Victory in Round 3 for Los Angeles’ MyFigueroa Streetscape Project

A recent compromise among stakeholders means that the project can now move forward. (Courtesy MyFigueroa)

A recent compromise among stakeholders means that the project can now move forward. (Courtesy MyFigueroa)

After four years of stops and starts, MyFigueroa, the $20 million proposal to transform Los Angeles’ Figueroa Corridor from a regional throughway to a bike- and pedestrian-friendly destination, appears to be moving ahead. Overseen by the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) with design assistance from Melendrez, Troller Mayer Associates, and Gehl Architects, MyFigueroa will add separated cycle tracks or buffered bike lanes, bike racks, and improved transit shelters, lighting, and landscaping to 4.5 miles of streets between LA Live and Exposition Park.

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On View> Sopheap Pich: A Room at the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Art, Midwest, On View
Wednesday, July 2, 2014
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(Eric Lubrick/Courtesy Sopheap Pich)

(Eric Lubrick/Courtesy Sopheap Pich)

Sopheap Pich: A Room
Indianapolis Museum of Art
4000 Michigan Road
Indianapolis, Indiana
Through August 24

Among the currently running exhibitions in the Indianapolis Museum of Art is a bamboo installation that embodies the essence and culture of Cambodia. Entitled A Room, this brainchild of acclaimed Cambodian contemporary artist Sopheap Pich furnishes the Efroymson Family Entrance with approximately 1,200 bamboo strips. The bamboo strips, both natural and artificial, are arranged into a circular curtain that extends 40 feet from the floor to its peak. The area inside the bamboo curtain measures 26 feet in diameter and is illuminated by natural light filtered through or between the bamboo pieces, making it an ideal location for visitors to meditate. Pich is distinguished by his consistent use of bamboo and rattan strips in his art installations. In this particular case, the light coming through the bamboo strips emulates the sensation of standing in a bamboo forest in Cambodia.

Alexander Gorlin Wraps Supportive Housing in a Binary Skin

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Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

Located in the Bronx, The Brook provides housing and support services for the formerly homeless and individuals living with HIV/AIDS. (Courtesy Alexander Gorlin Architects)

An aluminum rain screen and locally-sourced brick articulate a two-part program.

The Brook, developed by Common Ground and designed by Alexander Gorlin Architects, is part of a new wave of affordable housing communities popping up all over the United States. Unlike the public housing projects of the mid-twentieth century, which focused exclusively on housing and tended to suffer from a lack of routine maintenance, The Brook, located in the Bronx, combines apartments and support services under one roof. This duality is manifested in the envelope’s contrasting material palette—dark grey brick for the residential spaces, raw aluminum over the community facilities. “The idea of the exterior was to symbolize, as well as reflect, the internal program of Common Ground as supportive housing,” said Alexander Gorlin. “It’s inspired in part by Le Corbusier and his idea of expressing the program on the facade, and expressing the public functions as a means of interrupting a repetitive facade.” Read More

SHoP Architects Designing Brooklyn’s Newest, Tallest Tower

The site of SHoP's future tower, next to the City Point development.

The site of SHoP’s future tower, next to the City Point development.

SHoP Architects has racked up another major project in Brooklyn. The firm behind the Barclays Center and the Domino Sugar Factory redevelopment, is designing Brooklyn’s newest, tallest tower. NY YIMBY spotted building permits for 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension in Downtown Brooklyn, where the firm’s 775-foot-tall, 495-unit building will rise.

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On View> No Further West: The Story of Los Angeles Union Station

(Courtesy Getty Research Institute)

(Courtesy Getty Research Institute)

No Further West: The Story of Los Angeles Union Station
Los Angeles Public Library, Central Library
630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA
Through August 10

Known as the “Last of the Great Railway Stations,” Los Angeles Union Station receives due recognition with the exhibition entitled No Further West: The Story of Los Angeles Union Station. Organized by the Getty Research Institute, the exhibition will span from the station’s construction in 1939, when its construction became an incidental platform for racial issues of the era, to today, when it serves 60,000 commuter passengers daily. Photographs, architectural drawings, and other archival items will all relay the story of the station’s journey from a basic transportation hub to an important centerpiece of Southern California architecture. The Los Angeles Public Library—an iconic cultural centerpiece itself—hosts the exhibition until August 10.

Another of Los Angeles’ Famed Googie Diners, Pepy’s Galley, Closes For Good

Pepy's Exterior (Russell Fortmeyer)

Pepy’s quirky exterior (Russell Fortmeyer)

Long-time Mar Vista Lanes diner, Pepy’s Galley, an iconic, authentically Googie-style restaurant, closed its doors forever on Monday. By most accounts, the interior will be a total loss, as the building’s new owner, BowlmorAMF, intends to convert Pepy’s into a catering space for the adjacent bowling alley. The Mar Vista Lanes complex was designed by famed architects Armet & Davis, a seminal Los Angeles firm also known for Pann’s and the original Norm’s restaurant.

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Amtrak to Launch Bike Storage Cars on Long-Distance Trains

The new bike racks. (Courtesy Amtrak)

The new bike racks. (Courtesy Amtrak)

Among the appeals of train travel is the ability to move between urban city centers easily, but until now, bringing your bike along for the ride was a burdensome venture. Well, good news cyclists. Amtrak is making it a whole lot easier to bring your bike aboard its trains. Gone are the days of having to break down your bike, pack it into a box, and stow it with luggage. The train operator is set to launch new storage cars that include bike racks.

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Video Sneak Peek: facades+ Chicago, July 24-25

Like our skin, a building’s facade is a critical intermediary between its interior functions and the outside environment. High-performance envelope design thus incorporates a variety of concerns, from aesthetics to sustainability. Next month, leading AEC industry professionals will gather in the Windy City for facades+ Chicago to discuss the future of facade design through the lens of the conference theme: resilience. For more information or to register, visit the facades+ Chicago website.

Dog House: World’s Largest Dog Park, Psychology Center Could Be Built Near Los Angeles

Eavesdroplet, West
Monday, June 30, 2014
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Around the Santa Clarita compound. (Courtesy Cesar's Way)

Around the Santa Clarita compound. (Courtesy Cesar’s Way)

In one of AN‘s many visits to offices around the West Coast we recently stumbled upon a true gem. Apparently the dog whisperer, Cesar Milan, is hoping to build an estate for himself in Santa Clarita, north of Los Angeles, that would include the world’s largest dog park, a home for his foundation, the Dog Psychology Center, a dog track for training rescued dogs, and villas for pet owners to stay when they’re treating their dogs. The project is still seeking funding, but well keep you posted if this one gets its, ahem, legs.

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Brad Pitt’s Make It Right Foundation to build sustainable homes for Native Americans

GRAFT-home-design (Courtesy GRAFT)

GRAFT-home-design (Courtesy GRAFT)

Brad Pitt’s home-building operation, Make It Right, was initially established in 2007 to rebuild homes in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward after Hurricane Katrina. The non-profit has built dozens of starchitect-designed houses in New Orleans and a subsequent expansion to Kansas City, near where the actor grew up. Now the organization has taken up its latest charitable challenge: the construction of several sustainable housing developments in Fort Peck, Montana for a Native American tribe there.

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Finally, Los Angeles moving ahead with rail connection to LAX

Staff rendering of proposed 96th street station (METRO)

Staff rendering of proposed 96th street station (METRO)

At long last, it appears Los Angeles is getting its train to the airport. Last week, the board of LA County’s transit agency, METRO, agreed to proceed with a $200-million light-rail station, part of the new Crenshaw Line, connecting to a proposed people mover that will usher passengers to their terminals. The new station would be located about a mile and a half east of LAX’s central terminal area, and about a half mile north of the Crenshaw Line’s Aviation/ Century Stop,  at 96th Street and Aviation Boulevard.

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On View> California Science Center presents “Pompeii: The Exhibition”

On View, West
Monday, June 30, 2014
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Pompeii-Statue

(Soprintendenza per I Beni Archeologici de Napoli)

Pompeii: The Exhibition
California Science Center
700 Exposition Park Drive, Los Angeles, CA
Through January 4, 2015

Before its destruction, Pompeii was one of the most vibrant and modern cities of its time. Now on display at the California Science Center, Pompeii: the Exhibition is a full-scale display of over 150 artifacts that illuminate the city’s cultural import. On loan from the Naples National Archeological Museum are garden frescoes, marble statues, and religious altars and shrines.

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