Cooper Union Showcases Student Innovation

Dean's List, East
Tuesday, May 31, 2011
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Maxwell von Stein's Flywheel Bicycle (Courtesy Cooper Union)

Maxwell von Stein's Flywheel Bicycle (Courtesy Cooper Union)

It’s that time of year again: School is giving way to summer vacation, final reviews are winding down, and the life of the architecture student regains some semblance of normalcy. The Cooper Union celebrates this time of year with its traditional End of Year Show, highlighting the work of students in art, architecture, and engineering. Hundreds of projects are now on display at the school’s Foundation Building at 7 East 7th Street on Cooper Square.

The engineering show just wrapped up, but the architecture showcase runs through June 18 and the art school’s work will be on display through June 11. The exhibition is free and open Tuesday through Saturday from noon until 7:00 p.m..  Take a look at a few of the student projects after the jump.

Check out the projects after the jump.

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QUICK CLICKS> Altophobia, Old Archphobia, Parkphobia, Sunset

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, May 31, 2011
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Scared of heights? Courtesy NYTimes/Rothstein

High up. The New York TimesEdward Rothstein went out on a ledge for the paper today. The critic took on the glass boxes that protrude from the Willis Tower in Chicago known appropriately as the Ledge. The critic waxes poetic about the vulnerability of the city and the fully human sensations that occur when floating some 1,353 feet above the street. He also takes the opportunity to point out the redundancy of the Ledge’s cousin, the Grand Canyon Skywalk.

Tear Down. Christopher Hawthorne balked at SFMOMA‘s public relations campaign to portray the museum’s new Snøhetta-designed wing as a wallflower respecting its Mario Botta-designed neighbor. But as Hawthorne points out in the LA Times, the new building is anything but quiet. Rather it’s more a “chiseled behemoth.”  Hawthorne finds the museum’s affront to its Botta as part of a larger trend in the American museum world where the tendency is to drop good, but alas, old architecture in lieu of ever newer names and trends. Read: Whitney, MoMA, Barnes, to name but a few.

Put a Lid on It. In a totally biased and unabashedly opinionated piece for City Watch, Jack Humphreville writes that a back room deal may have LA ratepayers of the Department of Water and Power footing the bill for a new twelve-acre park designed to cap the underground reservoir replacing the Elysian Reservoir. Humprhies argues that the $85 million park should fall under the auspices of the City and the Department of Recreation and Parks.

Manhattanhenge. Gothamist reminds us that tonight at 8:17PM the full sun will set in perfect alignment with east west axis of Manhattan’s street grid. Remember not to stare, mesmerized, for too long.

 

 

 

WTC Update> Memorial Day Edition

East
Friday, May 27, 2011
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Sailors in town for Fleet Week at the World Trade Center site today. (AN/Stoelker)

One World Trade has had a good week. Condé Nast officially signed on the dotted line yesterday. Several of the interested parties from the Port Authority to Cushman Wakefield took out two full page ads in The New York Times congratulating themselves on a job well done. But back at the site, something slightly less tangible occurred. It’s purely subjective of course, but over the last week it seems that One World Trade finally reached the “wow” factor. There’s no getting around it anymore, the building is huge. Of course, throughout the site there’s plenty more to see…

Read More

Video> Moving Beyond a Gas-Powered World

International
Friday, May 27, 2011
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A gas-powered shaving device. (Still from video)

A gas-powered shaving device. (Still from video)

French automaker Renault has launched a new line of electric cars, their Z.E. line, and as part of its marketing promotions asks why we’re still using gas to power autos if we don’t for other everyday objects. Imagine a world where all your electric gadgets released a steady stream of exhaust. The result is surreal and at times hilarious. Take a look for yourself after the jump. (Via PSFK.)

Watch the video after the jump.

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Back and Forth gets Bitter at Trump Soho

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Friday, May 27, 2011
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Trump Soho Tower in Manhattan. (Several Seconds/Flickr)

Trump Soho Tower in Manhattan. (Several Seconds/Flickr)

There’s a tempest brewing at the Trump Soho, which isn’t towering quite so high over Manhattan these days. The Real Deal reported this week that developers behind the luxury hotel-residence, Bayrock/Sapir, have filed a lawsuit against the building’s architects, the Rockwell Group. Among the allegations are too-small bathtubs and closets that can’t fit hangers. But the fight started much earlier with a complaint from the architect.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Modernism Retires

International
Friday, May 27, 2011
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Modernism Reaches Retirement Age (Fueled by Coffee via Core 77)

Modernism Reaches Retirement Age (Fueled by Coffee via Core 77)

We spotted this amazing cartoon by fueledbycoffee over at Core 77 this week and think it’s pretty amazing. Don’t miss the rest of the cartoon over at Core77 showing adaptations of Noguchi and Nelson. We’ll be out on Monday, but right back in the game come Tuesday morning. Have a great Memorial Day weekend!

Video> Venice in Venice

International
Friday, May 27, 2011
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"Untitled" by Nan Goldin

The Venice architecture biennale is still over a year away but the longer running art biennale will open next week. If you are of the architecture bent there is always a great deal to see and visit at the art biennale. Here is a sampling including images from Real Venice: International Artists help to Save Venice in the abbey of  San Giorgio Maggiore to remind you just how special is la Serrininisma. But perhaps the most exciting exhibit at this years biennale is Venice in Venice organized and curated by the irrepressible Jacqueline Miro and Tim Nye (with help from Tibby Rothman) about our Venice! If you are not making it to the Venice Biennale, here are some images to savor!

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ExpoTENtial Innovates Manhattan City Life

Dean's List, East
Friday, May 27, 2011
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ExpoTENtial's Par Corps Lab at the Center for Architecture closes tomorrow.

The month of May saw three ExpoTENtial labs open around Manhattan. Curated by Laetitia Wolff/futureflair, the multi-dimensional platform/festival delves seeks insights on how design can help innovate city living. Addressing everything from urban composting with worms, to using the everyday streetscape for exercise through parcours, Wolff and team stirred up traditional notions of living in NYC by encouraging visitors to think “off the grid.”  In the Par Corps Lab, the crew uses video collage to ponders the manner in which design can promote physical activity and social interaction. Multipurpose bike racks anyone? Today and tomorrow will be the last chance to check it out at the Center for Architecture. Wolff is currently attempting to raise funds for the next seven labs.

Continue reading after the jump.

Galloping Gallatin: NYU Exhibition is Out There

Dean's List, East
Friday, May 27, 2011
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The exhibit "Global Design: Elsewhere Envisioned" at NYU's Gallatin through June 25. (Julie Iovine/AN)

The exhibit "Global Design: Elsewhere Envisioned" at NYU's Gallatin through June 25. (Julie Iovine/AN)

It happened suddenly, as if out of nowhere: NYU’s Gallatin opened Global Design/Elsewhere Envisioned, an exhibition that comes with two symposia, is described as an initiative, and some hope might just morph into a new school of architecture.

Continue reading after the jump.

SmithGroup′s ASU Facade: Kovach

Fabrikator
Friday, May 27, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by: 

The facade includes six copper panel types (Liam Frederick)

Articulated copper clads gateway building to new College of Nursing in Phoenix

Copper has certain attributes that make it an appealing facade option in arid climates. The first is that it doesn’t turn green. “Here in the desert, it weathers like a penny in your pocket,” said Mark Kranz, the SmithGroup Phoenix design principal in charge of the recently completed Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation Phase II project. Clad in an articulated and partially perforated copper skin, the 84,000-square-foot, five-story facility complements a collection of existing and new buildings that form the college’s new Phoenix campus. This month, the project won a 2011 North American Copper in Architecture Award, earning points not only for the identity it imparts to the campus, but also for a unique panel design that delivers environmental performance at a low cost.

Continue reading after the jump.

Documentary Celebrates Burnished Bungalows

East
Thursday, May 26, 2011
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Beach-side bungalows are the stars of the documentary. (Courtesy Bungalows of the Rockaways)

With summer weather quickly approaching, it’s the perfect time to kick back and dream about a sweet bungalow by the beach… in Queens. Endangered bungalows throughout New York City have been on the radar for some time now, but documentary filmmaker Jennifer Callahan has focused on the fight to preserve the few bungalows left on the Rockaway Peninsula in her film Bungalows of the Rockaways, which will be screened tonight at Tenement Talks at the Tenement Museum.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Capping Highways, Flying Meteors, Infrastructure Pop, Old School Ivy

Daily Clicks
Thursday, May 26, 2011
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Proposed highway-straddling structure in Santa Monica. (Courtesy Curbed)

Proposed highway-straddling structure in Santa Monica. (Courtesy Curbed)

Capping Santa Monica. Curbed LA got some great renderings from students at USC who where charged with imagining even more highway caps for the Pacific Coast Highway, this time from Arizona to California Avenues. Beyond freeway parks, the students proposed housing, hotels, and community centers.

Breaking Whitney. With the deal signed for the Met to take over the Whitney‘s Breuer building on Madison, directors at the ground breaking for the new branch at the High Line had all the more reason to celebrate. DNA reminds readers that the museum is actually retuning home. Ol’ Gerty got the ball rolling on 8th Street way back in 1930.

Dylan Sings. Happy B-day Bobby! Bob Dylan turned 70 on Tuesday and in celebration the Infrastructurist presents Dylan’s Ten Best Infrastructure Songs, including “The Levee’s Gonna Break” and “Marchin’ to the City.”

Old School. Design New Haven has the Robert A.M. Stern drawings for “street calming measures” at Yale that are part of the $600 million for renovations, including two new residential colleges. The plan includes mixed use buildings intended to encourage street life at all hours and improved access to the Farmington Canal Greenway .

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