Hudson Square Pushes to Reclaim Pedestrian Space

East, East Coast
Monday, November 22, 2010
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Street scene in  Hudson Square (Courtesy Hudson Square Connection)

Street scene in Hudson Square (Courtesy Hudson Square Connection)

A major transformation of the once-industrial Hudson Square neighborhood in Lower Manhattan aims to bring pedestrian vitality to streets originally designed for delivery trucks servicing printing houses.  Crain’s reports that Hudson Square Connections, the local business improvement district, has selected a design group led by Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects from a pool of 23 respondents to create a new streetscape to improve the area’s image.

More on the plan to balance the area’s changing demographics.

Celebrating Sustainability at Chicago's Art Institute

Midwest
Monday, November 22, 2010
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Party-goers holding court at Chicago's Art Institute (photos: Andrew Hensley)

On November 17, The Architect’s Newspaper and Buro Happold, along with our other event partners Dow Building Solutions, Graphisoft, American Hydrotech, and Adaptive Building Initiative, celebrated GreenBuild at the Art Institute of Chicago’s Modern Wing. Renzo Piano’s LEED certified building proved to be a stylish venue for the hundreds of architects, engineers, designers, and other assorted revelers. Click through for pictures of some of the evening’s hundreds of party-goers. It was quite the green scene! Read More

Stay Up To Date with AN on Facebook and Twitter

Other
Monday, November 22, 2010
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Can’t get enough architecture and design news?  Neither can we.  Now you can stay on the cutting edge of the latest industry news and insightful critique from The Architect’s Newspaper by liking us on Facebook or following us on Twitter?  It’s an easy way to stay informed and share stories from The Architect’s Newspaper with your friends.

You can also have clutter-free highlights from The Architect’s Newspaper delivered to your inbox every Monday morning.  We hand select the top news and blog stories along with upcoming events and competitions to help get your week started off right.  Sign up for our e-newsletter today!

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A Shiny New Neighbor for the Farnsworth House

Midwest
Friday, November 19, 2010
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Virginia Tech's Lumenhaus is completely self-powered and the exterior is lit with subtle building-integrated LEDs at night. (All photos of the Lumenhaus: Jim Stroup)

Virginia Tech’s Solar Decathlon-winning Lumenhaus is currently cooling its heals in the opulent surroundings of Millennium Park. The house, which has been touring the globe, was brought to town to coincide with GreenBuild, and is remaining on view through Saturday. The compact house is efficiently designed both in terms of space and energy use, and is completely self-sustaining. Though its stay in Millennium Park will be brief, it’s not going far. The house will be stored on the grounds of the Farnsworth House for the winter and will be open to the public when it reopens for the spring season in April 2011. Whitney French, executive director of the Farnsworth House, sees a deep connection between the two structures.  Read More

The Straw That Broke the Silver Towers' Back

East, East Coast
Friday, November 19, 2010
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Fourth tower at NYU cancelled (Rendering courtesy Grimshaw and MVVA)

The proposed fourth tower at NYU is being reconsidered. (Rendering courtesy Grimshaw and MVVA)

I.M. Pei speaks and NYU listens. The university announced this week that plans for a Grimshaw-designed residential highrise planned for Pei’s landmarked Silver Towers block will be scrapped after the architect expressed disapproval over the project. The proposed 400-foot tower set amid three original concrete structures had been a point of conflict between NYU and its neighbors.

Read more after the jump.

Artist Creates Amazing Breathing Wall From Trash Bags

Other
Friday, November 19, 2010
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One Hundred and Eight installation (Courtesy Nils Völker)

One Hundred and Eight installation (Courtesy Nils Völker)


Artist Nils Völker has created a breathing wall comprised of trash bags and cooling fans. One Hundred and Eight selectively inflates a grid of, you guessed it, 108 bags to create a strikingly simple yet poetic result.  The softness of the trash bags rising and falling is really something to see. The installation can also interact with the viewer, sensing a person’s presence before the wall.  From the artist:

Although each plastic bag is mounted stationary the sequences of inflation and deflation create the impression of lively and moving creatures which waft slowly around like a shoal. But as soon a viewer comes close it instantly reacts by drawing back and tentatively following the movements of the observer. As long as he remains in a certain area in front of the installation it dynamically reacts to the viewers motion. As soon it does no longer detect someone close it reorganizes itself after a while and gently restarts wobbling around.

Can you imagine this idea translated to the scale of architecture? Cloud-like hallways – or even full facades – might actively follow passers by with a gently inflating and deflating rhythm. [ Via Today and Tomorrow. ]

Watch the video after the jump.

Fortress Ground Zero? Security Tactics Debated for WTC Towers

East
Friday, November 19, 2010
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The Memorial and 1 World Trade Center rise. (Photo: LMCCC)

On Wednesday, architects and developers gathered to hear colleagues hold forth on the topic of “Innovation by Necessity” at New York’s Center for Architecture, a panel that seemed to promise a semi-sleepy discussion of building information modeling (BIM) at the World Trade Center site. But after several speakers outlined the logistics of the vast construction project, the panel veered into another topic entirely: an eye-opening primer on security strategies at Ground Zero.

Read More

Terence Riley to Head 2011 Shenzhen/Hong Kong Biennale

International
Friday, November 19, 2010
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Photo courtesy Miami New Times

Terence Riley has been selected to head the Shenzhen & Hong Kong Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture. After leaving his post as chief curator of architecture and design at MoMA, Riley set out to revamp the Miami Art Museum. Key to his tenure in Miami was a drive to move the museum into a new $100 million building designed by Herzog & de Meuron. But with economic downturn, the project stalled and Riley resigned in October of 2009.

The new appointment makes him the first non-Chinese curator to head the five-year-old event. The program, which will be announced next year, focuses on the unique character of Hong Kong, Shenzhen and on young cities in particular. As Shenzhen’s extraordinary growth has taken it from a fishing village to a major metropolis in only the past 50 years, it’s a natural fit for the event.

“The full program is still being developed, but our idea is to create a paradigm that considers the cyclical growth pattern of urban cities such as Shenzhen, where cities create architecture, architecture creates cities, and how the process continues without end,” Riley said in a statment. “At a time when sustainability is imperative, the idea of describing an open process that takes into account its own renewal and constant evolution is essential.”

A Giant Loom On Neutra VDL Roof? Let Us Explain..

West
Thursday, November 18, 2010
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Richard Neutra’s VDL House in Silver Lake has been fitted with a new rooftop installation called Fort da Sampler, by Mexico City-based artist Santiago Borja.  The project is centered around a temporary textile loom literally made out of the famous house’s horizontal rooftop steel beams. Now THAT’s a new use for architecture… On the loom the artist, along with the help of a crafstwoman from Chiapas, created a woolen artwork fitted with colorful, Myan-inspired symbols. The project is the first art installation at the home, and curator Sarah Lorenzen says she hopes there are more to follow. She also shares the news that the first of three phases of renovation at the house—centered on the roof and the adjacent garden unit— has been completed pro bono by LA firm Marmol Radziner. This includes new parapets, new plaster, repaired trellises, a partially waterproofed and resealed roof, new planters and landscaping, and the transfer of all plumbing to the inside of the building. Future phases will include site drainage, a new roof deck, more waterproofing, repaired windows, and refinished interiors.

Envisioning a Green Future for the BQE

East, East Coast
Thursday, November 18, 2010
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"Green Canopy" proposal for the BQE (Courtesy Starr Whitehouse)

"Green Canopy" proposal for the BQE (Courtesy Starr Whitehouse)

The proposals are in after Monday’s final public meeting to decide the future of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway trench which severs the Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, and Columbia Street Waterfront neighborhoods of Brooklyn. Residents spoke up and prioritized their wishes for a less disruptive BQE including reduced noise and pollution, increased neighborhood connectivity and bike / pedestrian safety, and an overall greener streetscape.

In short, the BQE is going green, or at least as green as a pollution-spewing six-lane highway can be.  Luckily the NYC EDC, NYC DOT, and Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects have come up with three compelling design solutions to improve the area.

Learn more and check out the renderings after the jump.

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MoMA Announces PS1 Young Architects Finalists

East
Thursday, November 18, 2010
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"Lentspace" by MoMA finalist Interboro at Varick St. & 6th Ave. (photo: Michael Falco, NYTimes)

One of the most sought after awards for emerging architecture firms was announced today. MoMA PS1 selected finalists for the 2011 Young Architects Program. The plum prize is an opportunity to design the garden space for MoMA PS1 in Long Island City, Queens. For the next three months the firms will finalize their designs and the winner will be announced in February. Past winners have included Hernan Diaz Alonso, MOS Architects, OBRA, So-Il and Work AC. This year’s firms include three from Brooklyn, one from Boston and a Brit. From Brooklyn the firms are FormlessFinder, Interboro Partners and Matter Architecture Practice. MASS Design Group comes from Boston and IJP Corporation Architects are based in London.  See work from the other finalists after the jump.

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Beauty Bites Back with Peter Cook's Crab

East
Thursday, November 18, 2010
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Peter Cook's scheme for the Taiwan Tower Conceptual Design competition. (Courtesy Crab)

Peter Cook–the real one from England, not the Hampton socialite architect impersonator–was in town last week and showed us some of the work from his firm Crab. Sir Peter was here to appear on a panel at Pratt Institute for the new book by Yael Reisner with Fleur Watson, Architecture and Beauty: Conversations with Architects About a Troubled Relationship. Cook and fellow beauticians including Will Alsop, Gaetano Pesce, Lebbeus Woods, KOL/MAC, and Hernan Diaz Alonso all took the subject head-on, and proved they think about aesthetics and form up front in the design process, though they seldom will admit to it. They did nothing to dispel Reisner’s thesis that even though, since the advent of modernism, only principles of rationalism are allowed to be used in explaining the building arts, architecture is still primarily a formal practice in the spirit of Einstein, who said that for him “visual imagery occurred first and words followed.” Read More

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