions of the three-building complex were almost completely lost, so many parts of the sanatorium had to be meticulously reconstructed, including formerly mass-produced elements that had to be recreated by hand.

Read the entire article from The Architect’s Newspaper.

A gallery of before and after conditions after the jump.

Karl Lagerfeld Picks Chilewich for Chanel Show

International
Monday, November 1, 2010
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Chanel meets Chilewich (Chilewich)

Vinyl fabric manufacturer Chilewich has gone from table runners to the runway. Karl Lagerfeld, creative director for Chanel, chose the company’s stencil-like Cubic lace design for the Spring/Summer 2011 ready-to-wear show at Paris Fashion Week last month. The design, currently part of Chilewich’s tabletop collection, was reproduced into a sheer cocktail dress with feather trim and was one of the last numbers to float down the Chanel runway. (A note on the architecture: The Grand Palais was dramatically transformed into a seemingly post-apocalyptic formal garden with charred black hedges and white gravel.)

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China Talks

Other
Friday, October 29, 2010
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From left, the panelists Ilana Judah, Wang Degang, Mesh Chen Dongliang, moderator Julie Iovine, Trespa's Todd Kimmel

It was a panel I couldn’t refuse: To moderate a talk with two architects from China about sustainability.  Not that it’s a topic with which I am very familiar, but I would guess that even architects working there find much about the Chinese approach to environmental issues a mystery. I do know that the country has a $375 billion dollar construction industry devouring resources and that, at least ten years ago, a new coal-fired plant was being built every ten days. But things are changing fast and the chance to talk to Wang Degang who has his own 20-person firm in Nanjing and with Mesh Chen Dongliang who has been working for the past six years at Arquitectonica’s Shanghai office about their impressions was quite an opportunity.

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Perkins Eastman Getting Together with EE&K

East
Friday, October 29, 2010
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Perkins Eastman joins with Ehrenkrantz, Eckstut, & Kuhn

Merger-meld: Perkins Eastman + Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn

Perkins Eastman confirmed today that the global practice is merging with Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn and the firms will be consolidating their offices in New York, Washington, D.C., and China.  When the merger is complete, the new firm – yet to be named – will have a total of nearly 600 employees, 500 from Perkins Eastman and 85 from EE&K.  Steven Yates with Perkins Eastman says no major layoffs have taken place in the past nine months and the company is not planning any layoffs as part of the merger.

Perkins Eastman is the designer behind Times Square’s glowing red stairs and a mega-project in Queens while EE&K has been busy master planning Cleveland’s waterfront.  Anyone care to take a guess at the new firm’s name?

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So You Want To Be An Architect? Think Twice

National
Friday, October 29, 2010
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Oh, to be a wide-eyed and optimistic student ready to enter architecture school and stake his or her claim in the world of starchitecture.  A humorous take on the soul-crushing, back-breaking, pain-inducing life of an architect.  Be warned, some language NSFW.

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Some of Our Faves from the AIA LA Awards

West
Thursday, October 28, 2010
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Eric Owen Moss’s Samitaur Tower, one of our faves

AIA/LA hosted its annual Design Awards last night at LACMA, an event that while not too full of people (that pesky recession) was full of astoundingly good projects. The AIA made us really happy, awarding AN a Presidential Award (Thanks AIA/LA President Paul Danna) for “Architectural Interpreter”. Aw Shucks.. Other notable winners included Firm of the Year Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects and Gold Medal winner Brenda Levin. Since there were a hefty number of Design Award winners, we’ve decided to pick out a few of our favorites. And so without further ado we present the first ever, completely unofficial, AIA/LA Awards Awards! Read More

Selldorf's Paved Paradise

East
Thursday, October 28, 2010
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A living room at 200 Eleventh Avenue.

My antipathy toward 200 Eleventh Avenue was partly on principle. The 250-foot condo with a garage off every unit—“just like a house in the suburbs,” chimed a spokesperson—seemed a flagrant abuse of the New Yorker code of honor to use public transportation, even if it’s an idling town car. And the stainless steel east-facing facade that houses the vertical parking lot presents a largely blank and uncommunicative face to the city. But a tour with architect Annabelle Selldorf made a quick convert of me, and an entire group of design journalists, as we traipsed through some nearly completed rooms in this 61,000-square-foot condo made for 16 duplex apartments (95% sold). Read More

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"Flat" LA Skyline Under Scrutiny

West
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
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If you think LA’s skyline seems a little flat, you’re not the only one.  Apparently LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa thinks so too. According to LA Department of Building and Safety General Manager Robert “Bud” Ovrom, the Mayor was disappointed at how the skyline stood in comparison to what he saw in a recent trip to China. The city’s flat-topped skyline was investigated in a two part-series from Curbed LA. We followed up with Ovrom. Read More

Scavolini Comes to Soho

East
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
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A racy new installment. (Scavolini)

If sleek Italian kitchens send your heart racing more than a Maserati ever could, stop by Scavolini’s new Soho location at 429 West Broadway for a test drive. Read More

Artist Proposes Fabric House Coat For St. Louis

Midwest
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
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Rendering showing proposed House Coat installation in St. Louis (Courtesy Leeza Meksin)

Rendering showing proposed House Coat installation in St. Louis (Courtesy Leeza Meksin)

Brooklyn-based artist Leeza Meksin plans to give an historic brick structure in St. Louis a new skin – or rather a new set of clothes.  House Coat proposes wrapping over 800 yards of spandex around the two-story building, complete with stylized “corset-like fixtures in the back, weights, [and] leather.”

Read more about the project after the jump.

Slideshow: Inglewood Plan Strives For Revitalization

West
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
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Scene along Inglewood's Market Street corridor (Sam Lubell)

Scene along Inglewood's Market Street corridor (Sam Lubell)

The Architect’s Newspaper‘s Sam Lubell tells us about revitalization plans for Los Angeles’ once bustling Inglewood.  Architects Christopher Mercier and Douglas Pierson of (fer) Studio see a vibrant future for Market Street:

“Nobody knows about Market Street,” said Mercier. “But it already has the infrastructure to be something special.” The street is narrow, pedestrian-friendly, and lined with shops, rich plantings, small islands, and beautiful (if not well-kempt) historic buildings along its entire length. “Everyone wants to save downtown, but they don’t have the faith in what it can be,” added Pierson.

Read the entire article about revitalizing Inglewood at The Architect’s Newspaper.
A slideshow of Inglewood’s Market Street after the jump.

Lisbon 2010> Pedro Gadanho's Inside Story

International
Tuesday, October 26, 2010
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Pedro Gadanho's Casa Baltasar in Porto, shown in this 2007 photograph by Fernando Guerra. (Courtesy Cristina Guerra)

The Lisbon Architecture Triennale may have aspirations to international importance, but is really more interesting for what it says about the city’s potential as a regional center rather than a world city like London or New York (more on that in my next post). While most of the Triennale’s three major exhibitions take place in large public event spaces, there is one “official” ancillary event in a small commercial art gallery that has something to contribute to the world architecture scene. Read More

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