One Word: Plastics

East
Tuesday, May 3, 2011
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Plastics was the key word at the recent Columbia conference “Permanent Change: Plastics in Architecture and Engineering,” which featured some of the best architects working with polymers today. On opening night, Greg Lynn did away with traditional tectonics in favor of total composite design from recycled toys to beautiful racing boats. Several pieces were on display in the lobby, including a beautiful backlit ribbed column cover designed by Columbia associate professor Yoshiko Sato (assisted by Shuning Zhao and John Hooper). Sato, who’s known for her NASA design research and space course at Columbia, also designed the two over-sized plastic inflatable flowers suspended from the lobby ceiling, as shown above. The composite designs will be up and on view at the Morningside Heights campus at least another week.

 

 

McGuigan Tapped to Lead Arch Record

 

Cathleen McGuigan (Courtesy Architectural Record)

For a 120-year-old magazine, Architectural Record went impressively new-fangled in announcing its new editor-in-chief, Cathleen McGuigan, with word leaking out on Facebook Monday followed by rounds of Twitter and a formal blog posting at the Arc Rec website this morning.

Read More

Giveaway! Win Tickets to the Chicago Architecture & Design Film Festival

Midwest
Tuesday, May 3, 2011
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The first annual Chicago Architecture & Design Film Festival is almost here. With 39 films ranging from shorts to feature length as well as panel discussions, Q&A’s, and related events, there will be so much for architects and the general public to see and enjoy.

The Architect’s Newspaper is proud to be a media sponsor, and I’ll be introducing the program called “Renegade Redux,” featuring a film on architecture collective Ant Farm, and shorts on a giant brink warehouse in Liverpool and overlooked corners of London.

The festival runs from May 5 through May 9, and we have a couple of pairs of tickets to give away. Just  leave a comment below by noon CST and we’ll randomly select two lucky winners who will each get a pair of free tickets!

Most screenings will be held at the Gene Siskel Film Center, located at 146 North State Street. Some additional screenings will be held at SCREEN@theWit, located at the Wit Hotel, 201 North State Street. We’ll contact the winners via e.mail (Don’t worry, we won’t share your e.mail address). So leave a comment for complimentary tickets now.

QUICK CLICKS>Lost Library, Bad Planning, Homey, Pricey Park

Daily Clicks
Monday, May 2, 2011
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The old Lenox Library designed by Richard Morris Hunt.

Flummoxed Lenox. Inspired by a Gothamist post about hidden rooms in the Frick, Mark Lamster digs a bit deeper and shares his knowledge of the site when it was occupied by the old Lenox Library. “…sober, imposing, and correct, much like the man who designed it, Richard Morris Hunt,” he says of the old edifice, before delving into the curious history of the Hunt memorial across the street.

Boulevard Blues. Brownstoner is still hammering away at a bleak streetscape along 4th Avenue in Brooklyn, where first floors of the new residential buildings leave a lot to be desired. The site reports that City Planning may be looking at measures to fix mistakes from 2003 upzoning and bring more life onto the street. While they’re at it, perhaps they can tap the DOT to add some green to the median.

House vs. Home. A kinder and gentler Peter Eisenman emerged from nearly 20 years of Jungian analysis, the architect tells The Washington Post. Far from the heady world of theory (“I was a cerebral cat”), Eisenman returns to the world of bricks and mortar. The change helps him expound on the differences between a house and home.

Tick Tock. The clock is ticking for the Brooklyn Bridge Park to make a decision on how to pay for maintaining the park, reports Crains. “If we don’t have a financial model, we won’t be able to proceed with construction,” BBP President Regina Myer tells the paper.

Live at the World Trade Center

East, Newsletter
Monday, May 2, 2011
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Media crush at One World Trade. AN/Stoelker

With our office just two blocks up from Ground Zero, we are feeling the exhilaration and pride right up to our 5th floor windows.  And when we saw NBC’s Matt Lauer at the corner Starbucks preparing for a ‘live from’ segment, we didn’t hesitate to buttonhole the guy and give him our latest timely issue—online today!—featuring a complete rundown on the Memorial Museum, along with some first views of the underground construction site that is taking shape as a museum as large as almost any in the city—with the potency of history.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> London Calling, Dumbo Nuptials, Eco-Edgy, Odd Couple

Daily Clicks
Friday, April 29, 2011
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The new American embassy in London by Philly-based KieranTimberlak sets the standard. (Courtesy Bureau of Overseas Buildings)

London Calling. The State Department is pushing for design excellence standards and is using its new embassy in London as a prototype.  The  embassy, designed by Philly-based KieranTimberlake, is still in its early phases, but as the project evolves, so will the standards for future buildings commissioned by the Bureau of Overseas Buildings, reports Engineering News-Record. While haute design remains part of the goal, sustainability and efficiency will take the fore. (Via Arch Record.)

New York Answering. The call from London that many answered Friday morning came from Westminster Abbey. Of the more auspicious outcomes, the  so-called “Little Britain” section in the Village got it’s nickname sanctified by The Times. Off the beaten path, under a bridge really, Brownstoner reports that an early morning crowd beneath the Manhattan Bridge gathered for a live video feed.

U2 in Malibu. Well not the whole group, just The Edge. He got approval from the Santa Monica Mountain Conservancy to build five eco-friendly homes in the Hollywood Hills. The dirty little tid-bit revealed in the LA Times is that the conservancy group accepted about $1 million in payments and services provided by a consultant hired by Mr. Edge. (via Curbed LA)

Jane and Andy. Two names you might never consider putting together are Jane Jacons and Andy Warhol. But an essay by Timothy Mennel pairs to the “two libertarians” together in this week’s Design Observer. Besides both coming from Pennsylvania steel towns, Mennel shows how their respective notions of community shaped the city as we know it today: eyes on your street vs. eyes on your navel.

Roche Unleashes On SCI-Arc

Dean's List, Newsletter, West
Friday, April 29, 2011
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From Roche's Isobiot®ope at the Venice Bienale

Architect-researcher-conceptual designer-provocateur Francois Roche was recently invited to give a lecture and exhibition at SCI-Arc relating to the work of his firm R&Sie(n). However he canceled both, revealing the reasons in an open letter, after the jump. Much of it is in self-described  “Frenchglish,” but you get the idea.

He’s not so happy with what he characterizes as the school’s arrogance, its narrow focus on design, and its “lack of interest for politics and attitude.”  Them’s fightin’ words… Meanwhile SCI-Arc spokesperson Georgiana Ceausu tells AN that Roche’s summer exhibit didn’t work out because he wanted to display something he had already shown, which is against school policy.

Reach Roche’s scathing letter after the jump.

Wilson Savastano Venezia′s Dukhan facade: TAKTL

Fabrikator
Friday, April 29, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by: 

Prototype of a perforated Dukhan facade panel (TAKTL)

High-performance concrete creates new possibilities for a community college facade.

A new generation of concrete, called Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC), is changing the way architects and designers think about the material. Usually composed of cement, fine grain sand, silica fume, optimized admixture, and alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforcement, UHPC offers high ductility, strength, and durability with a fine surface appearance. A new UHPC product called TAKTL, launched last year, shows the many additional applications that are possible with the right material mix, including facade panels available through its sister company VECTR. Recently chosen by Milan-based Wilson Savastano Venezia Architecture Studio for its Dukhan Community College (DCC) project in Qatar, the company is in the research and development phase for perforated and solid panels to clad the school’s sculptural facade.
Continue reading after the jump.

QUICK CLICKS> Splitsville, Sprawling, Lab Lead, Bird Brains

Daily Clicks
Thursday, April 28, 2011
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FOA partners in more collaborative times. Valerie Bennett/National Portrait Gallery, London, 2002.

FOA partners in more collaborative times. (Valerie Bennett/National Portrait Gallery, London, 2002)

No Joint Custody. Archinect reports that partners Farshid Moussavi and Alejandro Zaera-Polo of London-based Foreign Office Architects (FOA) have made their professional divorce official. According to a press statement, each partner will now head up his/her own office and all staff will be retained and assigned to one of the two.

Urban Fuel. University of Quebec researchers have published a study showing that higher gas prices translate into–logically–less urban sprawl: “On average, a 1% increase in gas prices has caused: i) a .32% increase in the population living in the inner city and ii) a 1.28% decrease in low-density housing units.” Read more at Infrastructurist.

Lab Experiment. The New York Times profiles the new director of MIT’s Media Lab, Joichi “Joi” Ito, a 44-year-old venture capitalist from Japan, who comes to the job with a wealth of experience but no academic credentials. But “He has credibility in an academic context,” Lawrence Lessig, Harvard Law prof and Creative Commons founder, told the Times. “We’ve been collaborators, and I’ve stolen many ideas from him and turned them into my own.”

Big Bird Brains? Are pigeons just playing dumb for crumbs and sympathy? As far as birds go, city-dwelling pigeons have proportionally bigger brains than their avian country cousins, writes Per Square Mile.

 

Burple Bup Pavilion sets its sights on Governor′s Island

East
Thursday, April 28, 2011
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Bittertang's "Burple Bup" wins City of Dreams Pavilion Competition

Bittertang's "Burple Bup" wins City of Dreams Pavilion Competition

Coming this summer to a Governor’s Island near you (as long as you’re in New York), the Burple Bup pavilion will fuse natural and synthetic materials to create a sustainable refuge from the sun. Composed of layered earthen strands winding sinuously beneath a translucent floating dome. Designed by Bittertang, the temporary shelter will provide a quiet meditative and social space on the island beginning May 27.

Continue reading after the jump.

We Heart Architectural Salvage

East, West
Thursday, April 28, 2011
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Vintage glass chandelier from Southern California Architectural Salvage.

Our friends at Echo Park Patch today report on one of the coolest places in Los Angeles: Southern California Architectural Salvage (formerly Santa Fe Wrecking). Located in a large warehouse in downtown LA, it’s a great place to find architectural oddities like towering teak gates from Argentina, claw-foot bathtubs, iron gates, chandeliers, or vintage doors, sinks, and toilets.

The list is pretty extensive, and the only criterion: “It has to be different from what you get at Home Depot,” says owner Jerry Hernandez. Among our other favorite salvaging spots are Silver Lake Architectural Salvage, which recently moved to Pasadena, CA, the ReBuilding Center on Portland, Oregon’s Mississippi Avenue, and the Demolition Depot in New York.

Share your favorite salvaging hot spots in the comments below and check out a few salvage photos after the jump.

More after the jump.

Pictorial> Soumaya Museum by Fernando Romero

International
Thursday, April 28, 2011
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Soumaya Museum (Courtsey Adam Wiseman)

Soumaya Museum (Courtsey Adam Wiseman)

Mexico City’s new Museo Soumaya (named after the deceased wife of Carlos Slim, the Mexican billionaire who owns the museum) was finally unveiled to the public late last month. The museum houses 60,000-square-feet of continuous exhibition space spread over six levels and containing over 6,200 pieces from Slim’s art collection.

Designed by Fernando Romero of the firm FREE, the building is shaped like a woman’s bustier with a cinched waist. The amorphous structure is built with 28 curved steel columns of varying diameters, each with its own contoured geometry. While the exterior mass resembles a singular object, the skin is comprised of thousands of hexagonal aluminum modules.

While the building itself is almost opaque–it has no windows–the roof of the top floor is suspended from a cantilever, letting in natural light. The result is a monumental parametric design offering a dramatic sculptural addition to the city once celebrated for its tradition and hand-painted, colorful architecture.

Check out a photo gallery after the jump.

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