The Twelve Days of Architecture.  The Twelve Days of ArchitectureWhile it doesn’t look like it’s going to be a white Christmas here in New York, we can still try to spread a little holiday cheer. Architect Jody Brown at the blog Coffee with an Architect has come up with a new carol, “The Twelve Days of Architecture.” Here’s a sample from day four: “On the Fourth day of Christmas,/ my Architect gave to me/ a four-sided building,/ Three French Curves,/ Two turtlenecks,/ And a study guide for the A.R.E.” Click on over to Coffee with an Architect to check out the entire song.

 

SHFT+ALT+DLT: December 23

Shft+Alt+Del
Friday, December 23, 2011
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SHFT+ALT+DLT

SHFT+ALT+DLT

Portuguese architect, curator, and writer Pedro Gadanho will join the Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Architecture and Design as a curator of contemporary architecture effective January 11. In addition to organizing exhibitions, Gadanho will supervise the annual Young Architect’s Program, which has recently expanded from New York to Rome and Chile. Read more details in AN‘s breaking news story.

In other museum news, James Cuno, the President and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, has taken on yet another Getty role: acting director of the Getty Museum. In addition to supervising all of the Getty’s various holdings, Cuno, the former director of the Art Institute of Chicago, will now be back in familiar territory, overseeing the museum following the resignation of acting director David Bomford.

Other West Coast shifts: Behnisch Architekten closes their Venice, CA office, while Oakland, California-based VDK Architects, which specializes in the Science & Technology market sector, has merged with the architecture and engineering practice Harley Ellis Devereaux.

More mergers back East:Electric Lighting Agencies and O’Blaney Rinker Associates are joining forces and combining their lighting and control system specification businesses in New York City.

Dwell magazine regrouped this fall following the departure of editor-in-chief Sam Grawe and also established a New York editorial outpost; executive editor Amanda Dameron was promoted to editor-in-chief and Alejandro Chavetta was bumped up from art director to creative director. Kelsey Keith departed Curbed NY to join Dwell as a New York-based senior editor.

LEAPfactory’s Gervasutti Refuge

Fabrikator
Friday, December 23, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

Installation of the Gervasutti Bivouac on the Mont Blanc range's Freboudze Glacier (LEAPfactory)

Built to withstand extreme weather conditions, the alpine pod explores new frontiers for prefabricated architecture

Climbers on the Freboudze glacier can now take refuge from the punishing terrain of the Italian Alps thanks to a new prefabricated shelter commissioned by Italian alpine club CAI Torino. The New Gervasutti Refuge, which cantilevers from the rocky landscape in front of the east face of the Mont Blanc Range’s Grandes Jorasses, was designed and fabricated by LEAPfactory, an Italian firm specializing in modular structures with low environmental impact.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> BIG Hits the Slopes Again with New Resort in Finland

International
Thursday, December 22, 2011
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Plaza (Courtesy BIG)

Plaza (Courtesy BIG)

It’s no mystery that Bjarke Ingels is a fan of mountains, but building craggy edifices hasn’t been enough for the Danish leader of BIG. Now Bjarke has unveiled his firm’s latest plans to incorporate “rooftop-skiing.” He previously proposed the Hafjell Mountain Hotel in Norway in 2007 and more recently an imperiled Waste-to-Energy Plant in Denmark that appears to have stalled. The Danish firm’s latest competition-winner is a 500,000-square-foot resort called Koutalaki Ski Village in the Lapland region of Finland, consisting of four landscaped buildings that double as ski slopes.

Continue reading after the jump.

MoMA Taps Pedro Gadanho as Curator of Contemporary Architecture

International, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, December 22, 2011
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Pedro Gandanho (David Farran/Courtesy MoMA).

Pedro Gadanho (David Farran/Courtesy MoMA).

The Museum of Modern Art has confirmed that the Portuguese architect, curator, and writer Pedro Gadanho will join  MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design as a curator of contemporary architecture.

According to MoMA’s release: “In his new role, Mr. Gadanho will be responsible for a broad portfolio that reinforces the Museum’s commitment, since 1932, to contemporary architecture. In addition to building the Museum’s holdings of contemporary architecture, he will oversee the annual Young Architects Program (YAP), co-organized with MoMA PS1, and the two-year-old YAP International Program in conjunction with the MAXXI in Rome and Constructo in Santiago, Chile; organize further exhibitions in the Museum’s “Issues in Contemporary Architecture” series; and develop larger scale exhibitions of contemporary architecture, including exhibitions that explore relationships between architecture and other contemporary art practices.”

Continue reading after the jump.

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Buildings = Energy at the Center for Architecture

East
Wednesday, December 21, 2011
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A design by Perkins and Will explores passive system choices of integrated photovoltaics at the bottom of windows and a reflective panel at the top to bounce light back into the building.

A design by Perkins+Will explores passive system choices through integrated photovoltaics at the bottom of windows and a reflective panel at the top to bounce light back into the building. Angled window panes help reduce solar heat gain. (Courtesy Perkins+Will)

Amidst the event saturated month of Archtober and the holiday hubbub that followed, the Center for Architecture‘s fall show, Buildings = Energy, got a bit lost in the shuffle. But there’s still time to check it out through January 12. Earlier this month Margaret O. Castillo took AN on a tour of the exhibit, the last under her tenure as AIANY chapter president. The show drives home several green points that Castillo has been hammering at all year, primarily the fact that buildings consume energy–a lot of it.  Eighty percent of greenhouse gas emissions come from buildings, and in New York City alone they use 94 percent of the power. The exhibit takes a holistic approach focusing on the amount of energy needed to extract and make materials, to the energy used to build, and the energy consumed by the completed structure.

Read More

Upward March: Billings Index Regains Positive Territory

National
Wednesday, December 21, 2011
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Billings (blue) and inquiries (red) for the past 12 months. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Billings (blue) and inquiries (red) for the past 12 months. (The Architect's Newspaper)

The Architecture Billings Index is up, hitting 52.0 in November, the first positive ground since touching 51 in August (anything over 50 indicates an increase in billings). The roller-coaster volatility of the past few months—we held our breath and skipped reporting September’s down and October’s up—suggests cautious optimism that the index which tracks the approximate nine-month lag time between architecture billings and construction spending is finally in a solid swing upwards.

Continue reading after the jump.

Proposed Light Installation Responds to Noise Pollution in Red Hook

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
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Silent Lights proposal (Courtesy Artist Build Collaborative).

Silent Lights proposal (Courtesy Artist Build Collaborative).

The Artists Build Collaborative is attempting to bring light and clarity to an area of Red Hook most notable for its darkness and confusion. The proposal, Silent Lights, is a system of interactive illuminated gates along a pedestrian path along Hamilton Avenue under the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. With a high concentration of both human and motor traffic in the area, the installation will respond to the surrounding vehicular cacophony by translating sound pollution into light, allowing the auditory experiencee to be both seen and heard.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Hollywood’s Field of Dreams? The Academy Plans an Amphitheater

West
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
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Rendering of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences' plan for an outdoor theater for screening classic films. (Courtesy AMPAS)

Rendering of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences' plan for an outdoor theater for screening classic films. (Courtesy AMPAS)

Now that it’s clear that Christian de Portzamparc’s Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Museum in Hollywood will not happen (the Academy will instead reimagine the old May Company building for the museum), the Academy recently shared its plans with the LA Times to build a new amphitheater and 17,000 square foot event space on the dead project’s land. The group purchased the 3.5-acre lot near the intersection of Vine Street and Fountain Avenue in 2005 for $50 million. According to the Times, the amphitheater (to be used, of course, to screen movies) will include a raised grassy area and will seat about 300 people. Plans call for a 10,000-square-foot patio adjacent to the amphitheater designed for special events. It looks like the space is probably temporary, as Academy President Tom Sherak said the Academy will keep the space until the site’s value climbs back to its 2005 level. On second thought, this amphitheater could be here a while.

St. Louis to I-70, Put A Lid On It

Midwest, Newsletter
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
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St. Louis will soon build a "lid" over I-70 to better connect the Arch with downtown.

The grounds surrounding the St. Louis Arch have long been cut off from downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods. One of the chief goals of the City+River+Arch competition was to improve connectivity. St. Louis recently received $20 million in federal TIGER III grants to build a lid over 1-70, one of the most important pieces of the Michael Van Valkenburgh-led redesign of the Arch grounds. The overall cost of the redesign is estimated at $578 million, so the grant is just a fraction of the overall funding needed. Still, it’s an important, early sign that this ambitious project is moving ahead.

 

Cornell Wins: Next Stop Roosevelt Island

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
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SOM's plan for Cornell's tech campus on Roosevelt Island.

SOM's plan for Cornell's tech campus on Roosevelt Island.

With his hand essentially forced by a hasty withdraw of Stanford on Friday, and the hugely enticing carrot of a $350 million gift from Duty-Free billionaire and Cornell alum Charles Feeney, Mayor Bloomberg announced on Monday that the Cornell team will be building the NYC Tech Campus on Roosevelt Island. The terms “game changer” and “transformative” were bandied about with regularity throughout the mayor’s midday press conference, which was streamed live on the net to the delight of Cornell’s partnering campus, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology. The Israeli students’ digitally lapsed cheering added a techy touch.

Read More

MAXXI & PS 1 announce shortlist for 2012 Young Architects Program in Rome.  WHATAMI by stARTT. (Cecilia Fiorenza / Courtesy MAXXI)The Italian website Tafter reports that the finalists are 6mu6 (Turin, Italy), Rural Boxx (Sacile, Italy), Urban Movement (New York, USA / Rome, Italy), and Yellow Office Yellow Office (Milan, Italy),  and a team composed of John A. Salvator Liotta, Matteo Belfiore with Taichi Kuma and Yuta Ito (Naples, Italy / Tokyo, Japan). The winner will be announced early in 2012, with the installation opening at the MAXXI in June simultaneously with New York’s YAP installation at MoMA PS 1. In bocca al lupo!

 

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