Parklet Down! Motorist Rams Downtown Los Angeles’ First Parklet

la-parklet-destroyed

The scene. (oneironaut11 / Instagram via LAist)

It seems like just yesterday that Los Angeles opened its first downtown Parklet, a sparkling new design on Spring Street by architects utopiad.org, designers Berry and Linné, and builders Hensel Phelps. But a few weeks ago that design (already getting a little shabby from weather and use) was rammed and badly compromised by an errant motorist, leaving it closed, and leaving downtown without a parklet to speak of more than two years after the city’s parklet program began.

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SOFTlab creates a flowery vortex for a New York City couture shoe shop

Melissa We Are Flowers (Courtesy SOFTlab)

Melissa We Are Flowers (Alan Tansey Photographer / Courtesy SOFTlab)

Forget about the Sharknado, New York–based designers at SOFTlab have created a vortex of flowers that has taken over one Manhattan shoe store, bringing SOFTlab’s signature parametric forms to the modern shoe brand, Melissa. The Soho store already grabbed design headlines when it opened its flagship location decked out in a custom-fabricated Corian interior by architecture firm Eight and Associated Fabrication. This latest design intervention is part of Melissa’s “We Are Flowers” campaign that used organic shapes and colors to inform its shoe line.

Continue reading after the jump.

Department of Buildings Approves Aby Rosen’s Plans for 67 Vestry

67 Vestry in Tribeca. (Courtesy CARLOS CHIOSSONE)

67 Vestry in Tribeca. (Courtesy CARLOS CHIOSSONE)

In yet another round of preservationist vs. developer, it appears developer has won again. This time, the fight took place at 67 Vestry Street in Tribeca—the site of an 11-story palazzo building that came to life as a warehouse for the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company in 1897. 

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Eavesdrop> Tettamant Booted: Could Dallas’ Nasher Sculpture Center Get a Sunlight Reprieve?

(Courtesy Nasher Sculpture Center)

(Courtesy Nasher Sculpture Center)

Thirty-four months have gone by since the Scott Johnson–designed Museum Tower hove into view and the Nasher Sculpture Center is still, er, gnashing its teeth. Every afternoon at around three o’clock glaring sunlight reflects off of the condo’s mirror like glass curtain wall, invading the Renzo Piano–designed skylit galleries, burning holes in the lawn, defoliating the trees, and no doubt increasing the air conditioning bill. Thirty-four months and nothing has been done to make it right, until June.

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Neutra and Alexander’s Orange Coast College buildings facing threat

Neutra and Alexander's Business Education Building (Les Katow)

Neutra and Alexander’s Business Education Building (Les Katow)

Here at AN we’ve seen our share of Richard Neutra tear downs in recent years. The latest possible victim is Neutra and Robert Alexander’s campus-wide buildings at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, which are being threatened by the school’s bond-supported Vision 2020 plan (pdf). If the plan passes the school could tear down the duo’s classrooms, library, business education building, and science wing, as well as extensive landscaping by famed landscape architect Garrett Eckbo, in favor of new buildings, an Urban Street, and a Grand Lawn. The undertaking would be largely funded by 2012’s $698 million Bond Measure R, and total about 250,000 square feet of new construction.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bittertang Farms’ organic amphitheater sprouts from straw in Lake Forest, Illinois

Buru Buru amphitheatre at the Ragdale Ring in Lake Forest, Illinois. (Bittertang Farms)

Buru Buru amphitheatre at the Ragdale Ring in Lake Forest, Illinois. (Bittertang Farms)

Work wrapped up this summer on Bittertang Farms’ installation at Ragdale, the nonprofit artists’ community in Chicago’s North Shore suburbs, and true to its plans the straw amphitheater springs forth from a lush hillside in Lake Forest, Illinois.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City and Investors Make Multi-Million Dollar Bet on Sunset Park in Brooklyn

The Brooklyn Army Terminal. (Flickr / Der_Krampus)

The Brooklyn Army Terminal. (Flickr / Der_Krampus)

With tens of millions of dollars, New York City hopes to jumpstart a transformation of Brooklyn’s Sunset Park neighborhood into a hub for artists and tech companies. As the Wall Street Journal reported, the city is spending $100 million to transform part of the Brooklyn Army Terminal—an old navy-supply hub—into space for light manufacturing. That investment is just one piece of the millions of dollars flowing into the neighborhood from real estate investors.

While the money will be significant, giving new life to Sunset Park’s industrial corridor will take more than artisanal pickles and startups. It will take great public space and significant improvements to the neighborhood’s streetscape. At this point, however, it’s not clear if that type of investment is in the cards.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gensler Goes Hollywood with “Vertical Campus”

The 14-story Icon at Sunset Boulevard will house office space for creative and entertainment professionals. (Courtesy Gensler)

The 14-story Icon at Sunset Boulevard will house office space for creative and entertainment professionals. (Courtesy Gensler)

Hudson Pacific Properties is banking on the continued appeal of Hollywood office space with its Icon at Sunset Bronson Studios, a 14-story tower designed by Gensler. Targeting creative professionals, Icon reconfigured the suburban campus typology for an urban setting. Gensler associate Amy Pokawatana called the development a “vertical campus,” blending “work, relaxation, and recreation.” Part of a $150 million studio expansion, the project takes its cue from a six-story building the developer finished on the Sunset Gower Studios lot in 2008.  Read More

Bomb Trains: Vice investigates the dangers of transporting crude oil by rail

After an oil train exploded in Lac Megantic, Quebec last year. (Flickr / EliasSchewel)

After an oil train exploded in Lac Megantic, Quebec last year. (Flickr / EliasSchewel)

In a new video report, Bomb Trains: The Crude Gamble of Oil by Rail, Vice News investigated the risk of crude oil–carrying trains exploding as they crisscross North America. That isn’t some hypothetical risk that could be realized down the road—it’s already happening. Last summer, forty-seven people were killed when an oil-carrying train exploded in a small town in Quebec, and in the year since, four more trains have gone up in flames in the U.S. and Canada. With so many train lines carrying oil through the hearts of American cities, Vice highlights safety concerns for urban areas and rural alike.

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Design Trust For Public Space Announces Winners of its Public Space Competition

Awards, City Terrain, Urbanism
Thursday, July 31, 2014
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THE ENERGETIC CITY. (COURTESY DEUTSCH NY)

THE ENERGETIC CITY. (COURTESY DEUTSCH NY)

Last night, AN was over at the National Museum of the American Indian in Lower Manhattan, to hear the Design Trust for Public Space announce the winners of  Energetic City: Connectivity in the Public Realm—its open call for proposals to reimagine the city’s public space. Out of over 90 submissions that came from individuals, city agencies, and community groups, the jury selected four winning plans that should collectively include programming in all five boroughs.

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Nemaworkshop’s new interiors create mystery and intrigue at the W Mexico City

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W Mexico City (Courtesy nemaworkshop)

Mexico City‘s posh Polanco neighborhood is now home to the recently redesigned Living Rooms of the W Mexico City. Part of a larger $100 million campaign to update its hotels across North America, the W asked New York City–based nemaworkshop, a firm that has been known to—quite literally—turn design on its head, to bring a sense of mystery and illusion to the hotel’s common spaces.

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Port Authority asks store to stop selling merchandise with New York City skyline

The Twin Towers printed on Fishs Eddy's "212" collection. (Courtesy Fishs Eddy)

The Twin Towers printed on Fishs Eddy’s “212” collection. (Courtesy Fishs Eddy)

In what may or may not be performance art, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey—an organization charged with overseeing the region’s bridges, tunnels, and airports—recently told Fishs Eddy—a small home goods store in Manhattan—that printing a pre-9/11 New York City skyline rendered in cartoon-like drawings on its merchandise was of “great concern.” Specifically, the authority would like the store to immediately stop selling all mugs, plates, bowls, and dish towels that depict any of its “assets” including the Twin Towers, One World Trade Center, and even the tunnels Holland and Lincoln.

Continue reading after the jump.

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