Architectural League Announces Young Architects Awards

National
Friday, April 20, 2012
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"CHROMAtex.me," bridgegallery, NYC, Photo: Alan R. Tansey, Michael Szivos, SOFTlab

"CHROMAtex.me," bridgegallery, NYC, Photo: Alan R. Tansey, Michael Szivos, SOFTlab

The results are in and the winners of the 31st annual Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers were announced on Friday. The recipients of the 2012 awards are: Jorge ArvizuIgnacio del RioEmmanuel Ramirez, and Diego Ricalde, MMX Studio, Mexico City; Jimenez Lai, Bureau Spectacular, Chicago; Sean Lally, WEATHERS / Sean Lally, Chicago; Seung Teak Lee and Mi Jung Lim, STPMJ, Brooklyn; Michael Szivos, SOFTlab, New York; and Koji Tsutsui, Koji Tsutsui & Associates, San Francisco and Tokyo. Formerly the Young Architects Forum, the League Prize is considered one of North America’s most prestigious awards for young architects.

View examples of the winners’ work after the jump.

Todd and Billie to Get Arty for the Big Green.  Todd and Billie to Get Arty for the Big Green Expect to be hear a lot about Todd Williams and Billie Tsien in the weeks and months to come. First up, their much anticipated (and highly controversial) new building for the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, which opens imminently. Second, the fate of their building for the American Folk Art Museum (now owned by MoMA) hangs in the balance, with Jean Nouvel’s tower looming on the horizon. Third comes the announcement that the pair will renovate and expand the Hood Art Museum at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. The project will include new and renovated galleries for Darmouth’s art collection, which dates to 1772.

 

On View> Robert Neffson’s Urban Landscapes

East
Friday, April 20, 2012
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Neffeson's painting of 57th Street with Skidmore Owings & Merrill's Number 9 building at left. (Courtesy Bernaducci Meisel)

Neffson's painting of 57th Street with Skidmore Owings & Merrill's Number 9 building at left. (Courtesy Bernaducci Meisel) (56x79 inches)

Until about the mid 20th century, there was a tradition for New York’s urban landscape painters to split time between New York and Paris. It was not uncommon for collectors to hang dual streetscapes side by side. It’s surprising then to see the digitally inflected work of Robert Neffson tweak the tradition for the 21st century. Neffson’s paintings of 57th Street and Notre Dame embrace a multimedia studio process for hyperrealistic results.

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Harvey Mudd College BubbleDeck Construction

Fabrikator
Friday, April 20, 2012
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
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Bubble deck installation (Boora Architects)

New learning center gives an in-progress look at lightweight structural design

Construction is underway on the first academic facility in almost two decades to be built on the Claremont, California, campus of Harvey Mudd College. Designed in 1956 by Edward Durrell Stone, the 39-acre school is a private engineering, science, and math institution, which is planning for growth in the coming decade.

“A lot of their current classrooms are underground so they were literally wanting to bring these into the light,” said Amy Donohue, a principal at Boora Architects. The Portland-based firm has designed a new 70,000-square-foot Teaching and Learning Center to create a bridge between academic facilities located to the west and dorms to the east. Though the design emphasizes transparency, energy efficiency, and a range of academic and social functions, a unique bi-axial hollow slab structural system concealed in the building’s concrete will have one of the greatest impacts on reducing material use as it targets LEED Platinum certification.

Continue reading after the jump.

Late Bloomr: Silver Lake Centerpiece Delayed

West
Thursday, April 19, 2012
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Rendering of "Bloomrs," planned as a future Silver Lake landmark (All That Is Solid)

Rendering of "Bloomrs," planned as a future Silver Lake landmark (All That Is Solid)

The building of a proposed neighborhood symbol on the corner of Sunset and Santa Monica Boulevards in Silver Lake has been pushed back due to lack of funds. After winning the Envisioning Silver Lake competition last summer, LA firm ALLTHATISSOLID (ATIS) has been working with the city’s Bureau of Street Services (BSS) to scale back and refine the design, called “Bloomrs,” to fit the $100,000 budget with room for curbing and other street improvements included. The saddle-shaped structure, made of Cor-ten steel, has already been re-designed to occupy a smaller footprint and rises to a shorter height.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Fred Sandback: Decades

East
Thursday, April 19, 2012
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(Adam Reich / Courtesy David Zwirner)

(Adam Reich / Courtesy David Zwirner)

Fred Sandback: Decades
David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street
Through April 21

The drawings and sculptures of Fred Sandback are the subject of a new exhibition at New York’s David Zwirner gallery. The projects are arranged by decades, representing distinct periods in the artist’s career, spanning the years 1969 to 2000. Sandback created minimalist sculptures out of simple materials in response to the architecture of specific interiors. Installations made from thin lengths of material redefine spaces, creating objects and planes by simply implying their outlines. On display are early works from the 1960s made of metal wire and cord, permutational works of the ’70s, and reliefs and site-specific projects from his late career. Drawings are included, like 16 Variationen von 2 Diagonalen Linien 1972 (above), plus the Zwirner gallery has reconstructed the interiors of Galerie Heiner Friedrich, the Munich space for which many of Sandback’s works were designed. A rare copper wire sculpture, Proposal for Heiner Friedrich, Munich, Six Rectangles, Copper Wire (Sculptural Study), spans three rooms and is a highlight of the show.

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Video> Ben & Jane Thompson Tour Seaport, circa 1981

East, Newsletter
Thursday, April 19, 2012
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The video shows the bad old days before the Thompson plan for the seaport was complete.

While combing the web for info on the early days of the South Street Seaport‘s Pier  17AN came across a Youtube video of Ben & Jane Thompson discussing plans for redeveloping the upland and the piers near Fulton Fish Market.  The short video, circa 1981, certainly puts the current debate on SHoP’s new design into historical focus, particularly when Ben Thompson speaks of retaining the now long gone market.

Watch the video after the jump

Event> Eventually Everything: The 2012 D-Crit Conference May 2

East
Wednesday, April 18, 2012
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Eventually Everything D-Crit Conference May 2

Eventually Everything D-Crit Conference May 2

Eventually Everything: The 2012 D-Crit Conference
Wednesday, May 2, 12:30–7:00 p.m.
Visual Arts Theatre
333 West 23rd Street
No charge for admission; Registration required

On May 2 the School of Visual Arts Design Criticism MFA program, a.k.a. D-Crit, presents its third annual thesis conference, and this year’s line-up promises to be intriguing, covering an array of subjects–”Main Street, USA and the Power of Myth,” “Graphic Ornament in Interior Architecture,” “Towers to Town Homes: Public Housing, Policy, and Design in the US” to “Missing the Modern Gun: Object Ethics in Collections of Design,” to name a few. The list of thesis topics alone makes a statement about the possibilities of design criticism and how D-Crit aims to push its limits.

Continue reading after the jump.

Live Chat: So What Is Green, Anyway?

National
Wednesday, April 18, 2012
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Welcome to AN‘s live Facebook Live Stream chat on sustainability which took place on Wednesday, April 18 from 3:00 until 4:00 p.m. EST. “What is Green, Anyway” covered what exactly makes a project green, how effective green standards are, how sustainability is driving design (and whether it should), and where green design is heading. AN’s West Coast Editor Sam Lubell was joined by Angela Brooks, partner at Brooks + Scarpa, John Stein, president of Kirei, a green materials company, and Eric Corey Freed, principal at organicARCHITECTURE to discuss the issues and take your questions.

Thanks to everyone who stopped by and joined the discussion! (And don’t forget to like AN’s Facebook page to stay up-to-date with the latest architecture and design news.) Special thanks as well to our panel of experts.

Chat record & info about the experts after the jump.

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Big Bucks for Big Dredge.  A $250 million influx will make way for ever-larger cargo vessels. As we reported yesterday, New York’s Vision2020 plan is well on its way toward becoming a legal reality. Mayor Bloomberg has now backed up the plan with substantial infrastructure. Together with Port Authority Director Patrick Foye, the mayor today announced a $250 million economic development package to facilitate dredging the Harbor and dropping the water main that runs from Brooklyn to Staten Island to 100 feet underground. The deeper channels will accommodate the mega cargo ships that fit through the expanded Panama canal that will be completed in 2014. The next generation of boats are about double the size of todays ships.

 

South Street Seaport Preservationistas: Oh no! PoMo Don’t Go!

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, April 18, 2012
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Detail of the model presented by SHoP at yesterday's Landmarks hearing. (AN/Stoelker)

Detail of the Pier 17 model presented by SHoP at yesterday's Landmarks hearing. (AN/Stoelker)

The PoMo aficionados were out in force at yesterday’s Landmarks Preservation hearing for the new proposal for South Street Seaport’s Pier 17. It would seem that just as debate on the value of 1970s Brutalism shifts into high gear, the 1980s PoMo crowd is revving its engines. As preservationists and developers whacked it out, some larger questions about context and neighborhood integration arose.

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Redesigning the National Mall: Union Square

East
Wednesday, April 18, 2012
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Snohetta & AECOM

Snohetta & AECOM

[Editor's Note: Following the unveiling of proposals to redesign the National Mall, AN will be running a three-part series to display the proposals for each of the three segments of the Mall: Constitution Gardens, Union Square, and the Washington Monument Grounds.]

Even for most Washingtonians, the name “Union Square” evokes a place in New York City. But the National Mall Plan of 2010 calls for this disconnected, little-used area—which has a reflecting pool and large equestrian statue of Ulysses S. Grant on the west front of the U.S. Capitol—to become a prime site for demonstrations and other large gatherings, thereby relieving some of the strain on the Mall. (The Mall receives 25 million visitors per year.)

Recently, control of the square passed from the National Park Service to the Architect of the Capitol, raising doubts about how a renovation would proceed. The National Mall Design Competition is organized by the Trust for the National Mall, a private organization that partners with the National Park Service.

Check out all four finalist proposals after the jump.

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