With One Art Barn Down, Plans At Another Texas University Alarm Preservationists

UT Dallas Art Barn (Courtesy of Mark Lamster)

UT Dallas Art Barn. (Courtesy Mark Lamster)

It’s a bad year to be an Art Barn. Only two weeks after Rice University demolished its beloved structure, UT Dallas announced plans to close down its own Art Barn, with its exact fate remaining unclear. Architecture critic Mark Lamster, among others, voiced speculation over the building’s shutdown and possible removal from UT Dallas’ campus.

Continue reading after the jump.

“Urban Ballet” of Reclaimed Chairs Comes to Times Square This Weekend

Art, City Terrain, East, Urbanism
Friday, May 16, 2014
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Chairs like these will be on display in Times Square. (Courtesy

Chairs like these will be on display in Times Square. (Courtesy

This weekend, design firm Bade Stageberg Cox will transform Times Square with the help of nearly 50 reclaimed chairs painted taxicab yellow. The chairs will be arranged like theater seats and Times Square will be the stage. “As the plaza is occupied throughout the day, the chairs’ movement and rearrangement becomes a performance about the ways in which people inhabit the public realm and shape it to suit their needs,” said the firm in a statement. The installation is part of their Street Theater series, and coincides with New York City Design Week.

Small Projects Awards honor big things in small packages

Woodland Dune Home (Steve Hall, Hedrich Blessing)

Woodland Dune Home (Steve Hall, Hedrich Blessing)

Big projects command the most media attention, but small works of art and architecture can still make a splash. That’s the ethos of AIA Chicago’s fourth annual Small Projects Awards, which last week named 13 honorees among 96 entries that included Chinatown’s new boathouse, a barn-like complement to Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth house, and an un-built “Safe House” for tornado-ravaged Joplin, Missouri. Read More

Curated or Crowd-Sourced? MoMA Taps into the Vox Pop via Kickstarter

East, Product
Friday, May 16, 2014
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Projecteo. Backed by 2,789 project supporters on Kickstarter. (Courtesy Kickstarter)

Projecteo. Backed by 2,789 project supporters on Kickstarter. (Courtesy Kickstarter)

Move over, Aalto vases and Eames coat racks: there are some fresh new works  available at the Museum of Modern Art Design Store. Sourced in partnership with Kickstarter, 24 products from 20 international designers are getting a shot at icon status over the course of four short weeks.

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Obit> Dr. Alan Friedman, 1942-2014

East, Obit
Friday, May 16, 2014
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Aerial view of the NY Hall of Science Playground, completed in 2007. (Jeff Goldberg/Esto)

Aerial view of the NY Hall of Science Playground, completed in 2007. (Jeff Goldberg/Esto)

We love all of our clients equally… but Dr. Alan Friedman we really, really loved. We should all be so fortunate as to work with someone as generous, curious, optimistic yet not unrealistic, trusting, and somehow always fun.

BKSK worked with him on two ambitious permanent outdoor exhibits (collectively the NY Hall of Science Playground) approximately ten years apart, and in between were tapped for various smaller tasks. So lightning, for us, struck more than once. The beginning of any project was, following that metaphor, electrifying.

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Prefabricated Glamping Tents by ArchiWorkshop

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Fabrikator
ArchiWorkshop's semi-permanent glamping structures reimagine the conventional platform tent. (Courtesy ArchiWorkshop)

ArchiWorkshop’s semi-permanent glamping structures re-imagine the conventional platform tent. (Courtesy ArchiWorkshop)

Dynamic steel and PVDF structures shelter campers in style.

In South Korea, glamping—or “glamorous camping”—is all the rage. The practice combines conventional camping’s affinity for the outdoors with hotel amenities, including comfortable bedding and fine food. Seoul firm ArchiWorkshop’s prefabricated, semi-permanent glamping structures are a design-minded twist on the traditional platform tent. “We [set out to] create a glamping [tent] that gives people a chance to experience nature very close, while also providing a uniquely designed architectural experience,” said partner Hee Jun Sim. “There are many glamping sites in Korea, but they’re actually not so high-end. We were able to bring up the level of glamping in Korea.” Read More

On View> Exhibit in Tribeca Brings Back the 20th Century Suburb (Extended!)

East, On View
Thursday, May 15, 2014
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A Best store by James Wines. (Courtesy James Wines)

A Best store by James Wines. (Courtesy James Wines)

Its hard to drive past a Target roadside box today without remembering James Wines/SITE Architects’ magical 1970′s Best Store projects—and everything they revealed about consumerism in America. These designs are also remembered for their formal invention and early support of environmental thinking, but Carriage Trade, the tiny but always smart art gallery on Tribeca’s Walker Street, reminds us in their exhibit, Cutting Through the Suburbs, how radical they were at the time of their design.

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Bittertang Farms sculpts hay into a North Shore theater for 102nd Ragdale Ring competition

The 2014 Ragdale Ring Design is scheduled for a public unveiling on June 14. (The Bittertang Farm)

The 2014 Ragdale Ring Design is scheduled for a public unveiling on June 14. (Courtesy Bittertang Farm)

Studio Gang’s treehouse revamp of Writers Theatre isn’t the only North Shore performance space to dance with organic forms. Designers Michael Loverich and Antonio Torres of The Bittertang Farm won $15,000 to install a temporary stage for performances in Lake Forest, where renderings show sculpted piles of hay and wavy architectural forms that “melt into the existing landscape.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Biber Architects’ American Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 to Honor Food Trucks and Vertical Farming

The U.S. Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. (Courtesy Biber Architects)03-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper

 

The United States will celebrate one of its most prized national treasures at the next World’s Fair: the food truck. In honor of the theme of the 2015  Milano Expo—“Feed the Planet, Energy for Life”—the American Pavilion, called American Food 2.0, includes street-level food trucks that will serve up some favorite American dishes. James Biber, the New York City–based architect of the pavilion, told Business Insider, it’s not been decided which food trucks will be included at the site, but that there will be lobster rolls “for sure.”

But the pavilion design doesn’t end with food trucks.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architecture 101> Harvard Students Tackle Policy and Design for Post-Sandy Resiliency

JohnsonTramba_TrevorAlison2

A breakdown of Tramba and Johnson’s restructuring of the National Flood Insurance Program using Jersery City as a pilot site. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

As the Rebuild By Design jury mulls over a winner of its resiliency-based design competition to re-imagine the East Coast in light of Hurricane Sandy, students in Harvard’s Graduate School of Design have been creating their own ways to protect against the Next Big Storm. While their studio, titled “Design and Politics,” was purely academic, it was modeled on the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s official competition. The Dutchman in charge of Rebuild, Henk Ovink, oversaw the interdisciplinary teams of students, and representatives from half of Rebuild’s final ten teams served as jurors at the studio review.

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Bernard Tschumi’s First Project in Italy Blocked, Future Remains Uncertain

Architecture, International
Wednesday, May 14, 2014
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Anima's Exterior. (Courtesy Bernard Tschumi Architects)

Anima’s Exterior. (Courtesy Bernard Tschumi Architects)

Bernard Tschumi’s first project in Italy appears to be on hold—if it is not dead altogether. The regional Superintendence for Architecture and Landscape Heritage has blocked plans for the architect’s cultural center, called “ANIMA”, which was scheduled to open in Grottammare in 2017. The announcement about the plan’s fate was made the same day a retrospective on Tschumi’s work opened at the Pompidou Center in Paris—a retrospective that includes ANIMA, which stands for arts, nature, music, action.

Continue reading after the jump.

Studio Gang’s New York City “Solar Carve” Tower Moving Forward in Smaller Form

Studio Gang's Initial rendering for the "Solar Carve." (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Studio Gang’s Initial rendering for the “Solar Carve.” (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Studio Gang’s first New York City tower appears to be moving forward, albeit a little shorter than originally envisioned. Initial plans called for a 213-foot tall, 180,000-square-foot office tower—known as the “Solar Carve”—that would have been 34 percent larger than what is currently allowed on the site. After it became clear that wasn’t going to fly with the NYC Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA), the Carve’s developer, William Gottlieb Real Estate, withdrew its application leaving the fate of the project in jeopardy.

Continue reading after the jump.

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