Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #20: 41 Cooper Square

East
Thursday, October 20, 2011
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41 Cooper Square by Thom Mayne. (Brandon Thomas / Flickr)

41 Cooper Square by Thom Mayne. (Brandon Thomas / Flickr)

Building of the Day #20: 41 Cooper Square
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art
New York, NY

Often “stats” and awards are known well before the public appreciates a new building’s urban role. Cooper Union’s 41 Cooper Square, designed by Thom Mayne, FAIA, of Morphosis Architects with Gruzen Samton as Associate Architect, is more than a volume for a multi-disciplinary academic building with a co-generation plant, cooling and heating ceiling panels, low V.O.C. materials, green terraces, and “Fit-City”-worthy vertical circulation. While these stats did help the client claim the first LEED Platinum-certified academic laboratory building, Cooper has also revived a former traffic triangle and extended its identity southwards along the new Bowery. At a time when both NYU and Columbia’s building goals face sharp scrutiny, it pays to have a tough skin. Make that a gritty double skin!

Continue reading after the jump.

Public Architecture, Conversations on Design and Public Impact

East
Thursday, October 20, 2011
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Left to right: Jess Zimbabwe, Jair Lynch, Frank Giblin, Gabriel Kroiz. (Amanda Hurley)

Left to right: Jess Zimbabwe, Jair Lynch, Frank Giblin, Gabriel Kroiz. (Amanda Kolson Hurley)

Last night, the Woolly Mammoth theater in downtown Washington, D.C. hosted a forum on design’s potential to affect social change, organized by the San Francisco nonprofit Public Architecture and sponsored by Teknion. Attendees filed into a rehearsal hall to hear four speakers from the public and private sectors who are using design to effect change on different scales.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gehry To The Rescue, With a Star-Studded Board

Newsletter, West
Thursday, October 20, 2011
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Gehry Technologies' BIM Model for the New World Symphony in Miami.

Frank Gehry is trying to save architecture, and it’s about time. His company Gehry Technologies, which provides technology and related services to design and construction firms, on Tuesday announced a plan to bring together “the world’s most distinguished architects” in a “strategic alliance” intended to transform the building and design industries through technology.

In other words they’ve put together a really impressive advisory board. The list of architects, designers, and business leaders includes: David Childs, Zaha Hadid, Greg Lynn, Laurie Olin, Wolf Prix, David Rockwell, Moshe Safdie, Patrik Schumacher, and Ben van Berkel. That’s no joke. Among other things, the group will strive to promote higher quality projects, greater efficiency, and more cost effective techniques.

Continue reading after the jump.

Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #19: East Harlem School

East
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
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East Harlem School by Peter Gluk and Partners. (Coutesy Peter Gluk and Partners)

A rainy day couldn’t dampen the spirits of the fourth graders that we met playing hoops in the brightly lit gym of the East Harlem School. It looks to me that there are two geniuses behind this wonderful building: Peter Gluck, the acerbic and seasoned architect/builder and Ivan M. Hageman, co-founder and Head of School.

Gluck led the tour, but Ivan was ever-present—in the cafeteria leading an appreciation of the chef and servers, and in the reception area meeting with parents. He welcomed us into his office, which is perched at the east end of the building with a clear glass open view up 103rd Street to the Public School embedded in the nearby housing project. Jane Jacobs eyes on the street.

Continue reading after the jump.

A Peek Inside A Noise Within

West
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
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Interior of theatre; with architectural detail over walkway to seats (Michael Gutstadt)

Longtime repertory company A Noise Within (ANW) will complete its move to Pasadena at the end of October. Formerly located inside an old Masonic Temple in Glendale, it now calls Edward Durell Stone’s midcentury modern Stuart Pharmaceutical Company home. The project was carried out by John Berry Architects, Robert J. Chattel, and DLR Group WWCOT. You might remember back in May when we showed you the project still under construction. ANW staffers have now started to move in and perform technical runs for their inaugural showing of Shakespeare’s The Twelfth Night.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Detroit Disassembled, Photographs by Andrew Moore

East, Midwest
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
.
Facade, Michigan Central Station, 2009. (Andrew Moore)

Facade, Michigan Central Station, 2009. (Andrew Moore)

Detroit Disassembled:
Photographs by Andrew Moore

Queens Museum of Art
Flushing Meadows Corona Park
Queens, NY
Through January15

The Queens Museum of Art (QMA) presents the powerful photography of Andrew Moore from his three-month visit to Detroit from 2008 to 2009. Moore’s photographs are a tragic yet beautiful glimpse into the decline of a city that was once the twentieth century industrial heart of America. Michigan Central Station (above) stands empty, the organ screen at the United Artists Theater is crumbling, and bright green moss covers the floor of the former Ford Motor Company Headquarters. “Moore’s exquisitely realized visions of architecture overtaken by vegetation remind contemporary viewers that our own familiar culture is subject to the forces of entropy and the eternal strength of nature,” says a statement from QMA.

More photos after the jump.

Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #18: 200 Fifth Avenue

East
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
.
200 Fifth Avenue. (Cynthia Kracauer/Center for Architecture)

200 Fifth Avenue. (Cynthia Kracauer/Center for Architecture)

Building of the Day #18: 200 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY

Beautiful weather continues to make Archtober the best month ever to enjoy great architecture. Madison Square, where 200 Fifth Avenue is located, is a palimpsest of the northward expansion of commerce and civilization in Manhattan. A public space since 1686, it first became a park in 1847. With the construction of the Fifth Avenue Hotel, (Griffith Thomas with William Washburn Architects, 1859) on the site of the current 200 Fifth, the area became the social, cultural, and political hub of elite New York in the years after the Civil War—think Edith Wharton. And it has the monuments to prove it.

More after the jump.

Dean’s List> ASLA Student Awards Reveal the Future of Landscape Architecture

Vegetation House by students from National Chiao Tung University. (Jheng-Ru Li and Chieh-Hsuan Hu)

Vegetation House by students from National Chiao Tung University. (Jheng-Ru Li and Chieh-Hsuan Hu)

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has announced the winners of its 2011 Student Awards. This year’s student honorees have developed concepts ranging from hillside habitats in Haiti, to vegetated houses in Taiwan, to a reclaimed airfield in Berlin. Entries demonstrate an idealistic and urgent approach to problem solving for today’s and tomorrow’s pressing social issues.

[ Also be sure to check out the winners of the ASLA 2011 Professional Awards. ]

Check out the winners after the jump.

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Tiny Islands to Clean the Cuyahoga

Midwest
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
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The Cuyahoga River (courtesy Sharon M. Leon/flickr)

The Cuyahoga River (courtesy Sharon M. Leon/flickr)

Hey, remember that time that stretch of the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland caught on fire? That wasn’t so great. Things have gotten better since then. We now have the Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Water Act, Superfund and lots of other pollution control and remediation tools. Things have gotten better along the Cuyahoga too. One segment of the river remains persistently sick though, the one mile stetch, lined with steel bulkheads, that runs through to downtown. Planners are trying a new method to reintroduce a softer edge–with plants and the attendant microrganisms and fish–while preserving the areas still active industrial and shipping character: floating artificial islands. Read More

55 Warren: One Scoop with Glitz on Top

East
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
.
Courtesy Leopoldo Rosati

A view up from the courtyard at 55 Warren, designed by OCV Architects and interior designer Leopold Rosati. (Courtesy Leopoldo Rosati)

Last week, we took a trip around the block from the AN office to go to an open house at 55 Warren hosted by Legrand, the French systems management company. While we were impressed with all the gizmos and glitzy gadgets, it was OCV Architect’s clever renovation of the old cast-iron building that grabbed our attention.

Check out the photos after the jump.

Just Can-Tastic: RTKL wins Canstruction LA 2011

West
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
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HMC and Buro Happold's "Feed Back Loop" won for best structural ingenuity (Tom Bonner)

When you see architects working feverishly into the night to arrange food cans into strange sculptures it can only mean one thing: CANstruction is back again! This year CANstruction LA took place at Westfield Culver City and featured creative designs from the likes of RTKL, HKS, Callison, and several other architecture and engineering firms. This year’s big winner was “Take a Bite out of Huger,” by RTKL, made of beans emerging from water waves to feast on tiny goldfish, but other fun designs included UFOs, abstract sculptures, and even food trucks. The event was organized by the Society for Design Administration, and all cans used go to the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank.

If you want to vote for the Peoples’ Choice award, go to Westfield Culver City’s Facebook page.

Check out more can-sculptures after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Trip 0˚00, Thinking Gates, Growing Art, and Mapping Pollution

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
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Walking the line. Watch artist Simon Faithfull travel both built and unbuilt environments along “the exact longitude of the Greenwich Meridian,” using a GPS device in his documentary project “0˚00 Navigation.”  Above is an excerpt through London, but you can also watch the whole thing here. (h/t Polis.)

At the city gates. In this short article at the Sustainable Cities Collective, Chuck Wolfe muses over what a “city gate” would be in a modern city, contending that Google streetview is one form of a modern gate incarnation. Is a physical gate just an ornament of memories, or do we need the architectural drama only a physical threshold can provide?

Art heals blight. As Elizabeth Currid-Halkett notes in the NY Times, art as a revitalization tool works, but not always. It takes more than just cheap rent and abandoned factory lofts to cultivate the next Soho. Take the case of Red Hook’s art scene from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle: art, given its mercurial nature, may be best left alone, like the somewhat-isolated Brooklyn neighborhood.

A map for Captain Planet. SkyTruth, a nonprofit environmental monitoring group, recently launched a real-time, interactive alert system that digitally maps domestic pollution events, such as toxic spills and air & water pollution. More at the LA Times blog.

 

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