SHFT+ALT+DEL> Design Moves for 09.23.2011

Shft+Alt+Del
Friday, September 23, 2011
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SHFT+ALT+DLT

SHFT+ALT+DLT

Design Trust for Public Space has announced the appointment of Susan Chin as the new Executive Director, effective October 10.  Chin has served as Assistant Commissioner for Capital Projects for the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs for over twenty years.

John Henderson has been appointed Managing Director at Morris Adjmi Architects.  Henderson was previously studio director at Clodagh Design in Manhattan.  Prior to this position, he was associate principal at STUDIOS Architecture in New York and D.C.

Material ConneXion and its sister company, Culture & Commerce, both part of Sandow Media Corporation, have announced the appointment of Susan Towers to the position of VP Marketing & Communications.  Towers was previously a partner at NICE Partners and has held marketing and PR roles with Kiehl’s since 1851 and Chandelier Towers, among others.

The New York City Department of Buildings has appointed Fred Mosher to the newly created title of Deputy Commissioner of Building Development to streamline the city’s construction process. Previously, Mosher was a senior technical architect at Skidmore Owings & Merill for nine years.

The beleaguered American Folk Art Museum, which will continue operations at 2 Lincoln Square, has appointed a new president of the board: Edward V. (Monty) Blanchard, Jr., a member of the museum’s board of directors since 2003.

Have news on career moves in the architecture & design universe for SHFT+ALT+DEL? Send your tips to people@archpaper.com!

Voting open for the Solar Decathlon People’s Choice Awards

Other
Friday, September 23, 2011
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Students from City College of New York make final preparations before heading to Washington, D.C. (Courtesy of Team New York / Solar Decathlon)

Collegiate teams around the globe have been challenged by the U.S. Department of Energy  to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that aim at sustainability. The Solar Decathlon‘s winning team will be one that understands the importance of the Solar Decathlon competition by designing a home through the lens of affordability, design appeal and solar accumulation for energy efficiency.

As the contestants set up their designs on West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C., you can take a look at the innovative entries at the Solar Decathalon and cast your vote in the People’s Choice Awards. Voting ends September 30th at 7pm EST and you can cast one vote per email address. As of this publishing, Team New York was in the lead, followed by Appalachian State and Team China. If you’re near D.C., be sure to check out the houses in person through October 2.

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Spotlight> Beijing Design Week

International
Friday, September 23, 2011
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(Courtesy Beijing Design Week)

(Courtesy Beijing Design Week)

Beijing Design Week
September 26–October 3

Beijing Design Week, now in its second year, aims to change the catchphrase “Made in China” to “Designed in China.” The festival will bring together 30 local and international design firms for packed roster of events focusing on urban design and including Dutch artist/architect Daan Roosegaarde’s experiments with LEDs (above). Design Week will take over the whole city, staging happenings everywhere from the trendy 798 art district to Tiananmen Square, whose neighboring historic district will host pop-up shops and street art installations, to the site of the China Millenium Monument, where Paul Cocksedge will unveil an installation on October 1. This year London was invited to be Beijing’s “guest city,” and emissaries from the London Design Festival will translate some of their most successful ideas and activities into a new context.

RFQ> Rethinking the Public Spaces of Chicago’s Navy Pier

Midwest
Friday, September 23, 2011
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(Courtesy Navy Pier)

Navy Pier has launched an international search for a team to re-envision its public spaces. The multi-tiered process includes a RFQ for design teams, followed by a selection 10 teams who will be asked to supply additional information about key members. Five finalists will receive will be asked to submit design proposals, and given a $50,000 stipend. The winning team and design will be selected in mid February.  Read More

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IwamotoScott Architecture: Bookshelf Screen Wall

Fabrikator, West
Friday, September 23, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:
(Courtesy IwamotoScott)

(Courtesy IwamotoScott)

Lisa Iwamoto and Craig Scott, principals at IwamotoScott Architecture first established a relationship with Obscura Digital, a digital media company, three years ago in order to collaborate on a new hemispheric theater encased in a geodesic dome in Dubai. While the project was scuttled by the recession, the two firms stayed in touch, and when Obscura acquired new office space in a 1940s-era warehouse in an up-and-coming San Francisco neighborhood, they again called on IwamotoScott to design it, and even invited the architects to move into their new space.

Working with a tight budget, IwamotoScott injected digitally fabricated details that would give focus and add drama to the large industrial space. A black-box conference room that Scott describes as bringing “shrink-wrap to seismic bracing” is perched on the edge of a second-floor mezzanine while a 32-foot laser-cut screen wall comprised of cells that appear to collapse into fluid scales sequesters the architect’s space within the digital media company’s headquarters.

Continue reading after the jump.

Park 51 Opens to the Public

East
Thursday, September 22, 2011
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Park 51 opened to the public today.

Just around the corner from AN’s office sits the so-called Ground Zero Mosque. The image of a police officer guarding the mostly empty cast iron building has become such a part of the landscape, that we barely notice it anymore. But today, the doors were flung open onto a brightly lit gallery space adorned with color photographs of New York children representing almost every nation on earth.

Read More

Quick Clicks> Cul-de-Sack, Talking Transit, Hollywood Project, Park(ing) Police

Daily Clicks
Thursday, September 22, 2011
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Courtsey Ian Lockwood

Cul-de-Sacked. Emily Badger of The Atlantic‘s newly launched Atlantic Cities argued that the cul-de-sacs—the suburban answer to the overcrowded urban grids—may be a dead-end in more ways that one. Badger said cul-de-sacs are responsible for our decreased sense of safety, and moreover, happiness.

Talking Transit. Gothamist is right on calling out New York’s MTA as being “really into technology this month.” In a win for the constantly connected and a potential loss for our already-hectic commutes, starting Tuesday, AT&T and T-Mobile subscribers can pull out their cell phones and talk away on underground cell service through the 14th Street corridor. It will take the MTA five years to fully cover the entire New York subway system. Five more years of relative peace-and-quiet.

Paramount Makeover. The LA Times reported that Paramount Pictures is planning a whopping $700-million upgrade to its Hollywood lot, creating nearly 7,300 jobs during construction over next two decades. Rios Clemente Hale Studios and Levin & Associates Architects are charged with improving a place that hasn’t seen much change since the Gary Cooper days without compromising its old Hollywood charm.

Park(ing) police. A Miami-based PARK(ing) Day organizer created a green oasis for the day-long celebration of public space, putting up planters and bringing seats, tables, and WiFi, but according to police, he lingered a little too long. Police arrested the man for taking too long to clean up his parklet the next day, reported Streetsblog.

 

On View> Bertrand Goldberg: Architecture of Invention

Midwest
Thursday, September 22, 2011
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(Courtesy AIC)

Early scheme for Prentice Women's Hospital. (Courtesy AIC)

Bertrand Goldberg:
Architecture of Invention
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago
Through January 15, 2012

Bertrand Goldberg has become known, and increasingly loved, for his expressive use of concrete, particularly his curved forms in projects like Marina City and the endangered old Prentice Women’s Hospital (an early design for that project is pictured at top, with a San Diego theater scheme). The first retrospective of his work shows there is so much more to admire about this one-of-a-kind Chicago architect who died in 1997 at 84. Drawn from the Art Institute’s Goldberg collection and several other collections, Bertrand Goldberg: Architecture of Invention includes more than 100 drawings, models, and photographs, including designs for housing, hospitals, urban plans, furniture, and graphics. Early in his career, he designed innovative, prefabricated solutions for low-cost housing. His later designs, like “the city within a city” attracted avant-gardes around the world, including the Japanese Metabolists and Britain’s Archigram.

More images after the jump.

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An Urban Design Week Round-Up

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 21, 2011
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An outline of Urban Tactics from the City Sessions debate. (Molly Heintz)

An outline of Urban Tactics from the City Sessions debate. (Molly Heintz)

Following Thursday evening’s Urban Design Week (UDW) launch party hosted by the Institute for Urban Design (IfUD) at the breezy BMW Guggenheim Lab, the AN team dispersed to check out various events on the jam-packed UDW roster. We compiled our notes, and here’s a quick sampling of what we saw and heard:

Saturday, September 17: A small contingent of planners, landscape architects, and artists met up at Montefiore Park, a tiny triangle of a plaza at 137th Street where Broadway slices through Manhattan’s orderly grid. The group was invited to offer feedback on an installation at the site entitled Broadway: 1000 Steps. The interactive piece by Mary Miss (and CaLL) is an experiment in educating the public on environmental issues through artwork. A collection of periscope-like tubes and mirrors confront passersby with stats on sustainability initiatives in the city. Keep your eyes peeled—the piece will work its way down Broadway over the course of the next few months.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Parks Closing, Shocking Design, Broad-casting, Met Money

Daily Clicks
Wednesday, September 21, 2011
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Los Encinos State Historic Park (via LA Times)

Closing Time. Seventy historic state parks across California are slated for closure this year due to budget cuts. The Los Angeles Conservancy has more information on the parks, five of which are in the Los Angeles area, including Los Encinos State Park and the Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic Park.

Scary Design. The art, literary, and film magazine Zeotrope: All-Story, founded by Francis Ford Coppola, has invited Rodarte fashion designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy to design the Fall 2011 issue. The theme is “Horror,” where artists, designers, writers, and other contributors explore the scary, the Gothic, and the sublime. More info at Zeotrope.

Broad-casting. Can’t get enough Diller Scofidio + Renfro? Now you can watch the construction of DS+R’s Broad Museum in Los Angeles 24 hours a day on a live camera feed that allows viewers to track construction progress and view high resolution photography taken every 15 minutes. The museum is expected to be completed in 2013. Via the LA Times.

Tourism and The MetThe Met Press Room shared that their summer 2011 exhibition season, including the enormously popular “Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty” show, brought in $90.8 million for New York City. “Using the industry standard for calculating tax revenue impact, the study found that the direct tax benefit to the City and State from out-of-town visitors to the Museum totaled some $90.8 million,” according to the Met. Sixty-eight percent of museum visitors were not from New York City and stayed for an average of five days.

August Billings Index Bounces Back

National
Wednesday, September 21, 2011
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Billings (blue) and inquiries (red) for the past 12 months. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Billings (blue) and inquiries (red) for the past 12 months. (The Architect's Newspaper)

They’re back! Positive numbers for the Architecture Billings Index (ABI) jumped up in August to 51.4 from a dismal 45.1 in July where it had been stewing in negative land for months. (Anything over 50 indicates positive growth.) Together with a sharp rise as well in Project Inquiries to 56.9 (up from 53.7), the good news seems cautiously solid. “This turnaround in demand for design services is a surprise,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker. Regional averages, however, remained below the positive bar across the country indicating that firms generally are still struggling. These numbers predate the next injection of stimulus money—whatever shape it takes—which will be sure to give another jolt. Unless, of course, billings are tracking the roller-coaster antics of the stock market.

“The stock market is doing what the economy is doing which is not moving solidly in one direction, either way,” Baker said by phone. “The stop-start that we have seen over the past two years is going to stay with us. I would love to believe that these latest numbers are the start of a Grand Recovery. And maybe they are. The evidence is just not there yet to be sure.”

Check out the regional and sector breakdowns after the jump.

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