QUICK CLICKS> Restored, Represented, Drafted (event tonight!)

Daily Clicks
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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The Secretariat building in Chandigarh, designed by Le Corbusier and completed 1954. Ben Leply/flickr.

Dilapidated modernism. Chandigarh, the northern Indian city planned and designed by Le Corbusier over 60 years ago, has become the focus of preservation efforts following years of neglect and piecemeal plundering, reports the UK’s Guardian.

Cycle support. Ray LaHood, Secretary of Transportation, spoke to attendees of the National Bike Summit in DC this week, encouraging them to lobby their congressional reps to take steps to make communities cycle-friendly. Streetsblog notes LaHood’s appearance coincides with the release of the Urban Bikeway Design Guide by the National Association of City Transportation Officials.

Pier on the half shell. The Battery Park City Authority has leased the languishing Pier A at the western edge of Battery Park to father-and-son restaurateurs Harry and Peter Poulakakos, who are promising to turn the pier and its landmark 1886 building into an oyster bar-beer garden with one heck of a view. More details in Crain’s NY.

Tonight: Drafted! In New York? Don’t miss AN executive editor Julie Iovine in conversation with Michael Graves, Granger Moorehead, Gisue Hariri and Jeffrey Bernett at 7pm tonight, Thursday, March 10 at the Museum of Arts and Design for Drafted: The Evolving Role of Architects in Furniture Design, part of MAD’s “The Home Front: American Furniture Now” series. Click here for tix.

 

World Trade Update: Sneak Peak Inside Tower One

East
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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Thanks to Council Member Margaret Chin’s office, we’re able to get a peak out the windows of One World Trade. Yesterday, Chin and fellow Council Members of the Lower Manhattan Redevelopment Committee got a tour of the 49th floor with Port Authority Executive Director Chris Ward. While “sweeping” and “majestic” are terms that will no doubt soon be overused in the future to describe the views, we’ll use them here, just this once.

Read More

Sit Up Straight: WXY Zipper Bench

East
Thursday, March 10, 2011
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WXY's new zipper benches welcome sitters at Peter Minuit Plaza.

New zipper benches designed by WXY are in place at Peter Minuit Plaza. The skateboard-proof benches in front of the Staten Island Ferry Terminal got a proper workout yesterday, despite the cold. The sinuous design begins as two benches facing opposite directions before zipping up and melding into one surface offering the sitter a choice of two views.

Morphing benches seem to be making statements in more places than just New York as well. Last week’s AN Fabrikator story spotlighted subway benches in Philly that scrunch up to discourage people from lying down.  It would seem that firms are taking on bad behavior by pushing the design envelope.

Check out a few more photos after the jump.

Art Center Dialing Down in Pasadena

West
Wednesday, March 9, 2011
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Art Center's Downtown Campus, located inside a former wind tunnel

Pasadena’s Art Center College of Design has always been ambitious about building. But after some pushback, it’s toning things down. Most architecture buffs know about the school’s iconic black steel hillside campus designed by Craig Ellwood, and its equally ambitious downtown campus designed by Daly Genik, located inside a former Douglas Aircraft wind tunnel.

But after its last director, Richard Koshalek, got pushed out largely for his super ambitious $150 million expansion plan, including a $45 million Frank Gehry-designed research center (many thought the school was putting more emphasis on facilities than teaching and students), the school’s new expansion plans, confirmed this week, involve renovations and smaller expansions, not big gestures, reports the Pasadena Star News.

More on the school’s future plans after the jump.

Facebook Charrette Offers Big Ideas for Menlo Park

Newsletter, West
Wednesday, March 9, 2011
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Residential towers with green roofs overlook a nature trail and bicycle path along wetlands. (Courtesy Paul Jamtgaard of Group 4 Architecture.)

Last Saturday, architecture took a cue from Project Runway. The assignment: In one fast-paced day, redesign a less-than-inspiring edge of a California town as a glamorous new transit-oriented development—starting with site analysis and ending in a formal presentation of conceptual designs. Among the days visions to sashay onto the stage were mixed-use high-rises, a light-rail station, green roofs and solar collectors, and an alluring gateway arch.

Read more after the jump.

Billings Dips But Stays in Positive Territory

National
Wednesday, March 9, 2011
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Billings (blue) and inquiries (red) for the past 12 months. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Billings (blue) and inquiries (red) for the past 12 months. (The Architect's Newspaper)

The Architecture Billing Index (ABI) dropped nearly four points in January, but just managed to stay in positive territory with a score of an even 50 (any score below 50 indicates shrinking billings). The new projects enquiry index also fell significantly from 61.6 in December to 56.5 in January, but remained comfortably in positive territory. Even with the fall in the indexes, the AIA believes the overall trend is stable with mild growth.

Read more after the jump.

Gimme Shelter: Bike Stations for Fresh Kills

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, March 8, 2011
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The new bike maintenance shelters make room for pedestrians. The roof holds the solar panels. Courtesy NYC Parks and Recreation/James Corner Field Operations

Despite all the controversy surrounding bike lanes and cyclists elsewhere in the city, Fresh Kills South has adopted a rather pro bike stance (though who’d expect there to be much disagreement when the only other traffic to contend with is that of joggers, pedestrians, and bird watchers). New bike maintenance stations designed by James Corner Field Operations will eventually dot the landscape of the of the entire park, and their design nods equally to both the biker and the walker.

Read more after the jump.

Quick Clicks>Trucking, Biking, Leaking, Exploring

Daily Clicks, East Coast
Tuesday, March 8, 2011
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Jaime Oliver's Food Revolution Truck debuted at TED and hit the highways.

Iron skillet meets iron fist. Some of the most striking visuals to come out of this year’s TED conference weren’t made for the stage but for the street: Jamie Oliver‘s Food Revolution truck, an 18-wheeled kitchen classroom designed pro bono by Rockwell Group, launched last week and represents just one of the outcomes of Oliver’s 2010 TED Prize wish to make kids healthier. The wish of this year’s TED Prize winner, the artist currently known as “JR,” is that people will participate in his global art project INSIDE/OUT and help paper streets with gigantic portraits of themselves. Step 1: set up photo booths that print poster size pics of conference participants–quite a surreal experience, writes Guy Horton for Good.

Get over it. So says the New Republic to New Yorkers who complain that New York DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan has stepped on some toes in her quest to make streets slimmer, bike lanes fatter, and pedestrians safer. The griping was highlighted in a March 4 profile of the commissioner in the New York Times.

Leaky legend. The Economist reports that Taliesin, Frank Lloyd Wright‘s home and studio in Spring Green, Wisconsin, is banking on this year’s 100th anniversary of the site to raise money for much-needed restoration work: the roof is leaking, the wood beams are sagging, and families of bats keep trying to settle down in the rafters.

Urban archaeology, armchair edition. Yurbanism rounds up new apps that are sure to appeal to urbanists, like “Abandoned,” which uses GPS to identify abandoned buildings near your location, complete with links to pics: “Explore modern day ruins from empty mental asylums to shipwrecks under the Great Lakes. Discover the history and location of dead amusement parks, overgrown hospitals, forgotten hotels and creepy ghost towns.”

Do You Want To Improve Homebuilding?

West
Tuesday, March 8, 2011
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Do you ever wonder why tract housing is so banal? Why Mediterranean knockoffs have become the vernacular of American residential architecture? Why our favorite architects don’t get involved in this gargantuan world? Then join us on March 17 at 7pm at the SPF:A Gallery (8609 Washington Blvd) in Culver City for a panel called BetterHomeBuilding, which will join architects and homebuilders in a discussion to not only improve the quality of tract residential developments but get architects more involved.

Check out who made the panel after the jump.

Swooping Bridges of Google Earth

Millau Bridge (Google Earth via Clement Valla)

Millau Bridge (Google Earth via Clement Valla)

Brooklyn-based architect and designer Clement Villa has collected a series of Google Earth views of bridges that appear to have melted, succumbing to gravity, and hanging languidly across their respective terrains, offering a surreal nod to Dali’s Persistence of Memory. (Via Notcot.)

Check out a few more examples after the jump.

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Event> Organic Architecture for the 21st Century

Midwest
Monday, March 7, 2011
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Courtesy Milwaukee Art Museum

Courtesy Milwaukee Art Museum

  • Frank Lloyd Wright: Organic Architecture for the 21st Century
  • Milwaukee Art Museum
  • 700 North Art Museum Dr.
  • Milwaukee, WI
  • Through May 15

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright is the single subject of the Milwaukee Art Museum’s new exhibit. Organic Architecture for the 21st Century, which celebrates the 100th anniversary of Taliesen, Wright’s Spring Green home and studio, also marks the debut of 33 never before seen drawings by the Wisconsin native. The show implores visitors to take a fresh look at Wright and his works, both built and unrealized, and how he envisioned architecture as something that had an essential relationship to context, time, and the people who lived or worked there. Sustainability, which we often think of as a 21st century innovation, is in keeping with many of Wright’s designs, especially those for a newly suburban America, including the outdoor arcade for the proposed Arizona State Capitol, Phoenix (above).

Organic Architecture for the 21st Century explores the idea that the famously outspoken architect was a visionary who foresaw trends including the use of mass produced materials, utilization of natural light, and attention to the surrounding environment. In addition to covering his major works, like Fallingwater, the Johnson Wax factory, and the Unity Temple, the exhibit also showcases plans for Living City, a culmination of Wright’s work and his utopian vision for suburbia.

Mixed Media> SHoP Talk: Botswana Innovation Hub

International
Monday, March 7, 2011
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The roofscape of the SHoP-designed Botswana Innovation Hub.

With over 270,000 square feet and costs projected at $50 million, the Botswana Information Hub is ambitious on many levels, both literally and figuratively. The winner of an international competition, the SHoP-designed research campus brings green technology to the Gaborone, Botswana.

The sinuous structure merges into the landscape, with various levels seeming to kinetically lift from the earth. An “energy blanket” roofscape blends solar and water re-use systems into the sweeping composition. Gregg Pasquarelli tells AN all about it.

Check out the interview after the jump.

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