Help Decide Lego’s Next Architecture Model

International
Friday, December 2, 2011
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Will Habitat 67 be the next Lego Architecture Model? (Bill Dutfield)

Will Habitat 67 be the next Lego Architecture Model? (Bill Dutfield)

Lego is giving architecture fans the chance to vote for the next model in its Architecture Series. Among the expected architectural wonders, like the Coliseum and the Eiffel Tower, more modern choices include Foster and Partners’ 30 St. Mary’s Axe (aka The Gherkin), Moshe Safdie’s Habitat 67, and Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso. Current structures in the series—which began in the 60’s but was discontinued until recently— include Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, SOM’s Burj Khalifa, and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.

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a+i’s White Veil Wall: Ceilings Plus

Fabrikator
Friday, December 2, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

The screen spans the ceiling and the three-story atrium of a Midtown Manhattan office (Magda Biernat)

A custom-perforated screen balances lighting and privacy in a three-story New York office space.

Ceilings are not just for the ceiling anymore. “With architecture becoming more organic in shape, we are becoming the architecture, not just a ceiling or wall,” said Nancy Mercolino, the president of architectural ceiling, wall, and enclosure manufacturer Ceilings Plus. This fall, the company completed a 33-foot-tall painted aluminum feature wall at the Manhattan offices of a global investment management firm. Designed by New York-based a+i design corp, the project was a consolidation of the firm’s offices in the city, adding three floors to the company’s existing three-story office space in a Midtown building.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Researchers Develop Robot-Powered Flight Assembled Architecture

International
Thursday, December 1, 2011
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A robot placing a brick. (Courtesy Gramazio & Kohler and Raffaello D’Andrea with ETH Zurich)

A robot placing a brick. (Courtesy Gramazio & Kohler and Raffaello D’Andrea with ETH Zurich)

Finally, one of our classic futurist expectations (something you might see in Futurama) is about to be fulfilled: architecture assembled by a swarm of flying robots. With robots apparently planning a takeover of the construction industry, how long until the iconic yet dangerous “Lunch atop a Skyscraper” (from the 1930s) is a thing of the past?

Continue reading after the jump.

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Activists Press On for AIDS Memorial at Triangle Park

East, Newsletter
Thursday, December 1, 2011
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A view looking east through the Triangle Park plan by M. Paul Friedberg (courtesy Westside Healthcare Coalition)

A view looking east through the Triangle Park plan by M. Paul Friedberg and Partners. (courtesy Westside Healthcare Coalition)

On the eve of World AIDS Day, dozens crammed into the City Planning building in downtown Manhattan where the Rudin Organization presented plans for the former St. Vincent’s Hospital site at a Universal Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) hearing.  The commission is set to vote on the plan on January 24, but over the last few months yet another issue has emerged at the long contested site. Activists from the Queer History Alliance continue to press for an AIDS Memorial to be placed at a proposed park across the street from the former hospital, which was considered ground zero during the height of the AIDS crisis.

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Video> DDG’s Bluestone Clad 41 Bond

East
Wednesday, November 30, 2011
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Masons carved 41 Bond's bluestone in the backyard; nothing was prefabbed.

Masons carved 41 Bond's bluestone in the backyard; nothing was prefabbed.

DDG Partner’s latest project uses a material often found under foot and gives it a hard-earned respect long deserved. New York State bluestone clads the entirety of 41 Bond’s facade, a condo with four full floor units, a ground floor townhouse, a duplex, and a penthouse duplex. Over the past few months usual Bond Street soundscape of tires rumbling over cobblestone has been interrupted by the clangs of the quarry, as masons fit the stone into place. All of the stone carving was done on site. DDG’s CEO Joseph McMillan, Jr. and chief creative officer Peter Guthrie give AN a tour…

Watch the video after the jump

Mallorca Marvel: LA Architects Wrap Resort In Futuristic Seaweed

International, West
Wednesday, November 30, 2011
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The patterned facade will create dappled interior light (LH&E)

Yes, that is a waterfall running down the building (LH&E)
Los Angeles firm tec Architecture and Dutch interior designer Marcel Wanders are partnering to create Kameha Bay Portals, a luxury resort and spa in Mallorca, Spain set to open early in 2013. Located on the island’s posh south coast, the building will take shape out of a nondescript 1960’s concrete building, but according to tec Architecture the 55,000 square foot project is more a reinvention than a renovation.

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Unveiled> A BIG Glassy Box for Paris, Sort Of

International, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 29, 2011
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BIG's design for the University of Jussieu in Paris. (Courtesy BIG)

BIG's design for the University of Jussieu in Paris. (Courtesy BIG)

In Bjarke Ingels‘ traditional style, what started as a standard box of a building for Paris’ Université Pierre et Marie Curie has been lifted, bent, and deformed to maximize light, sight lines, and air flow for a cramped urban site. Ingels’ firm BIG and Paris-based OFF recently won won a competition to design the new multidisciplinary research center called Paris PARC to reunite the university’s campus with the surrounding city including Jean Nouvel’s adjacent Institut du Monde Arabe and the nearby Notre Dame Cathedral.

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In Chicago, Small and Steady May Win the Race

Midwest
Tuesday, November 29, 2011
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(photo: Steve Vance/flickr)

While a number of new rental towers have been announced in recent months, Crain’s has an informative article about a number of Chicago condominium developers who are beginning to build again, albeit at a very small scale and in tightly phased sequences. Even for projects as small as 14 units, banks are demanding projects be split into two phases, six units first, followed by eight in a second building. Some developers are also willing to accept lower offers from buyers for higher down payments up front. The thinking reflects new stricter lending standards and continuing economic uncertainty. But with Chicago’s condo market still over-saturated and the foreclosure crisis just beginning to wane, it also reflects a much needed correction from previous patterns of over building and over lending. And, pardon me Mr. Burnham, but isn’t incremental city-making and infill development often the best approach?

 

 

On View> Jürgen Mayer H. at the Art Institute of Chicago

Midwest
Tuesday, November 29, 2011
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Court of Justice in Hasselt, Belgium. (Courtesy AIC)

Court of Justice in Hasselt, Belgium. (Courtesy AIC)

Jürgen Mayer H.: Wirrwarr
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago
Through January 22, 2012

While the Berlin-based architect Jürgen Mayer H. is known for his highly sculptural, honeycomb-like buildings, such as the Metropol Parasol in Seville or the the Court of Justice in Hasselt, Belgium (above), one of his quirky obsessions is not as widely known: a fascination with secret codes and numbers encrypted into patterns. Used by institutions such as banks to ensure that sensitive information such as PINs and passwords are only visible to the recipient, these intricately patterned data sheets are largely unexamined. To Jürgen Mayer H., however, this visual expression of our fear of exposure and desire for protection is fascinating and relevant to architecture.

Continue reading after the jump.

Dreaming of Development at Brooklyn Bridge Park

East, Newsletter
Monday, November 28, 2011
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Proposal by FXFOWLE / Dermot.

Proposal by FXFOWLE / Dermot.

Last week, as New York was blindly transfixed on its impending Thanksgiving feast, the Brooklyn Bridge Park (BBP) released renderings of a proposed mixed-use development that has been floated to help fund the waterfront park. Seven proposals stacked, folded, and otherwise covered in plants a program calling for several hundred hotel rooms and residences on two park-side sites on Furman Street. The developer/architect breakdown was full of the regular big names and heavy hitters: Brooklyn’s Two Trees selected WASA/Studio AToll Brothers worked with Rogers Marvel; SDS worked with Leeser; Extell went with Beyer Blinder Belle; Dermot with FX Fowle; RAL with CDA; and Starwood teamed with Alloy Development, Bernheimer Architects, and n Architects.

Check out all the proposals after the jump.

Unveiled> SHoP’s Prefabulous Atlantic Yards

East
Wednesday, November 23, 2011
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Modular buildings surrounding Barclay's Arena at Atlantic Yards. (Courtesy SHoP)

Modular buildings surrounding Barclay's Arena at Atlantic Yards. (Courtesy SHoP)

From the twisting titanium forms of Frank Gehry’s Miss Brooklyn to a prefabricated tower of 17 unique modules, the proposed designs for Atlantic Yards run the gamut of the architectural spectrum. On November 17, Forest City Ratner and SHoP Architects confirmed rumors that the 22-acre project will house a collection of the world’s tallest prefabricated buildings, beginning with the 32-story B2 tower nestled alongside the Barclay’s Center on Flatbush Avenue and Dean Street.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Quick Clicks> Edible High Line, Urban Glaciers, Remembering Lutyens, Accidental Batteries

Daily Clicks
Wednesday, November 23, 2011
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DIY Edible High Line (Courtesy Inhabitat)

DIY Edible High Line (Via Inhabitat)

High Bento. For this year’s Thanksgiving dinner, Inhabitat thought up quite a creative centerpiece: an edible miniature High Line? It’s ingredients include, among others, good old mashed potatoes, stuffing, and cranberry sauce. For an additional garnish, simply add enoki mushroom people.

Valuing Education. The Center for an Urban Future is conducting a study on the economic and entrepreneurial importance of New York City’s design and architecture schools. They have set up a survey for practicing NYC architects to share their interactions with these schools, but hurry, the survey only runs through the end of the week. Take the survey here.

Ice Conditioned. Ulan Bator, the Mongolian capital, decided to adopt an ambitious, city-wide air conditioner: an artificial glacier. The $700,000 geoengineering project is expected to cool down the city during the summer while also supplying residents with water. More on The Guardian and The Atlantic.

Building New Delhi.  Jane Ridley, professor of history at the University of Buckingham and the great granddaughter of Edwin Lutyens, illuminates some of the personal struggles the celebrated architect faced while undertaking his greatest achievement, designing and building New Delhi. Read at the WSJ.

Geothermal + Batteries. Although lithium isn’t exactly rare—it’s the 25th most abundant element—society still faces challenges keeping up with the demand. According to Treehugger, we might have inadvertently stumbled on a solution.

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