World Trade Weekly: Lunch Break Edition

East, East Coast
Wednesday, February 2, 2011
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[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, AN stops by the massive construction site for a weekly update. ]

Lunchtime at the World Trade Center site is a colorful sight even on an overcast and foggy day. Hundreds of construction workers in bright yellow and orange safety vests pour into neighborhood delis and pizza joints, but most crowd into the tiny local gourmet food store, the Amish Market. There, burly gents in hard hats hum to the Nat King Cole soundtrack while choosing prosciutto over pastrami. Make no mistake, these guys know food.

Back at the site, just two bays of the Deutsche Bank remain to tear down, a row of windows appeared on the northwest corner of One World Trade, and the steel mullions for a glass curtain wall began to wrap their way around Snøhetta‘s Museum Pavilion.

A photo tour of the construction site just after the jump.

Turrets, Trumpets, and Baseball Greats

East, East Coast, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 2, 2011
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Addisleigh Park residents clockwise from top: Ella Fitzgerald, Count Bassie, Fats Waller, Milt Hinton, Jackie Robinson and Lena Horne. (Courtesy: NYC LPC, Jazzagemusic.com)

Yesterday morning, after a bevy of Modernist aficionados crowded into the Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing room to tout the merits of Bunshaft’s interiors at the  Manufacturers Hanover Trust, the commission turned their focus to two historic African American neighborhoods: Sandy Ground in Staten Island and Addisleigh Park in Queens. The unanimous vote for the landmarks designations passed on the first day of Black History Month.

Read More

Quick Clicks> Piano, Plazas, Babbling, Budget Cuts

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Wednesday, February 2, 2011
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Updated plans for Columbia's Jerome L. Greene Science Center in Manhattanville (Via NY Observer)

Updated plans for Columbia's Jerome L. Greene Science Center in Manhattanville (Via NY Observer)

Manhattanville’s Piano. While tallying who is the biggest landlord in New York (it’s still the church by a hair), The Observer uncovered a few new views of Renzo Piano’s Jerome L. Green Science Center at Columbia’s Manhattanville campus, seen here next to a train viaduct.

Pedestrianizing New York. The remaking of New York’s public spaces continues its forward march. Brownstoner has details on the planned pedestrian plaza on Myrtle Avenue in Brooklyn and StreetsBlog highlights DOT’s plans to create a permanent block-long Plaza de las Americas in Washington Heights.

Archi-babble. Witold Rybczynski talkes issue with architecture’s professional jargon in Slate, including a beginner’s guide to commonly used words from assemblage to gesamtkunstwerk. What’s your favorite word from the language of architecture?

Subway Squeeze. We’re not talking about your crowded commute, but New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposal to trim $100 million from transit. Transportation Nation and StreetsBlog have the details and implications for getting around New York.

Lighting Inspired By Cronkite

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, February 1, 2011
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Architects and lighting designers united last week for Spark, an evening sponsored by the Professional Lighting Designers Association (PLDA) and the LA Forum for Architecture and Urban Design, featuring presentations on the theme of “Inspiration” at the V Lounge in Santa Monica. The Pecha Kucha format, in which 10 speakers are allowed to spend only 20 seconds on each of their 20 slides, shed (ahem..) light on lighting, architecture, and the ways they combine to create space. Read More

Unveiled> BIG Designs a Power Plant That Loves You

International
Tuesday, February 1, 2011
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Waste-to-Energy Plant in Copenhapen (Courtesy BIG)

Waste-to-Energy Plant in Copenhapen (Courtesy BIG)

Where one architect might see an incinerator, Bjarke Ingels, principal at Dutch firm BIG, envisions a ski slope. Ingels has been fond of the mountain typology and he hasn’t been all that subtle about it, giving projects names like Mountain Dwellings and emblazoning Mount Everest on the side.

In his latest competition-winning proposal for Copenhagen, BIG takes the concept one step further, with a mountain you can actually ski down.

And it blows smoke rings, too!

Quick Clicks> Greenways Coast to Coast

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Tuesday, February 1, 2011
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Planned pedestrian and bike path under the Hells Gate Bridge (Courtesy NYCEDC)

Planned pedestrian and bike path under the Hells Gate Bridge (Courtesy NYCEDC)

Hell’s Gate. Gothamist reports that the NYC Economic Development Corporation is planning to spruce up a trail beneath the Hell’s Gate Bridge railroad trestle on Randall’s Island. The pedestrian and bike path will eventually connect to the South Bronx Greenway.

Portlandia Greenway. A multi-use path planned since 2004 is finally getting underway in Portland, according to Bike Portland. The South Waterfront Greenway Trail might not feature those great archways from the Hell’s Gate Bridge, but it does offer another innovation: separated pedestrian and bike paths.

Biking JFK. Golden Gate Park could be much more bikable this spring. StreetsBlog says a bright green dedicated, bi-directional bike lane is planned along San Francisco’s John F. Kennedy Drive and will eventually connect western neighborhoods with downtown and park attractions.

Have you’re say. The Brooklyn Greenway Initiative and the Regional Plan Association are hosting a visioning workshop for a planned greenway in Red Hook, Brooklyn. You can voice your suggestions for the Columbia Street Waterfront Park tomorrow, February 2 at 6:30PM.

Bunshaft Deconstructed?

East, East Coast
Monday, January 31, 2011
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Manufacturer’s Trust Company, Fifth Avenue, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York, NY, 1954 Gelatin Silver Print © Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

The Landmarks Preservation Commission has put the Gordon Bunshaft-designed Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company Building onto its Public Meeting/Public Hearing agenda for tomorrow morning at 9:30AM. Up for discussion will be the building’s first and second floor interiors, including the entrance lobby, escalators, teller counters, and floor and ceiling surfaces.

The iconic vault designed by Henry Dreyfuss, which is visible from Fifth Avenue, and Harry Bertoia’s multifaceted metallic screen both made it on to the agenda. But according to Theodore Grunewald of the Coalition to Save MHT, the Bertoia has already been removed by Chase Bank, the sculpture’s owner.

Read More

Quick Clicks> Trees, Robin Hood, Complete, Urbanism

Daily Clicks
Monday, January 31, 2011
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Aerial view of tree farm (Gerco de Ruijter via BldgBlog)

Aerial view of tree farm (Gerco de Ruijter via BldgBlog)

Synthetic Forests. BldgBlog uncovered a series of aerial photos of Dutch tree farms by artist Gerco de Ruijter. Called Baumschule, the pristine man-made geometry overlaid  upon nature is really quite stunning.

Saving Robin Hood. One of the first brutalist buildings in London by the Smithsons could be saved from demolition and converted into modern family townhomes. BD Online reports that a proposal by Sarah Wigglesworth Architects plans new units on the roof.

Completing Indy. A proposed “complete streets” bill for the Indiana Department of Transportation is currently being considered that would require a multimodal approach to transportation design and could be a be a coup for pedestrians and cyclists. Urban Indy has the details, including a potential loophole.

Urban Playoffs. There’s an ideological battle fermenting between the forces behind New Urbanism and newcomer Landscape Urbanism. The Boston Globe details the differences between the two and the latest on the battle of the urban minds.

Quick Clicks> He′s Back, Pay Up, On Fire, Sale!

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Friday, January 28, 2011
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Rahm Emanuel is on track for election. (Courtesy chicagoforrahm.com)

Rahm Emanuel is on track for election. (Courtesy chicagoforrahm.com)

On Track. The mayor of Chicago holds sway in a big way. That’s why we’re keeping an eye on the ballot, and, as of today, Rahm Emanuel is back in business, reports The Chicago Tribune. Emanuel has stated that one of his first priorities is to expand Chicago Transportation Authority’s Red Line.

Street price. Speaking of getting around town, a new coalition called the Sustainable Transportation Campaign is reviving the idea of congestion pricing for New York City, reports Andrea Bernstein at Transportation Nation.

Change of Hearth. Curling up by a roaring fire sounds idyllic on a snowy day, but do the realities of a fireplace outweigh the romance? We’re still debating the subject following this piece in The New York Times.

Bookmark it. MoMA’s Design Store book sale is in full swing, says Curbed NY. Architecture and design classics and new releases over 50% off! Visit the stores in New York or online.

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Metal Flower Blossoms In Downtown LA

West
Friday, January 28, 2011
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From our friends at Culver City Patch we’ve found a video about David and Brian Hurley, a father-son welding team called Aero Welding that helped put together LA design firm Electroland’s new Metallotus. It’s a 30-foot-long, 1,400 pound stainless steel lotus flower  suspended 30 feet above the courtyard of the Medallion project in Downtown LA. The lotus (a symbol of downtown’s rebirth), supported by several steel cables, changes color and intensity at night thanks to programmed LED lights in the corners of the courtyard. It’s nice to see the sweat equity that goes into this kind of work. It took the Hurleys a number of weeks to complete the project—a combination of stainless steel tubes and stainless steel mesh— achieving details, curvatures, and joints that Electroland principal Cameron McNall describes as “beautiful.”  Read More

Condo Cluster at the Cloisters?

East, East Coast
Thursday, January 27, 2011
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Four proposed residential towers near The Cloisters in Northern Manhattan could transform the uptown skyline. (Courtesy Quadriad)

Four proposed residential towers near The Cloisters in Northern Manhattan could transform the uptown skyline. (Courtesy Quadriad)

Quadriad Reality is in negotiations to acquire land at Broadway and 190th Street in order to build four towers ranging from 22 to 44 stories. If the proposals go forward they could represent the one of the largest residential developments above 155th Street in more than a generation.

Read more after the jump.

World Trade Weekly: White Out Edition

East, East Coast
Wednesday, January 26, 2011
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[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, AN stops by the massive construction site for a weekly update, nevermind the weather! ]

This week, through a haze of snow, we got a glimpse of the last bits of the former Deutsche Bank building. Shrouded behind a fence covered in blue nylon, the once 41-story tower is the last remaining physical remnant of 9/11 to be cleared away piece by piece.

With visibility low, the sounds of the site take over.  From this vantage, the groaning sound of metal being bent and twisted distinguishes itself from sounds of construction, the swirl of cement inside mixers, the hum of truck engines, and the rhythmic clang of metal banging on metal.

More construction photos after the jump.

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