Biber Architects’ American Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 to Honor Food Trucks and Vertical Farming

The U.S. Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. (Courtesy Biber Architects)03-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper

 

The United States will celebrate one of its most prized national treasures at the next World’s Fair: the food truck. In honor of the theme of the 2015  Milano Expo—“Feed the Planet, Energy for Life”—the American Pavilion, called American Food 2.0, includes street-level food trucks that will serve up some favorite American dishes. James Biber, the New York City–based architect of the pavilion, told Business Insider, it’s not been decided which food trucks will be included at the site, but that there will be lobster rolls “for sure.”

But the pavilion design doesn’t end with food trucks.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architecture 101> Harvard Students Tackle Policy and Design for Post-Sandy Resiliency

JohnsonTramba_TrevorAlison2

A breakdown of Tramba and Johnson’s restructuring of the National Flood Insurance Program using Jersery City as a pilot site. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

As the Rebuild By Design jury mulls over a winner of its resiliency-based design competition to re-imagine the East Coast in light of Hurricane Sandy, students in Harvard’s Graduate School of Design have been creating their own ways to protect against the Next Big Storm. While their studio, titled “Design and Politics,” was purely academic, it was modeled on the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s official competition. The Dutchman in charge of Rebuild, Henk Ovink, oversaw the interdisciplinary teams of students, and representatives from half of Rebuild’s final ten teams served as jurors at the studio review.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bernard Tschumi’s First Project in Italy Blocked, Future Remains Uncertain

Architecture, International
Wednesday, May 14, 2014
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Anima's Exterior. (Courtesy Bernard Tschumi Architects)

Anima’s Exterior. (Courtesy Bernard Tschumi Architects)

Bernard Tschumi’s first project in Italy appears to be on hold—if it is not dead altogether. The regional Superintendence for Architecture and Landscape Heritage has blocked plans for the architect’s cultural center, called “ANIMA”, which was scheduled to open in Grottammare in 2017. The announcement about the plan’s fate was made the same day a retrospective on Tschumi’s work opened at the Pompidou Center in Paris—a retrospective that includes ANIMA, which stands for arts, nature, music, action.

Continue reading after the jump.

Studio Gang’s New York City “Solar Carve” Tower Moving Forward in Smaller Form

Studio Gang's Initial rendering for the "Solar Carve." (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Studio Gang’s Initial rendering for the “Solar Carve.” (Courtesy Studio Gang)

Studio Gang’s first New York City tower appears to be moving forward, albeit a little shorter than originally envisioned. Initial plans called for a 213-foot tall, 180,000-square-foot office tower—known as the “Solar Carve”—that would have been 34 percent larger than what is currently allowed on the site. After it became clear that wasn’t going to fly with the NYC Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA), the Carve’s developer, William Gottlieb Real Estate, withdrew its application leaving the fate of the project in jeopardy.

Continue reading after the jump.

Tisk-Tisk: Lamster Lambasts Dallas Architects

Ah ah ah! (Montage by AN)

Ah ah ah! (Montage by AN)

Mark Lamster, Dallas Morning News architecture critic and responsible citizen, chastised the Dallas community for its poor attendance at an April 9 James Carpenter lecture. The 2004 MacArthur Fellow, who was speaking at the Dallas Center for Architecture about his newest installation at the Cotton Bowl, shed light on his genius to a paltry audience of 10. Ten, that is, if Carpenter included himself in the head count.

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Street Artist, JR, Tries Hand at Choreography with New York City Ballet

East
Tuesday, May 13, 2014
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(Paul Kolnik)

(Paul Kolnik)

Artists and architects often work in dance, designing sets, projections, costumes, and environments. Not often, however, does that artist actually get to choreograph. Here, JR, an artist who works in the public realm creating photo murals that are often a participatory experience with a community, such as a favela in Rio, or a slum in Delhi, has been given the opportunity to make his figures move.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Millennium Park Turns Ten! Here Are Ten Amazing Photos of Chicago’s Jewel Through the Years

(Katie Spence / Flickr)

(Katie Spence / Flickr)

Happy birthday, Millennium Park! Yes, the Chicago park named for the chronological milestone now 14 years in the rearview mirror is turning 10—it went famously over-schedule and over-budget but we love it nonetheless. Last year 4.75 million people visited Chicago’s front yard, taking in free concerts and events, and probably taking at least as many selfies with Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate and the flowing titanium locks of Frank Gehry‘s Pritzker Pavilion in the background.

In honor of the anniversary, the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events is kicking off a series of shows and exhibitions that includes new work from Crown Fountain designer Jaume Plensa. Hey, Jaume! Email us if you need another face for your 40-foot LED projection!

Here at AN, we’re celebrating with ten of our favorite photographs of the park taken over the past decade and more. Take a look below.

Ten amazing photos of Millennium Park after the jump!

Boston’s Green Line Extension Sending Real Estate Prices North

The Green Line in Boston. (Flickr /  bindonlane)

The Green Line in Boston. (Flickr / bindonlane)

Boston’s subway system—the “T”—is currently undergoing its first expansion in nearly three decades, pushing the city’s Green Line into the hip enclave of Somerville. And while the first stations in neighboring Somerville won’t open until 2017 (at the earliest), the promise of new transit is already transforming the city’s real estate market. The streetscape is coming next.

Continue reading after the jump.

One Small Step For Houston is One Giant Step Backward for Johnson Space Center

One of Johnson Space Center's control rooms (Photo Courtesy of NASA)

One of Johnson Space Center’s control rooms (Courtesy NASA)

AN recently profiled the emerging architectural typology of spaceports across the country, and now there’s news from the Houston site that helped launch the dream of space travel decades ago. Independence Shuttle, a full-scale replica of NASA’s iconic Space Shuttle, recently was moved from the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to its next-door neighbor, Space Center Houston.

To some people, the relocation was a matter of mere logistics. To others, however, the transfer symbolized not just a lessening of power and precedence associated with Johnson Space Center, but with NASA’s space program as a whole.

Continue reading after the jump.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s only handicap-accessible home opens for public tours

Frank Lloyd Wright's Laurent House at dusk. (Nels Akerlund)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Laurent House at dusk. (Nels Akerlund)

Decades before the Americans With Disabilities Act, Frank Lloyd Wright designed an accessible home for a World War II veteran. Now Wright’s only home designed for a person with a disability will open to the public. Wright’s Kenneth & Phyllis Laurent House in Rockford, Illinois opens for tours on June 6, two days before what would have been its architect’s 147th birthday.

Continue reading after the jump.

Floating Farnsworth: Mies van der Rohe’s Iconic Illinois House Could Get Flood Protection

Flooding at the Farnsworth House in mid-April 2014. (Courtesy Farnsworth House)

Flooding at the Farnsworth House in mid-April 2014. (Courtesy Farnsworth House)

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s archetypal modernist home, the Farnsworth House, is drowning. The banks of the Fox River served as an idyllic setting for the building’s white steel and glass when it landed in Plano, Illinois. But lately the Fox has gone rabid, spilling over its banks three times in the past 18 years. So what to do? Preservationists are looking at installing hydraulic jacks to lift the house during floods, to the tune of about $3 million. Call it the Three Million Dollar Modernist. Ironically Mies put the house on stilts to prevent such flooding; I guess you can’t outwit a wily Fox.

Corvette Museum Considering Making Giant Car-Swallowing Sinkhole A Permanent Exhibit

The sinkhole. (Courtesy National Corvette Museum)

The sinkhole. (Courtesy National Corvette Museum)

The sinkhole that opened up underneath the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky has quickly become one of the institution’s most popular exhibits. Just three months after eight prized automobiles slid down Planet Earth’s jagged gullet, visitors from around the country are flocking to the Bluegrass State to see the damage.

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