A Stroll Through Modernism with Ezra Stoller

East
Thursday, January 6, 2011
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Ezra Stoller TWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, Eero Saarinen, New York, NY, 1962 Gelatin Silver Print © Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

An exhibition of architectural photographer Ezra Stoller’s work will open at the Yossi Milo Gallery tonight in New York and runs through February 12. A few of the photos are instantly recognizable, such as a photo of the Guggenheim lobby featuring women in pillbox hats standing in the foreground. But the gems of the show are those taken off the beaten path, like the roof of the Seagram’s Building or a parking garage in Miami.

To see more photos from the Stoller exhibit click here

Weekly World Trade Center Update

East
Wednesday, January 5, 2011
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Photos by Tom Stoelker

As there are few visible changes on the facade, this week’s photos focus on the reinforced concrete at the base of the tower. With much media fanfare, the NYPD opposed initial designs for security reasons. The resulting redesign introduced a fortress-like base and core, which is now visible from the street level. Eventually, the concrete will be shielded behind a metallic scrim, not unlike the one seen next door on Seven World Trade. For now though, pedestrians can glimpse the exposed base to get an idea of the tower’s extraordinary strength.

To see more photos of the tower’s base click here

Thursday is D Day for Broad Museum

West
Tuesday, January 4, 2011
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Site of the museum, on LA's Grand Avenue.

Finally. The design for Eli Broad’s new contemporary art museum in Downtown LA, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, is being unveiled on Thursday, according to a press release sent out today. The event will take place at 11:00 am at Walt Disney Concert Hall (next to the new museum site), giving us lazy journalists plenty of time to make it. According to the release, the museum will be “home to the worldwide headquarters of The Broad Art Foundation,” and will provide a home for Broad’s collection of more than 2,000 works by 200 artists. Since the museum saga has dragged out over several years between several cities, and because he’s hired one of the country’s top architects, Mr. Broad has done an excellent job of building our expectations. Hope it’s good!

Windy City Welcome Mats

Midwest
Tuesday, January 4, 2011
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Chicago is famously the city where cab drivers namedrop architects. This year there will be a new way for the general public to become even more well-versed in the city’s historic and contemporary architecture, openhousechicago. Modeled on successful programs in London, New York, and Toronto, openhousechicago will offer free access to more than 100 sites around the city, some of which are normally not open to the public, including the Center for Green Technology and the Burnham-designed Santa Fe Building. Organized by the Chicago Architecture Foundation, openhousechicago will run from October 14-16. Sites are still being nominated and volunteers are needed, so visit www.openhousechicago.org for more information or to get involved.

Carpenter Bridging Olmsted

Midwest
Friday, December 31, 2010
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(all photos: Andy Brake)

Earlier this year AN looked at Midway Crossings, designed by James Carpenter with lighting designers Schuler Shook and landscape architects BauerLatoza Studio, a project that uses light and urban design to create a visual connection across Frederick Law Olmsted’s Midway Plaisance. The project, formerly known as the Light Bridges, is now nearing completion, and the result seems to accomplish the goal of better joining the main campus of the University of Chicago with its expanding facilities across the park. Tall light poles and wider sidewalks with planted, raised easements create an inviting place for pedestrians, and the University hopes the two crossings, at 59th and 60th Streets, will create focused centers of foot traffic, improving safety.  Purists may feel that the University has co-opted public park space, but the design team’s use of light as the main element shows a light hand in the landscape. Read More

World Trade Center Continues Upward Despite Blizzard

East
Thursday, December 30, 2010
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The chaos of the blizzard seems to have bypassed the site.

[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, The Architect's Newspaper will be checking in each week for signs of progress at one of the country's most exciting construction sites. ]

The blizzard did little to deter holiday crowds from flocking to the World Trade Center this week. With few office workers in town, hundreds of tourists crushed onto the slushy sidewalks of Church Street. From behind St. Paul’s Chapel, a cacophony of languages could be heard. Construction moved forward with few signs of delay or disruption from this week’s snow and by Wednesday afternoon the site was humming as usual.

View more WTC pics after the jump.

MoMA′s Young Architects Program Heading to Rome

International
Thursday, December 23, 2010
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Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

The prestigious Young Architects Program put on by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA P.S.1 in New York has announced that it’s teaming up with Rome’s National Museum of 21st Century Arts, or MAXXI, to host a second outdoor installation at the new Zaha Hadid museum.
Read more: Officials hope for a local feel as finalists are announced.

Weekly World Trade Pic

East
Thursday, December 23, 2010
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Another row of windows and corner facets began to emerge this week.

[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, The Architect's Newspaper will be checking in each week for signs of progress at one of the country's most exciting construction sites. ]

The pre-holiday bustle reached a lull today at the World Trade Center site as much of downtown seems to have headed home. Even the cranes were moving at a sluggish pace; but they’re still moving. This week, the facets that form elongated triangular corners began to reflect the sunlight a bit more and another row of windows found their way onto the western facade. The holidays are taking hold, too: At dusk, sparkly lights that run the length of the cranes emerge like stars.

Another pic after the jump

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Pictorial> Architects Propose Rolling Hotel in Norway

International
Wednesday, December 22, 2010
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Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Architects propose a series of buildings rolling on tracks (Courtesy Jagnefalt Milton)

Swedish architects Jagnefalt Milton have proposed architectural locomotion for Åndalsnes, a town in Norway. A series of buildings would be built atop existing rail tracks in the city and could house various uses ranging from a rolling hotel to a rolling concert hall to a rolling public bath.

Get rolling on to the photos after the jump!

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Fumihiko Maki Named AIA Gold Medal Winner

International
Tuesday, December 21, 2010
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Fumihiko Maki Wins AIA's 2011 Gold Medal

Fumihiko Maki Wins AIA's 2011 Gold Medal (Photo Imogene Tudor)

 

Fumihiko Maki was named AIA’s 2011 Gold Medal winner last Thursday, making him the 67th in that illustrious line. Maki began his career in the 1960s as a part of the group of Japanese architects known as the Metabolists who championed large biomorphic structures that could expand and change as needed. His more recent designs, such as the new Media Lab at MIT, present a decidedly fixed composition, though MIT retains the suggestion of interchangeable volumes. The concept did find its way into Maki’s thoroughly adaptable interior, as was noted during a walk-through by AN last spring.

More on Maki after the jump.

New Whitney Museum Takes Flight Along the High Line

East, In Construction
Tuesday, December 21, 2010
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Whitney Museum rendering (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Cooper, Robertson & Partners)

Whitney Museum rendering (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Cooper, Robertson & Partners)

The Whitney Museum, set on an outpost far from Manhattan’s posh Upper East Side and in the midst of the hip yet historic Meatpacking District, is forging ahead with its grand plans to make a bold architectural statement with a new building by Renzo Piano, which will sit adjacent to Gansevoort Market Historic District and the post-industrial High Line park.

Read More

Philly President′s House Impeached

East
Tuesday, December 21, 2010
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The President's House Market Street facade suggests an executive mansion lost to time. (Photos Tom Stoelker)

The President's House Market Street facade suggests an executive mansion lost to time. (Photos Tom Stoelker)

It’s odd when the symbol of a building becomes more important than the structure itself. That’s certainly the case with the newly completed President’s House in Independence National Historic Park in Philadelphia. George Washington and John Adams lived there when the city was still the nation’s capitol. Unlike Independence Hall, The President’s House didn’t garner importance over time. Actually, there wasn’t a physical structure left, just ruins hidden below ground a few feet from the entrance to Liberty Bell Center and discovered in 2002.

Read more and check out the photos after the jump.

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