City Center Slicker

East
Thursday, October 27, 2011
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The newly restored City Center opened on Tuesday. (Aislinn Weidele / Ennead Architect)

The newly restored City Center reopened on Tuesday.(Aislinn Weidele / Ennead Architects)

You could literally smell the champagne aroma at Tuesday night’s gala reopening of New York City Center. Row upon row of glasses were poured just before the doors opened to reveal Ennead’s $56 million renovation of the beloved hall. Backstage, wide-eyed dancers and musicians rushed with palpable pre-performance angst. Duncan Hazard, Ennead’s partner in charge of the restoration, gave us a whirlwind tour before the curtain went up.

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On View> Modernism in Miniature at the Canadian Centre for Architecture

East
Thursday, October 27, 2011
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Model of San Remo Apartment, Carlo Mollino and Mario Roggero, 1946. (Courtesy CCA)

Model of San Remo Apartment, Carlo Mollino and Mario Roggero, 1946. (Courtesy CCA)

Modernism in Miniature: Points of View
Canadian Centre for Architecture
1920, rue Baile
Montréal, Québec
Through January 8

Modernism in Miniature examines the relationship between architectural model-making and photography, spanning the years 1920 to 1960. It posits model photography as its own genre, exploring the evolution and visual methods used to capture these miniature architectural representations. Focusing on the encounter between media and architecture, the exhibition investigates the link between design and mass media with themes such as “Object and Image” and the “Art of Simulation.” Models by architects including Mies van der Rohe, Oscar Niemeyer, Le Corbusier, and Carlo Mollino (his model for a San Remo apartment, above) illustrate the changing architectural expression and visual representation of mid-century modernism.

More images after the jump.

Taking a new PATH in Portland

Shft+Alt+Del, West
Wednesday, October 26, 2011
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Corey Martin. (Paula Watts)

Corey Martin. (Paula Watts)

Corey Martin, co-founder of Portland-based PATH Architecture (we featured their Butler Residence in our pages a little while back) has left the five-person firm to become a principal at 45-person Portland firm THA Architecture. Martin worked at Richard Potestio and Allied Works prior to starting PATH in 2005 with partner Ben Kaiser. The firm has gone on to produce critically acclaimed projects ranging from the Park Box multi-family residence to a locker room for the University of Oregon.

Continue reading after the jump.

Stage 1 Finalists Announced for National Mall Design Competition

East, National, Newsletter
Wednesday, October 26, 2011
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The National Mall. (Vlasta Juricek / Flickr)

The National Mall. (Vlasta Juricek / Flickr)

The Trust for the National Mall has announced the finalists for the first round of its National Mall Design Competition. The 700-acres of parkland have been worn down over the years thanks hoards of visitors (25 million a year), marches, and certain bi-annual decathalons. The scope of the competition includes three distinct areas of the mall: Union Square, the Washington Monument Grounds at Sylvan Theater, and Constitution Gardens. Finalists were selected for each area, and will move on to stage two of the competition (team interviews), and then—finally—a selected few will be asked to envision a design for one of the three designated area.

Check out the finalists after the jump.

CityLights Finally Begin to See Daylight

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, October 26, 2011
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New York City's new street lights are making their debut downtown. (AN/Stoelker

New York City's new streetlights are making their debut downtown. (AN/Stoelker)

Approximately six years after Thomas Phifer and Partners, the Office for Visual Interaction, and Werner Sobek won the CityLights competition for a new standard streetlight, some of the first examples are popping up in Lower Manhattan. The design for LED streetlights was cutting edge at the time, and the technology was very expensive. Prices for energy efficient LED’s have fallen considerably since then, allowing the ultra slim fixtures to find their way onto city streets. Read More

White Mannequins Are the New Ghost Bikes

Midwest
Wednesday, October 26, 2011
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(Courtesy CDOT)

Yesterday, Chicago’s Department of Transportation (CDOT) began a new pedestrian safety initiative, in hopes of taming the aggressive driving habits of city residents. Following in the footsteps of the grassroots Ghost Bikes campaigns–where cycling advocates place anonymous white painted bikes at the sites where cyclists have been killed–the program includes 32 white mannequins placed along Wacker Drive. The mannequins refer to the 32 pedestriand deaths in the city last year. Read More

Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #25: Alice Tully Hall at Julliard

East
Wednesday, October 26, 2011
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Detail of stage at Alice Tully Hall (Courtesy FX Fowle)

Detail of stage at Alice Tully Hall (Courtesy FX Fowle)

Rather than add a few hundred more words to the tens of thousands already devoted to praise the Diller Scofidio + Renfro / FXFOWLE renovation of the Julliard School and Alice Tully Hall, I think today that I will remember the original architect, Pietro Belluschi (1899-1994). As a young faculty member at the University of Virginia, I got to know his work a bit. He designed the UVA School of Architecture. The building was muscular, had clear structure, and well expressed the late 1960s/early ‘70s last gasps of Brutalism.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> Virgin goes Galactic

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, October 25, 2011
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The Virgin Galactic Spaceport by Foster + Partners. (Nigel Young / Foster+Partners)

The Virgin Galactic Spaceport by Foster + Partners. (Nigel Young / Foster+Partners)

A quick flashback: Back in 2005, Virgin Group’s latest venture, Virgin Galactic, and the State of New Mexico had announced that they had reached an “historic agreement”—that they would build a state-funded $200 million spaceport in New Mexico. Virgin planned to provide sub-orbital space flights to the paying public, along with sub-orbital space science missions and orbital launches of small satellites (and much later, even orbital human space-flights). The facility was to be designed by Foster + Partners, who won Virgin Galactic’s international architectural competition.

Now, the Virgin Galactic Spaceport America—the world’s first commercial spaceport—has officially launched. Aimed to “articulate the thrill of space travel for the first space tourists while making a minimal impact on the environment,” the spaceport is designed to resemble, when viewed from space, Virgin Galactic’s brand logo of the eye, with an elongated pupil–the elevated apron completes the iris. Check out the photos after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Brooklyn Bucket, Rebuilding Libya, House Cycle, Abandoned City

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, October 25, 2011
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Courtesy Civic Center and Caroline Oh

Courtesy Civic Center and Caroline Oh

Brooklyn’s Bucket. An unsightly construction fence along Brooklyn’s Fulton Street has recently been transformed into NYC’s own giant chalkboard installation “Before I Die…,” a public participation project originally started in New Orleans by artist and TED fellow Candy Chang. Locals have been writing up their bucket lists, some as simple as “get paid,” some as serious as “to forget.” More on Artlog and Candy Chang’s blog.

G-oahead-afi. Gaddafi’s death last week was a historic event for Libya, but it also ushers in an era of uncertainty. Among the challenges that the new Libya must face is development, or rather the potential for uncontrolled overdevelopment. Concerned British architects are warning Libyans not to give way to “untrammelled development” during this “dangerous moment,” reported bdonline.

Cyclical Home. A new Philips’ design project called “the Microbial Home” is all about cycles, specifically how one function’s output can be another’s input. For instance, a bio-digestor island converts waste into methane gas that in turn powers a light made of bio-luminescent bacteria fed with methane. Check out the images on psfk.

Modern Ruins. Strange Harvest featured images of the abandoned architectural ruins of Pruit Igoe in St. Louis, which has now become a forest that “grows out of all that socio-political debris.” One image of a lone lamp post protruding from a complete forest is a surreal reminder of the relationship between architecture, politics, and time.

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Inside Archtober “Building” of the Day #24: Subway Vent Benches

East
Monday, October 24, 2011
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An MTA flood mitigation filter in Queens. (Courtesy Laura Ann Trimble/Center for Architecture)

An MTA flood mitigation filter in Queens. (Courtesy Laura Ann Trimble/Center for Architecture)

Even though Hurricane Irene blew through on August 27th without flooding the subways, which were rendered prophylactically still and silent for a day, a pesky summer storm in 2007 dumped so much water onto the M and R lines that they were forced out of service. Governor Spitzer took immediate action to mitigate the problem, and boldly mobilized the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Department of Transportation to do something about it. Solving a range of engineering problems while at the same time providing a streetscape element with some wit and whimsy, Rogers Marvel Architects created banks of raised stainless steel grates that rise up into an undulating wave of slats and hammered speckled side walls.

Continue reading after the jump.

Redesigning Chicago’s Navy Pier: And Then There Were 11

Midwest
Monday, October 24, 2011
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(courtesy Navy Pier)

The 52 two teams competing to redesign Chicago’s Navy pier have been narrowed down to 11. Lots of heavy hitters made the cut, including teams headed by BIG, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas/Studio Gang, James Corner Field Operations. Many of Chicago’s leading firms are represented on the teams. See the complete list after the jump

On View> Nancy Holt: Sightlines at the Graham Foundation

Midwest
Monday, October 24, 2011
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Nancy Holt's "Sun Tunnels," 1978. (Courtesy Graham Foundation)

Nancy Holt's "Sun Tunnels," 1978. (Courtesy Graham Foundation)

NANCY HOLT: Sightlines
The Graham Foundation
Four West Burton Place
Chicago
Through December 17

Beginning her artistic career in the 1960s, Nancy Holt helped pioneer the Land Art movement alongside artists like Richard Serra and Robert Smithson, who was her husband and occasional collaborator. Nancy Holt: Sightlines at the Graham Foundation presents documentation of over 40 of her monumental and ecologically-focused projects through photography, film, and artist’s books, revealing Holt’s eloquent mode of navigating the intersection of art and nature.

In Sun Tunnels, an installation and 1978 film (above), sunlight interacts with four concrete tunnels in the Great Basin Desert in Utah, exemplifying Holt’s interest in space and time by highlighting how the passage of the sun impacts each tunnel differently and in a way specific to that location. In addition to presenting previously unseen materials from the artist’s archive, the exhibition, which concentrates on the Holt’s work between 1966 and 1980, features the documentary Pine Barrens (1975) about undeveloped land in New Jersey, and documentation of the projects Swamp (1971, in collaboration with Smithson), Boomerang (1973, in collaboration with Serra), and the multi-monitor installation Points of View (1974), a piece that underscores the different perspectives we bring to viewing the landscape.

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