Video> Exhibition Recalls NY′s Lost Garden of Eden

East, East Coast, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 15, 2011
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Adam Purple's Garden of Eden in the Lower East Side (Photo by Harvey Wang)

Adam Purple's Garden of Eden in the Lower East Side (Photo by Harvey Wang)

As he watched his Manhattan neighborhood crumble and burn around him in the urban decay of the 1970s, Adam Purple decided to build a garden. For roughly a decade from the 1970s until 1985, Purple’s Garden of Eden earthwork expanded with concentric circles as more and more buildings were torn down. Photographer Harvey Wang is marking the 25th anniversary of the garden’s destruction with an exhibition at the Fusion Arts gallery running through February 20.

Click through for more info and a video about the exhibition.

Quick Clicks> Green, Trolley, Bike, and Soane Booms

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, February 15, 2011
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New York by Gehry nee 8 Spruce nee Beekman Tower (Courtesy dbox)

New York by Gehry neé 8 Spruce neé Beekman Tower (Courtesy dbox)

Green Boom. Blair Kamin takes a look at the sustainability of two billowing icons in Chicago and New York. Studio Gang’s Aqua Tower is going for LEED certification while Frank Gehry’s New York tower will not seek the USGBC’s approval but claims to be green nonetheless. Kamin notes the importance of such moves, saying of Gehry: “What he, in particular, does–or doesn’t do–can have enormous influence, not simply on architects but on developers.”

Trolley Boom. NPR has a piece on the explosion of streetcars across the country with planned or completed systems in over a dozen cities.

Bike Boom. Cycling advocate Elly Blue discusses a new study on Grist stating that bikes deserve their own infrastructure independent from autos. And not just a striped bike lane, Blue notes, but separated lanes called “cycle tracks” like one installed along Brooklyn’s Prospect Park West.

Soane Boom. The Independent reports on a planned renovation to the Sir John Soane Museum in London, that architect’s treasure trove of antiquities and architectural memorabilia from across the world. Plans include opening up a new floor that hasn’t been open to the public since Soane died in 1837.

Bus Bonanza Expected at WTC Memorial

East, East Coast
Tuesday, February 15, 2011
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Memorial grove and the Museum Pavilion under construction.

While most of the World Trade Center site whirls in mid-construction, the National September 11 Memorial is a mere 208 days from completion. That thought brings both relief and consternation to local residents who have seen their neighborhood become a national flash point for mourning, controversy, and debate. It is also about to become one of the most heavily trafficked tourist destinations in the country.

Read more after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Mega Watts, Luck, Mattise, Like Jane

Daily Clicks
Monday, February 14, 2011
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Watts Towers (Courtesy Robert Garcia / Flickr)

Watts Towers (Courtesy Robert Garcia / Flickr)

Mega Watts. The Los Angeles Times reports that the James Irvine Foundation has granted $500,000 toward the preservation of LA’s Watt’s Towers, declaring the folk-art stalagmites “an important cultural icon.” (Photo courtesy Robert Garcia/Flickr)

Luck in School. The NY Times relays the story of Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck who has chosen to pursue a degree in architectural design at Stanford’s School of Engineering rather than head off to the NFL draft. We wish Mr. Luck, well, all the best in his endeavors, but life as an architect can make the NFL seem like a walk in the park.

Al Matisse? Variety brings us news that Al Pacino has been selected to play Henri Matisse in an upcoming film called Masterpiece detailing the French painter’s relationship with his nurse, model, and muse Monique Bourgeois. Producers will soon be looking for female leads.

Like Jane. The Rockefeller Foundation is accepting nominations for this year’s Jane Jacobs Medal honoring two living individuals who have improved the vitality of NYC and, among other things, “open our eyes to new ways of seeing and understanding our city.”

Won′t You Be Our Valentine?

National
Monday, February 14, 2011
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Minneapolis Riverfront Redesign Team Selected

Midwest, Newsletter
Friday, February 11, 2011
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(Courtesy TLS/KVA)

(Courtesy TLS/KVA)

The Berkeley, California and Boston-based team of Tom Leader Studio and Kennedy & Violich Architecture has won a competition for the potential redevelopment 5.5 miles of the Minneapolis Riverfront. Their proposal, called RiverFIRST bested those by rivals Ken Smith, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, and Turenscape, and includes constructed wetlands for stormwater management, manmade islands for habitat, new districts for green industry among other features.

While no specific segment of the plan has yet been identified for development, the team will be given a commission by the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board.

A project video and gallery await after the jump.

Quick Click> Islands, Dykes, Riverside, Stateside

Daily Clicks
Friday, February 11, 2011
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View of New York Harbor, 1999, from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, courtesy Design Observer.

Double Dutch. First Manhattan, now Governor’s Island–the Dutch just can’t get enough of New York Harbor. Adriaan Geuze of West 8 talks with author Brian Davis about West 8′s proposal for a new public park on “the island next to the island at the center of the world,” via Design Observer.

No more Jersey Shore? Speaking of the Dutch, oceanography professor Malcolm Brown told WYNC that residents of the New York-New Jersey area should brush up on their dyke-building skills, warning that higher sea levels may come sooner than we think, via Transportation Nation

City Center. Planetizen pointed us to a fascinating post on Per Square Mile about Cahokia, a pre-Columbian settlement on the Mississippi, which, until Philadelphia surpassed it ca. 1800, was the largest city in North America.

Start Spreading the News. New York: If you can make there…well, it doesn’t guarantee you’ll make it in Moscow. For whatever it’s worth, New York now ranks as the most affordable of the four cities that the world’s wealthiest citizens are likely to call home. New York beats out Moscow–yes, Moscow–as well as Hong Kong and London. The Real Deal quotes a study conducted by Savills PLC, an affiliate of Stribling.

BOOM BOOM BOOM In The Desert

West
Friday, February 11, 2011
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Ok, get ready for the strangest, most audacious project you’ve seen in a long time. Our friends at Architizer just tipped us off to BOOM, a $250 million community being developed in Rancho Mirage, outside of Palm Springs, that includes some pretty inventive, or (maybe more like it) wacky designs by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, LOT-EK, J.Mayer H., and seven more firms. The ultra-expressive project, set to begin construction next year, will include 300 residences built in eight neighborhoods, each designed by a different firm (important note: the developer, Matthias Hollwich, is a co-founder of Architizer). Read More

reOrder: An Architectural Environment by Situ Studio

Fabrikator
Friday, February 11, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator

02.11.2011

Brought to you by:


3form

reOrder: An Architectural Environment by Situ Studio

Jennifer K. Gorsche

Just months after Ennead completed its renovation of Brooklyn Museum’s Great Hall, originally designed in 1897 by McKim, Mead & White, Situ Studio will transform the 10,000-square-foot colonnaded space with a site-specific installation set to open March 4. Entitled reOrder: An Architectural Environment by Situ Studio, the work will transform the hall’s 16 classical columns with nearly 2,200 yards of Sunbrella Canvas-Natural fabric, which is to be folded and stretched over suspended bent-steel tubing and plywood rings with diameters ranging from 5 to 20 feet. Beneath the fabric shapes, Situ will install benches and tables fabricated with LG Hausys HI-MACS solid surfacing, creating the rounded benches with a controlled heat process called thermoforming.

A temporary installation creates new interactive space at Brooklyn Museum

  • FabricatorSitu Studio
  • DesignerSitu Studio
  • LocationBrooklyn, New York
  • Completion DateMarch 4, 2011
  • MaterialSunbrella fabric donated by Glen Raven Custom Fabrics, LG Hausys HI-MACS solid surfacing, donated by LG Hausys
  • ProcessControlled folding, thermoforming

Read More

Filed Under: 

Community Board 4 Welcomes Bjarke to New York

East, East Coast
Thursday, February 10, 2011
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Proposed W57 tower viewed from the Hudson River (Courtesy BIG)

Proposed W57 tower viewed from the Hudson River (Courtesy BIG)

Bjarke Ingels’ star-studded ascendancy to New York architecture fame was checked last night as Community Board 4′s land-use committee had its first look at Durst Fettner Residential’s planned W57 tower in Hell’s Kitchen. Already sobered by a two-hour discussion of planned zoning changes only blocks from BIG’s courtyard-skyscraper hybrid, the board quietly sat through Ingels’ signature multimedia show detailing the strenuous process that guided the sloping tower’s design.

Read more about the public unveiling after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Barrios, Shopping Atlantic, Blah, Egypt

Daily Clicks
Thursday, February 10, 2011
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A section of the barrios in Bogata from Harry Murzyn and David Varon.

Barrios with Altitude. A poetic study of the organically evolving perimeter of Bogotá, via Lebbeus Woods.

Atlantic Aspirations. Forest City Ratner is still on the hunt for Atlantic Yards funding, but has sweetened the deal by tapping SHoP–who is already spiffing up the stadium and public plaza–to design B2, the first apartment building in the complex, says The Observer.

Sterile Street. Blair Kamin calls out developer Joe Sitt for obliterating “bracing history” in exchange for “bland consistency” on State Street, in The Chicago Times.

Impromptu Planning. In Egypt, protesters have organized a mini-city in Tahir Square, complete with urban planners. Listen to an NPR audio clip or read the related transcript.

Unveiled> BIG Wins Again in Greenland

International
Thursday, February 10, 2011
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(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

Bjarke Ingels continues his relentless forward march toward world domination, winning yet another project, this time a gallery in Nuuk, Greenland. With so many recent mountains, it appears BIG has moved on to new iconographies inspired by land art, a barnacle perhaps?

Check out the details after the jump.

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