Quick Clicks> Anti-Mies, Timber, Thunder, Head Start

Daily Clicks
Friday, March 4, 2011
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An indoor/outdoor water pool fantasy for Chicago's Navy Pier. Courtesy Ian Dingman/Time Out

 

Mies Bashing. For all the glory of Modernist Chicago, there are still those who mourn the loss of the White City‘s Beaux Arts influence. Historian David Garrard tells WBEZ of the “sterile” Daley Center‘s ruinous effect on The Loop. One has to wonder what he’d make of Time Out Chicago’s “Fifteen Fanciful Ways to Fix Navy Pier.”

Tiiiimmmmbeeeeerrrrr! Meanwhile, at another Navy locale…Chuck Schumer is hopping mad about contorting being done by the U.S. Army to get out of repairing the 158-year-old Timber Shed at Brooklyn’s Navy Yard. The Brooklyn Paper reports that the senator is pressing army brass, which still has control over the building, to fix it or get out of the way and let the city do it.

For Sale: Beach front property, water views, lively neighborhood. WSJ reports that the land where Coney Island‘s famed Thunderbolt roller coaster scared the bejesus out of generations of New Yorkers can now be had for $75 million to $95 million.

Way Head Start. NYC Department of Buildings launched their Junior Architects and Engineers Program this week at PS31, reports NY1. (The news clip, starring fifth grade Frank Lloyd Wright fan Thomas Patras, is just too cute to pass up.)

SEPTA Station Benches: Veyko

Fabrikator
Friday, March 4, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

Veyko's SEPTA bench (Todd Mason/Barry Halkin Photography)

Bent stainless steel benches in Philly’s SEPTA station are designed to stand the ultimate urban test.

A subway bench never proves itself on the first day. That was one of the things that interested the designers at Veyko, a Philadelphia-based metal fabrication shop, when they set out to compete for a federally-funded Art In Transit commission to design benches for Philadelphia’s 8th Street SEPTA station.

Read more after the jump.

Navarro’s Enlightened Edifices

East
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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Navarro's Armory Fence at Kasman Gallery's booth.

The Brooklyn-based Chilean artist Ivan Navarro will take to the floor at the Amory Show tonight, as well as to the walls at the Paul Kasmin Gallery on West 27th St. and 10th Ave. “The Armory Fence” installation outlines the entirety of the gallery’s booth as a humming neon riff on a conventional suburban fence. At 23 by 36 feet it cuts quite a substantial swath of real estate at the fair. At the gallery, neon wall sculptures inspired by some of the world’s most famous buildings suggest a disco take on the familiar icons, but a second glance reveals a deeper sense of gravity, with words like “surrender” or “abandon” subtly etched atop the glass.

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Quick Clicks> Sprawl, Prize, Endangered, Bids

Daily Clicks
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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Tightening the Greenbelt. Per Square Mile explores why greenbelts fail to hold back city sprawl. Using London and San Francisco as examples, Tim De Chant writes that perimeter actually parks attract suburbs to form outside their borders.

Role of a lifetime. The AIA has awarded Portland U’s Sergio Palleroni the Latrobe Prize for his research on the role of architects in future public interest projects. A Portland Architecture interview plays well with De Chant’s article above, as Palleroni casts a critical eye on Portland’s sprawl.

Going, Going. The list of the top seven endangered buildings in Chicago was today released by Preservation Chicago. Curbed Chicago pounced on list an hour after it went online. At the very top is a relative youngin’: the 1975 Prentice Tower (by Mies student Bertrand Goldberg), whose uncertain fate AN‘s Julie Iovine covered in a recent issue.

Bids 4 Bush… Bids for yet another NYC waterfront property are begin accepted by the New  York Economic Development Corporation Crain’s reports, and this one comes with a 99-year ground lease. The 130,000 square-foot property sits on Gowanus Bay at Bush Terminal in Sunset Park Brooklyn.

 

 

A Pictorial Description of Broadway in 1899

East
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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Broadway, East Side. Wall to Liberty St. (Courtesy NYPL)

Broadway, East Side. Wall to Liberty St. (Courtesy NYPL)

Last week, we came across illustrator James Gilliver Hancock’s series of playful block elevations titled “All the Buildings in New York.” It turns out this impulse to sketch block upon block of New York’s architecture has been around for quite some time. In 1899, the Mail & Express newspaper company published a graphic journey down Manhattan’s Broadway in a book called A Pictorial description of Broadway now archived at the New York Public Library.

The stroll down Broadway 112 years ago reveals just how much New York has evolved over the past century. As the NYPL says, “The result, as you can see here, is a 19th century version of Google’s Street View, allowing us to flip through the images block by block, passing parks, churches, novelty stores, furriers, glaziers, and other businesses of the city’s past.”

Check out some of our favorite blocks after the jump.

Last Chance> Paradise Lost in New York

East, On View
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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Courtesy Andrea Blum

Courtesy Andrea Blum

  • Paradise Lost by Andrea Blum
  • Sikkema Jenkins & Co
  • 530 W. 22 Street
  • New York, NY
  • Through March 5

The dialogue between architects and artists in New York is one of the great-if often over looked- strengths of practice in this city. In fact, many architects visit New York not to see the latest building, but the exhibits in its galleries and museums. It has been the case, at least since MOMA’s epic modernism exhibit of 1932 and later Frederic Kielser’s Endless House series of exhibitions that the conversation between architects and artists in this city is endlessly complex and without equal in any other city.

Read more after the jump.

Event> Elegy: Reflections on Angkor in Beverly Hills

West
Thursday, March 3, 2011
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(Courtesy John McDermott)

(Courtesy John McDermott)

  • Elegy: Reflections On Angkor, Photographs By John McDermott
  • Sundaram Tagore Gallery
  • 9606 S. Santa Monica Blvd.
  • Beverly Hills, CA
  • Through March 12

In Elegy: Reflections On Angkor, John McDermott’s monochromatic photographs of the famous Hindu-Buddhist temple complex in the jungle of Cambodia are a haunting paean to an inspiring and sacred place. Made up of a complex of temples and holy spaces, which the World Monuments Fund called “one of the most significant buildings erected during the ancient Khmer empire,” Angkor is a site under siege from an influx of tourists as well as the elements of modern day life. Using specialized black and white film, McDermott captures the ghostly grandeur of the former the seat of the Khmer empire and produces sepia-toned silver gelatin prints, like Twisted Tree, Ta Prohm, 2001 (after the jump). He photographed the temple complex at Angkor before restoration efforts began on this UNESCO World Heritage Site, providing a glimpse of monuments in a state that no longer exists.

Check out a couple more photos after the jump.

Quick Clicks> On Decq, Walkup, Toxic Town, Pei OK

Daily Clicks
Wednesday, March 2, 2011
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Shanghai Information Center by Odile Decq (Courtesy Odile Decq)

Shanghai Information Center by Odile Decq (Courtesy Odile Decq)

Odile Speaks. French architect Odile Decq, designer of the recently completed Macro Museum in Rome, will be delivering a lecture at Hunter College in New York on Friday, March 4. The event takes place on the second floor of the MFA building (450 West 41st Street) at 6:00 PM.

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Neon Baby!

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, March 2, 2011
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A sign from the Golden Nugget, which was taken down when Steve Wynne renovated the casino.

We’ve recently returned from Las Vegas, where we visited one of the coolest institutions in the world: The Neon Museum, located on the far northern end of The Strip. The museum, about to celebrate its 15th anniversary, and ready to open its new visitors center next year (a rehab of the swooping, Paul Williams-designed La Concha Hotel), features a beautiful jumble of over 150 old signs that tell the story of Vegas, from mobster Bugsy Siegal’s El Cortes Hotel and Casino to the Moulin Rouge, Vegas’ first integrated casino, to the Atomic Age Stardust.

 

 

Read more after the jump.

Red Lights and Green Lights in Central Park

East
Tuesday, March 1, 2011
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Cyclist vs. pedestrians in Central Park. Photo: Tom Stoelker/ The Architect's Newspaper

Captain Philip Wishnia, commander of the Central Park Precinct, went before the CB7’s Parks and Environment Committee on Monday night to explain the rash of speeding tickets being given to bicyclists in Central Park. Wishna said that the spike in ticketing is part of a larger citywide initiative to crack down on bikers before the weather warms up. Cyclists can expect tickets for speeding, going the wrong way, riding bikes on pathways and not coming to a complete stop at red lights. The captain pointed out that in 2008 there were 60 bike accidents, but in 2010 there were 122.  The ticket is a criminal court summons that can affect points on the biker’s drivers license and cost at least $270.

Read more after the jump.

Event> Architecture-Made Music

East, On View
Tuesday, March 1, 2011
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Diagram of Blake Carrington's Cathedral Scan (Courtesy Blake Carrington)

Diagram of Blake Carrington’s Cathedral Scan (Courtesy Blake Carrington)

Architecture is often referred to as frozen music, but with a little digital technology, artist Blake Carrington has learned to capture the “diverse rhythms, drones and textures” from the stone walls of cathedrals. In his aural performances called Cathedral Scan, Carrington uses a church’s floor plan combined with the space’s unique acoustics to create to generate his his unique architectural sounds. Here’s more from the artist:

Groups of scanners filling the sonic spectrum may act in synch, forming a single harmonically-dense rhythm, or they may scan the plans at different speeds, resulting in complex polyrhythms. Each plan is treated as a modular score, with a distinct rhythm and timbre of its own. Also, by varying the speed and intensity of each scanning group, drone-like sounds may emerge based on the “resonant frequency” of the black and white plan.

This Thursday, March 3, Carrington will reveal the hidden sound of New York’s Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral for a CD release concert. He will be joined by audiovisual artists Mark Cetilia (of Mem1) and Kamran Sadeghi. More information on the AN events diary. (Via BldgBlog.)

Watch a video excerpt of Cathedral Scan after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Wren, Denver, Pike, & Livability

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, March 1, 2011
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London Skyline with Wren's cathedral at right (Courtesy James Cridland/flickr)

London Skyline with Wren’s cathedral at right (Courtesy James Cridland/flickr)

Wren’s Dome. Some 300 years ago, Christopher Wren completed St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. Now with today’s modern icons transforming the city’s skyline, the Telegraph pays homage to his lasting landmark amongst the new “Shards, Gherkins and distorted walkie-talkie-shaped skyscrapers.”

Read More

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