Quick Clicks> Libeskind Collapse, Rahm′s DOT Pick, Gaudi Attacked, and Bamboo in Wyoming

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, April 19, 2011
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A pool in Daniel Libeskind's Westside retail center collapsed (Mike Bischoff/Flickr)

A pool in Daniel Libeskind's Westside retail center collapsed (Mike Bischoff/Flickr)

Watch for Falling Libeskinds. The breaking news of the day from Building Design: Daniel Libeskind’s $555 million Westside retail center in Bern, Switzerland has collapsed for a second time in three years. An elevated swimming pool fell into the building injuring two people. An investigation is pending. In 2008, shortly after the building was completed, the roof of a fast food restaurant inside the center collapsed, injuring two children.

Transporting Chicago. Transportation Nation reports today that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has tapped Gabe Klein to head up the city’s DOT. Widely viewed as a pro-bike kind of guy in his former role as head of Washington D.C.’s DOT, Klein helped launch a bike-share program, expand bike lanes, and install electric car charging stations across the city. Could more alternative transportation be in store for the Windy City?

Gaudi Burns. An arsonist set fire to Antoni Gaudí’s Segrada Familia in Barcelona said the Guardian. The cathedral’s sacristy was destroyed and the crypt heavily damaged during the attack. Some 1,500 tourists were evacuated and four treated for smoke inhalation.

Wisconsin Bamboo. Sarah F. Cox talks with NYC-based architecture firm Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis for Curbed about a recently completed student center at the University of Wyoming which includes a stunningly intricate bamboo-lattice screen.

Eric Moss Cactus Tower Turns Things Upside Down

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, April 19, 2011
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©Tom Bonner

Don’t look now, Eric Owen Moss has put another landmark along the eastern edge of Culver City with the completion of the Cactus Tower on Hayden tract. Upending the usual relationship of earth and sky, he’s placed cactus plants high above the air, suspending them within a severe steel frame.

Read more after the jump.

Signs of Life for Architecture?

National
Tuesday, April 19, 2011
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John Morefield's Architecture 5 Cents project captured the feeling of the recession. Are things picking up?

According to Crain’s New York, the city’s five biggest firms began rehiring last year. Kohn, Pederson Fox, Perkins Eastman, Gensler, HOK, and SOM all began staffing-up, though all five firms pointed to international work as driving much of the growth. “New York started coming out of the recession earlier than the rest of the country, and business is improving, but it’s still uneven,” Bradford Perkins, chairman and chief executive of Perkins Eastman, told the business journal. Perkins Eastman added around 30 architects last year. Nationally, billings have been back in positive territory for the last few months, though results vary substantially by region. And today the AP reported that new home construction is beginning to bounce back. Are you feeling a rebound?

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Unveiled>Blaffer Art Museum Renovation by Work AC

National
Monday, April 18, 2011
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The new entrance to the Blaffer Art Museum in Houston. (all images courtesy WORK ac)

The New York-firm WORK Architecture Company is retooling the Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston. The intervention, which includes a new entrance and circulation plan, should dramatically boost the visibility of the museum. It shares a large 1970s concrete building with the university’s art school, and it is currently accessed off an interior courtyard.  The architects are moving the entrance to the north side of the building, with a new cantilevered interior staircase serving as a portico. Read More

Quick Clicks> Demolition Roundup and a Fortress, Too

Daily Clicks
Monday, April 18, 2011
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Land's End demolition in progress (CBS News via Gothamist)

Land's End demolition in progress (CBS News via Gothamist)

Land’s Literal End. A sprawling 25-room colonial mansion called Land’s End on Long Island’s North Shore has been torn down. Gothamist and Curbed link to a CBS video of the destruction of the house said to have inspired the decadence of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

Fortress in Disguise. Shortlist found a house that can transform itself from a windowless cube of a fortress into a modern luxury mansion with the press of a button. The appropriately named Safe House was designed by KWK Promes architecture

Treme Teardown. Preservationists in New Orleans are pushing to save the 1950s-era Phillis Wheatley elementary school designed by Charles Colbert from the wrecking ball. The Times Picayune reports that Tulane architects and a Treme actress are leading the call.

The Urban 30. We’re tickled to be named in OCU’s list of 30 Best Blogs for Urban Planning Students!

Renewal 2.0. The NY Times ran a recent story about the proposed rebuilding of Quincy, Mass. The public-private partnership would tear town most of the city’s urban core and start over again with a massive roughly $1.5 billion project to create a new downtown. While the article doesn’t articulate what would be lost, it does speculate on the size of the real estate gamble if the project falls through.

Presenting the Winners of the AIA SF Awards

Newsletter, Shft+Alt+Del, West
Sunday, April 17, 2011
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Ogrydziak Prillinger's Gallery House, heard but not seen. Photograph by Tim Griffith, courtesy of the architects.

On Thursday, the architecturati were at the War Memorial Performing Arts Center’s Green Room to see who won in this year’s AIA SF Awards. This year only saw 27 awards presented, half the number of last year’s 54–perhaps an indication of how hard the economic downturn has hit this area. But despite the shorter program, there was no shortage of distinctive projects.

Check out more of the winners after the jump.

EVENT> Julius Shulman Los Angeles book launch in LA (tonight!) & NYC (April 21)

East, West
Friday, April 15, 2011
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This week Rizzoli releases Julius Shulman Los Angeles: The Birth of a Modern Metropolis co-authored by AN’s own West Coast editor Sam Lubell and Doug Woods. The book features the seven decades’ worth of images (many never published), not only of Shulman’s iconic photographs of mid-century houses by Neutra and Eames but also of his lesser known explorations of the streetscapes and surroundings of the city he most adored, Los Angeles. The publisher is marking the occasion with events in Los Angeles (April 15) and New York City (April 21).

TONIGHT in Los Angeles!

7:00 p.m., Friday, April 15 :

Meet the authors, who will discuss the book as part of a panel (among the featured speakers is Judy McKee, Shulman’s only child and the executor of his estate) and book signing.

Location: Julius Shulman Institute at Woodbury University, 7500 Glenoaks Boulevard, Burbank , CA

 

NEXT WEEK in New York!

5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21:

Book signing with author Sam Lubell.

Location: Rizzoli Bookstore, 31 West 57th St., New York

 

Please visit AN’s diary for more info.

Quick Clicks> Dampers, Doubletake, Taxes, Kaboom!

Daily Clicks
Friday, April 15, 2011
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How mass damper systems provide counter-vibrations to earthquakes (Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan).

Earthshaking Costs.  The cost of an earthquake goes well beyond the financial, as the world witnessed with the disaster in Japan, but preventative measures do cost;  Architizer cites a report by California Watch that warns of cost-cutting and corruption in the cash strapped state, boiling down the numbers and creating clear cut infographics to illustrate the need and function of base isolation and mass dampers.

Bring Me Your Tired One Arm Bandits. With all due respect to our Nevada brethren, New Yorkers are somewhat chagrined to learn that the Post Office will not fix their goof of putting an image of the Las Vegas rendition of Lady Liberty on a new stamp rather than an image of the original in the New York Harbor. Officials say the teenage version will stay, prompting Ed Koch to sound off to The Times “…the post office is doing a stupid thing.”

Riverfront Fortress. With tax day looming, don’t try to go postal with the IRS in Philly. You won’t stand a chance. The agency has taken over the main branch of the old Post Office overlooking the Schuylkill River. The WPA-era grand limestone edifice took on $252 million makeover, and Philadelphia Inquirer critic Inga Saffron is not impressed. Saffron says the building, heralded as the new gateway to University City, keeps the gates closed by overdoing security measures (via ArchNews).

Kaboom! NBC affiliate in the Bay Area has footage of the demolition of the last remaining WWII-era military hospital in California (via Curbed).

Molo′s Nebuta House Ribbon Screen

Fabrikator
Friday, April 15, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by: 

Each bent steel ribbon is unique (Molo)

Steel takes on a paper-like appearance at Aomori’s new cultural center, creating a dynamic backdrop for life on the Japanese city’s waterfront.

Nearly a decade ago, Vancouver-based design and production studio Molo Design won an international competition for its design of a housing and community project in Aomori, Japan. As firm founders Stephanie Forsythe and Todd MacAllen worked with the City of Aomori in the years following the competition, the design evolved into that of a cultural center celebrating the city’s yearly Nebuta festival, during which huge mythical creatures made of wood, wire, paper, and lights are paraded through the streets. Though millions attend the festival every August, the cultural center would provide an opportunity for more visitors to witness their creation throughout the year.

Continue reading after the jump.

Preserving the Legacy of Architect Andrew Geller

East, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, April 14, 2011
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Pearlroth House, Westhampton Beach, New York, 1958 (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

Pearlroth House, Westhampton Beach, New York, 1958 (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

[ Editor's Note: Jake Gorst, documentary filmmaker and grandson of Andrew Geller has submitted this guest post relating preservation efforts to save the architect's archive. ]

Efforts are currently underway to catalog and preserve architect Andrew Geller’s architectural archive, which consists of hundreds of drawings, thousands of photographs and pieces of correspondence, and several scale models. To preserve this archive, a film on Geller’s work and the preservation process is currently under production. The archive will ultimately end up at an academic facility for future generations to study.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Architecture in Store, Meier is Gilt-y, Clean Air Square, and Suburban Slums

Daily Clicks
Thursday, April 14, 2011
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Van Alen Books hosting an opening party on Thursday, April 21 (Courtesy Van Alen Institute)

Van Alen Books hosting an opening party on Thursday, April 21 (Courtesy Van Alen Institute)

Just Architecture. The Van Alen Institute announced that NYC is about to welcome its first bookstore and reading room singularly devoted to architecture, Van Alen Books, located on 30 West 22nd Street. Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang Architects (and one of the two candidates for the next PennDesign Architecture Dean) and architectural historian Anthony Vidler will be presenting their latest books at the opening party scheduled for next Thursday, April 21.

Flash Sale Curator. Curbed shows today that there is no boundary for what architects can do. A popular flash sale venue, Gilt Groupe, is having a home products sale today at noon, curated by an architect, Richard Meier. Items up for sale include “a signed copy of Taschen’s Meier, a mezuzah he designed for The Jewish Museum of New York, and his Architectonic Menorah,” normally sold for $1K!

Breathing Times. According to Streetsblog, New York’s Times Square, visited by 250,000 pedestrians each day, has become much more breathable since the 2009 installation of pedestrian plazas (find out why Bill Clinton is a fan) on Broadway. Concentrations of two traffic-related air pollutants, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide, have gone down by 63% and 41%, respectively!

Suburban Slumification. Business Insider identifies 18 cities (including a less-than-expected Minneapolis) where suburbs are rapidly turning into slums. In the past, cities suffered crimes and poverty during recessions, while the rich stayed away in their safe suburban havens. But not anymore. Suburban slums are growing five times faster than cities.

Video> wHY Architecture Reveals Speed Art Museum Design for Louisville (Updated)

Midwest
Thursday, April 14, 2011
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The new Speed design features dramatic cantilevered volumes facing a public plaza. (Courtesy wHY Architecture)

The new Speed design features dramatic cantilevered volumes facing a public plaza. (Courtesy wHY Architecture)

Louisville’s Speed Art Museum has unveiled plans for a new addition designed by Culver City, CA-based wHY Architecture with Reed Hilderbrand landscape architects. Located on the campus of the University of Louisville, the museum hopes to increase connections with the city and the university along with increasing gallery and educational space. The scope of wHY’s work includes 200,000 square feet of new and renovated space in three phases valued at $79 million. The first phase including the new north structure will begin construction this year.

A fly-through (after the jump) offers a peak at the design, which calls for a simple monumental form next to the 1920s-era Beaux-Arts main building that cantilevers over a stand of trees forming an outdoor room and cafe on the campus facing side. A large garage-like door opens out to the garden. The street facing side features an outdoor amphitheatre-like seating set in the ground and a large reflecting pool. A cantilever staircase will be visible through the street facing facade.

More renderings and a fly-through video after the jump.

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