Rebuild By Design> Waggonner and Ball, unabridged Architecture’s Plan For Bridgeport, CT

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

The plan for Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Courtesy Waggoner and Ball, unabridged Architecture, Yale, and Arcadis)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how Waggonner and Ball, unabridged and Yale ARCADIS’ team plans to create a more resilient Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Read More

Review> 2014 Armory Art Week Improved With the Help of Architecture

Art, East, Review
Thursday, April 10, 2014
.
Sheila Hicks, Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column, 2013-14, left, (Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co) and Zoe Leonard, Sketch for 945 Madison Avenue, 2014, right. (Courtesy Zoe Leonard)

Sheila Hicks, Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column, 2013-14, left, (Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co) and Zoe Leonard, Sketch for 945 Madison Avenue, 2014, right. (Courtesy Zoe Leonard)

With the plethora of contemporary art on view in New York during Armory Arts week, it has been instructive to note the contribution by architects to the design of these temporary exhibition spaces, and the use of interesting architectural spaces. The fairs are often held in structures originally used for other purposes — piers, parking facilities, drill halls — so the task has been to not only carve out space for display, but to move viewers (and buyers) with flexibility and ease and to provide an enticing environment. Fair organizers have turned to young architects for these interior layouts, or have chosen compelling venues.

Read More

Yeezus! What a Jury! The Living and The Dead at MoMA PS1′s Young Architects Program

Design, East, Eavesdroplet
Thursday, April 10, 2014
.
The Living's pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The Living’s pavilion, Hy-Fi. (Courtesy The Living)

The MoMA PS 1 jury process that selected the “100 percent organic pavilion Hy-Fi” for its 2014 pavilion may have been a contentious group. The museum announced last month that David Benjamin, the principal of Brooklyn-based firm The Living, would design the temporary structure. But several sources have told Eavesdrop that one of the short listed firms (Collective-LOK, PARA-Project, WOJR, over,under, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, LAMAS, Pita + Bloom) was in fact told that it—not Benjamin—had won the design competition.

The story unfolds after the jump…

Rebuild By Design> HR&A’s Commercial Corridor Resiliency Project

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

Resiliency in Red Hook. (Courtesy HR&A/Cooper Robertson)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s how the team led by HR&A/Cooper Robertson plans to bring resiliency to the East Coast from the Rockaways to Red Hook.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Apertures, An Organism-like Installation at SCI-Arc, Opens Friday

West
Thursday, April 10, 2014
.
B+U's Apertures installation (Courtesy B+U)

B+U’s Apertures installation (Courtesy B+U)

On April 11, Los Angeles–based firm B+U will open their latest installation, called Apertures, at SCI-Arc Gallery. The structure, already assembled inside the space, is 16-feet-tall and made up of 233 1/8-inch-thick plastic panels. Its warped shape resembles a natural organ or organism (a heart? a strange alien plant?), and in many ways it acts like one.

Continue reading after the jump.

Center for Active Design Announces Winners of Excellence Awards

Awards, East
Thursday, April 10, 2014
.
Sephardic Community Center in Brooklyn by BKSK. (Courtesy Jeffrey Totaro)

Sephardic Community Center in Brooklyn by BKSK. (Courtesy Jeffrey Totaro)

The Center for Active Design has announced its first annual Excellence Awards, which recognizes the “role design plays in addressing the ongoing obesity and chronic disease epidemic.” The jury—which included AN’s William Menking—has selected winners out of more than 40 plans for buildings and public spaces that encourage healthy lifestyles. The Center, which was created under Mayor Bloomberg’s Obesity Task Force, will present the awards in New York City on May 19th. For more information on the winners and for tickets to the event, visit the Center’s website.

On View> “Apex: Tip Toland” at the Portland Art Museum

Art, On View, West
Thursday, April 10, 2014
.

04-portland-tip-toland-archpaper

Apex: Tip Toland
Portland Art Museum
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, Oregon
Through May 11

Washington-based artist Tip Toland creates larger than life figures with painfully accurate details that highlight her subjects’ imperfections: wrinkles, sunspots, and other blemishes. Toland’s work has always dealt with figurative subject matter, though her approach has ranged from the surreal to the super-real. This exhibition focuses on the plight of albino children in Africa, many of whom face a never-ending nightmare of bigoted, superstitious persecution at the hand of the communities into which they are born. Deeply rooted in psychology, Toland’s carefully crafted portraits seek to disturb viewers, teasing out their deepest human sympathies only to clobber them with the cudgel of political subtext. The artist has said that her work “softens our hearts to what we are afraid of.” Unflinching in the face of terrible realities, it is certainly provocative.

Huggable high-rises? Chicagoans look to kickstart a line of plush skyscraper replicas

squeeable skylines

Skyscrapers are usually admired for their mighty feats of structural engineering. Respect though you might the elegance with which Chicago’s Willis Tower lifts steel and glass 1,451 feet into the sky, you probably wouldn’t want to nuzzle it.

But a Chicago startup is out to change that.

Rebuild By Design> Sasaki’s Plan To Save the Beaches of the Jersey Shore

The Jersey shore in Sasaki's plan. (Courtesy Sasaki)

The Jersey shore in Sasaki’s plan. (Courtesy Sasaki)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s Sasaki’s plan to save the Jersey shore.

Read More

Rebuild By Design> Penn Design/OLIN’s Plan for South Bronx Resiliency

The Hunts Point Lifeline. (Courtesy Penn Design / OLIN)

The Hunts Point Lifeline. (Courtesy Penn Design / OLIN)

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s Penn Design and OLIN’s plan for the South Bronx.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> The Cincinnati Museum of Art Presents The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith

Art, Midwest, On View
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
.
(Courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

(Courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith
Cincinnati Museum of Art
953 Eden Park Drive
Cincinnati, OH
Through May 18

From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith consists of twenty-four pieces of silver and gold jewelry created by the Brooklyn-reared modernist jeweler Arthur Smith (1917–1982). Smith trained at Cooper Union and opened his first shop on Cornelia Street in Greenwich Village in 1946. Art was an active supporter of the black and gay rights movement and early black modern dance groups. He included these themes in his works.

Read More

Bittertang Farms to Present Their Harvest as one of AIA NY’s New Practices

East
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
.
Ice Palace installation, complete with a very cold cat. (Courtesy Bittertang Farms)

Ice Palace installation, complete with a very cold cat. (Courtesy Bittertang Farms)

Michael Loverich of Bittertang Farms, a firm recently announced as an inclusion in AIA New York’s New Practices New York exhibition, will be discussing his practice in a lecture affiliated with the upcoming show. The firm, or rather the farm’s unconventional name is reflected in projects that tend to stray into the realms of the organic and the sensory. Loverich partnered with Antonio Torres to form Bittertang, which has offices in New York and Southern Mexico. Entitled “Make It Squeel!!!!,” Loverich’s talk will be held on April 16th at 5:30 in the Häfele Showroom.

Register for the event, click here.

Page 34 of 434« First...1020...3233343536...405060...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License