Stop, Collaborate & Lexington: Studio Gang Reveals New Plans for Stalled Kentucky Site

Midwest, Newsletter
Thursday, July 14, 2011
.
Studio Gang's design for a 30-story tower in Lexington, Kentucky (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Studio Gang's design for a 30-story tower in Lexington, Kentucky (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Developer Dudley Webb of the Webb Companies didn’t make any friends when his company razed an entire block of Downtown Lexington, Kentucky for a massive mixed-use tower that ended up stalling in the recession. Now, though, after bringing on Chicago-based Studio Gang to help reimagine the project at the behest of Lexington Mayor Jim Gray and dean of the University of Kentucky College of Design Michael Speaks, the community is regaining excitement over new plans to revamp the CentrePointe site.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Dinosaurs Are Coming To LA!

West
Thursday, July 14, 2011
.

This Saturday the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County will unveil Dinosaur Hall, a 14,000 square-foot permanent dinosaur exhibit featuring 20 dinosaur skeletons and over 300 fossils, as well as interactive displays and informative excavation videos. The majority of the prehistoric bones are real, giving viewers an authentic glimpse into the world 65 million years ago.

With its footprint unchanged, the museum was rejiggered to accommodate the super-sized Hall. The new exhibit boasts two, two-story galleries that are conjoined into a mesmerizing display of jumbo-sized specimens that visitors can walk under, around and even come face-to-face with. Designed by CO Architects in collaboration with exhibition design firm Evidence Design, the new dinosaur digs encompass the museum’s original, recently restored, 1913 Beaux Arts structure and its 1920s addition which has been outfitted with floor-to-ceiling windows.

Read More

Filed Under: , ,

Quick Clicks> Empty Spaces, Town & Country, Big Box Redux, and Taxing Gas

Daily Clicks
Thursday, July 14, 2011
.

Aerial view of Malmberget, Sweden (Polis, Tomma Rum)

Empty Spaces. Searching for a place to exhibit her work as an art student in 2003, an artist from the rural mining town Malmberget, Sweden, organized a program titled Tomma Rum (Empty Spaces) that converts empty lots into artist studios and gallery spaces. As described in an interview with Polis, the program has morphed into a traveling summer artist-in-residence, where global artists have displayed their pieces on fences to streets in various towns.

Town and Country. Is city life or country life better for your health? The Wall Street Journal reports on the ongoing debate between the quality of life in urban versus rural areas. Each have their benefits and drawbacks. Studies indicate that in urban areas, there are less obese children but also higher crime rates. In the country, there are larger numbers of fatal driving accidents but lower incidences of allergies.

Big Box Redux. In Seattle, empty malls are attracting new tenants. A fitness center owner is converting empty mall space into a new climbing gym, while grocery stores such as Whole Foods and Trader Joes, and sporting goods stores such as Sports Authority are taking over retail vacancies, The Seattle Times reports.

Taxing Gas. A study conducted by the multi-partisan Leadership Initiative on Transportation Solvency, part of the Carnegie Foundation for International Peace, may have found a better way to increase funds for transportation infrastructure through a more effective gas tax system. In their report, DC Streets Blog highlights, that taxing gas when the price lowers and a more efficient program with a focus on design with economic performance are key.

WTC Update: Venting

East
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
.

The vertical vents on the south face Maki's 4 World Trade.

It’s been several weeks since our last visit to the World Trade Center site. On our return today we were taken with the manner in which different architects handle ventilation at the site. The most obvious example are the two large vent structures that protrude from the west side of the Memorial Plaza. The concrete buildings are a necessary solution to a complicated infrastructure problem.  Davis Brody Bond (now Aedas) designed a mesh mask for the concrete structures and workers were putting the finishing touches on south building today.

more photos after the jump

QUICK CLICKS> Bike Lite, Convenient Cities, London Smog, Choco-design

Daily Clicks
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
.

Bike Lights (Project Aura Blog, by Ethan Frier and Jonathan Ota)

Safer at night. Two design students at Carnegie Mellon University created a functional and graceful lighting system for bikers that enhances side visibility at night.  The LED lights that line the wheel rims, are powered by pedaling and change colors depending on speed. Bloggers at Greater Greater Washington have posted a video of the lights in action.

Convenient Cities. What makes a city “convenient”? According to a study published by The Street, factors include walkability, public transportation, and amenity proximity.  Their city ranking, using data from Walk Score, Zillow and APTA, put Boston, New York, Denver, Portland, and Chicago at the top.

Olympic Pollution. A documentary by filmmaker Faisal Abdu’Allah, Double Pendulum, examines the harmful effects of pollution on East London residents and athletes, The Guardian says. Abdu’Allah cautions that poor air quality in East London may threaten athletes’ performances in the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Designer Chocolates. PSFK reports that researchers in a joint program between the University of Exeter, the University of Brunel, and Delam, a software developer, have created a printer that turns 3D CAD designs into ready-made chocolates. An upcoming retail site will allow the public to upload original designs.

EVENT> “History of Design” Author Talk: Thursday, July 14

East
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
.

Co-authors Jeff Byles and Anne Ferebee will spotlight NYC in talk on "A History of Design," July 14.

Thursday, July 14 (tomorrow!)

12:00pm

92YTribeca MAINSTAGE

200 Hudson Street

Anne Ferebee and Architect’s Newspaper alum Jeff Byles discuss their new book A History of Design from the Victorian Era to the Present (W.W. Norton, 2nd ed), turning a  spotlight on New York City as a “roiling epicenter of modern design innovation, with a focus on architecture and urbanism stretching from that Victorian-era paragon of poetry in stone and steel—the Brooklyn Bridge—to Mies van der Rohe’s sublime corporate style and a new generation’s minimalist marvels on the Bowery.” (Not since e.e. cummings has NYC sounded so good!)

Tickets $16, purchase online at www.92Y.org.

 

Held Up: Stalled Projects at CRA/LA

West
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
.

Improvements to the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center are now on hold pending resolution of the CRA/LA's status.

On Monday we reported that redevelopment agencies around the state have had to put the brakes on upcoming projects until their uncertain futures are sorted out. Because of recent state legislation cities will have to pay their share of $1.7 billion by this fall in order to preserve their respective agencies. Here’s a good example of the impact. CRA/LA has provided us a list of more than 20 current projects put on hold since the passage of the new legislation. They include the following:

Check out the list after the jump.

NEA Our Town Grants Could Spur a New Economy

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, July 12, 2011
.
MOS Architects-designed arts Drive-In in Marfa, Texas. (Courtesy NEA)

MOS Architects-designed arts Drive-In in Marfa, Texas. (Courtesy NEA)

Rocco Landesman, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), believes that art can play a major role in improving the economy and our quality of life. A new program of grants called Our Town seeks to spur such economic and civic development by investing more than $6.5 million in 51 projects covering 34 states.

Landesman said the goal is to foster creative placemaking through public space design, cultural planning, festivals, public art, and more. “Creative placemaking is a strategy for making places vibrant,” said Jason Schupbach, the NEA’s Director of Design. “Arts and design are essential parts of the complex work of building a livable, sustainable community.”

Check out the winners after the jump.

On View> 194X–9/11: American Architects and the City

East
Tuesday, July 12, 2011
.
Mies van der Rohe's Museum for a Small City Project, 1942 (Courtesy MoMA)

Mies van der Rohe's Museum for a Small City Project, 1942 (Courtesy MoMA)

194X–9/11: American Architects and the City
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd St.
Through January 2

Prompted by the United States’ entrance into World War II in 1942, Architectural Forum magazine commissioned pioneering architects to imagine and plan a postwar American city. At the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, 194X-9/11: American Architects and the City features the plans, renderings, and sculpture of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn, Paul Rudolph, and Rem Koolhaas and their ideas for cities of the future. Rarely displayed works, such as Mies van der Rohe’s collage Museum for a Small City Project (1942), above, reveal plans for cultural centers and urban life in uncertain times.

Dude! Behold The Skate House

International, Newsletter, West
Monday, July 11, 2011
.

Skateboarders, commence drooling. Behold this prototype for the PAS House, a Malibu home in which every surface will be skate-able. The secret? There will be no corners. From the living room to the kitchen to the bedroom the ground becomes the wall and then the ceiling in a continuous surface forming a tube with a 10 foot radius. The furniture is also curved for skating, including some groovy looking tables and beds.

The project, located at the top of Las Flores Canyon in Malibu, will by sometime next year be the home of skateboarder Pierre Andre Senizergues (hence the name PAS), a former world champion skater, and owner of skateboard company Sole Technology. It’s being created by designer Gil Lebon Delapointe and LA architect Francois Perrin, who for the prototype of the living area bent plywood, previously soaked in water, using a traditional skateboard ramp fabrication technique.

Skate on after the ollie…

On View> The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis

East
Monday, July 11, 2011
.
(COURTESY MCNY)

(COURTESY MCNY)

The American Style:
Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis
Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue
Through October 30

Following the U.S. Centennial of 1876, architecture in New York City was defined by what was known as “the American style,” a visual language referencing both the nation’s nostalgia for its beginnings and its progressive aspirations. A new exhibition reveals the impact of Colonial Revival on the cityscape through vintage photographs and objects like a 1926 mahogany settee by the Company of Master Craftsmen, whose volutes reflect a resurgence in classicism that is the trademark of the Colonial.

More images after the jump.

On View> Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977

East
Monday, July 11, 2011
.
(COURTESY DIA: BEACON)

(COURTESY DIA: BEACON)

Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977
Dia: Beacon/CCS Bard
3 Beekman Street/18 West 86th St.
Beacon, NY/New York, NY

Though October 31

Dia: Beacon and the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies have co-organized a comprehensive exhibition of the post-war German artist Blinky Palermo. Palermo’s works on paper (1963–1973) are on view at Bard, while his Metal Pictures and later works (1973–1977) are displayed in Dia: Beacon’s expansive galleries. A student of Joseph Beuys, Palermo’s work dealt with the relationship of color and space, and in Europe he gained notice for his abstract large-scale murals. Inspired by a trip to America in the early ‘70s, Palermo created the To the People of New York series, above, based on the colors of the East German and West German flags.

Another painting after the jump.

Page 319 of 458« First...102030...317318319320321...330340350...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License