Q&A> Shigeru Ban, The 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate

International, News, Newsletter
Monday, March 24, 2014
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Cardboard Cathedral. (Stephen Goodenough)

Cardboard Cathedral. (Stephen Goodenough)

The Pritzker Architecture Prize has named Shigeru Ban its 2014 laureate. AN executive editor Alan G. Brake sat down with Ban at the Metal Shutter Houses, a luxury apartment building he designed in Manhattan’s Chelsea gallery district. He discussed influences from California to Finland, the social role of architecture, and what the recognition means for his work.

As a former Pritzker juror did you ever expect to be in the position of being a laureate yourself?
Not this soon. Also I know I have not made such achievements yet compared to other laureates, so I was not expecting it at all.

Continue reading after the jump.

Elizabeth Duffy, Apartment 2B by Susan Morris

East, On View
Monday, March 24, 2014
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(Courtesy dm contemporary NYC)

(Courtesy dm contemporary NYC)

 

Elizabeth Duffy & Cheryl Yun: Apartment 2B
dm contemporary NYC
39 East 29th Street, 2nd Floor
New York
Ended March 15, 2014

On the 2nd floor of a luxury 34-story highrise between Madison & Park avenues designed by architect H. Thomas O’Hara is a gallery called dm contemporary NYC. Although the gallery is located in an apartment, it is usually a white-walled exhibition space without the trappings of a domicile, save for the kitchen island. Artists Elizabeth Duffy and Cheryl Yun decided to transform the space back into a domestic environment with a twist for her recent exhibition Apartment 2B.

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High time for a High Line: Sydney Breaks Ground on New Elevated Park

Following it’s opening in 2009, urban planners all over the world have been keen on acquiring their own versions of New York’s much-lauded High Line. Sydney is the latest city to enter the fray, selecting a 500-meter stretch of abandoned railway as a foundation for the Goods Line, an urban park and public space, replete with bike paths, study pods and outdoor workspaces catering to local students.

Many more images after the jump.

Chicago’s ‘Green Healthy Neighborhoods’ plan moves forward

concepts for Chicago's Green Healthy Neighborhoods plan. (City of Chicago)

concepts for Chicago’s Green Healthy Neighborhoods plan. (City of Chicago)

Chicago’s plan to revitalize troubled South Side neighborhoods with green infrastructure, urban farming and transit-friendly development is moving ahead.

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Joseph Eichler’s Mid-Century Homes Reborn in Palm Springs

Realtor Monique Lombardelli purchased the rights to 65 original Joseph Eichler plans. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

Realtor Monique Lombardelli purchased the rights to 65 original Joseph Eichler plans. (Thomas Sylvia of Modern Homes Realty)

A few years ago, Realtor Monique Lombardelli fell in love with the work of Joseph Eichler, the developer whose architect-designed tract homes proliferated throughout Northern and Southern California in the decades following World War II. “[The Eichler homes] provide such a great environment, more of a relaxing, open feel,” she said. Lombardelli’s passion led her to produce a documentary on Eichler’s legacy, which in turn piqued her clients’ interest. “I started getting a lot of clients who wanted one, and there wasn’t anything to show them,” said Lombardelli. “Then I sold one that was a remodel, and everyone said, ‘I want an Eichler.’”

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On View> “Focus: Fred Tomaselli” at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth ends Sunday

Art, On View, Southwest
Friday, March 21, 2014
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(Courtesy Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth)

(Courtesy Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth)

FOCUS: Fred Tomaselli
Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth
3200 Darnell Street, Fort Worth
Through March 23, 2014

FOCUS: Fred Tomaselli highlights works created by the artist in the past ten years, including his New York Times collages. Tomaselli is known for his work on wood panels where he combines unorthodox materials that are suspended in a thick layer of clear, epoxy resin. The materials used in these pieces range from field guides to marijuana leaves. In Tomaselli’s hands, they form a hybrid of subjects and cultural references. The artist tries to represent the transcendental and utopian capabilities available within art. His work comments on suburbia in the 1960s and 70s and the quest for escapism. The images that are depicted relate to his California upbringing during those decades. Of his work, Tomaselli said, “It is my ultimate aim to seduce and transport the viewer into the space of these pictures while simultaneously revealing the mechanics of that seduction.”

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Teenager Climbs to the Top of the World Trade Center

East, Media, Skyscrapers
Friday, March 21, 2014
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The view from the top. (Courtesy Time)

The view from the top. (Courtesy Time)

In a story that’s equal parts Spy Kids and Man On Wire, a New Jersey teenager climbed to the top of World Trade Center on Sunday because… YOLO? The New York Post reported that the 16-year-old climbed through a construction gate a Ground Zero and got into an elevator at the World Trade Center where a friendly (confused?) construction worker took him up 88 flights. He then got out, climbed up the remaining 16 flights, snuck past a sleeping security guard, and hung out for two hours atop the tallest tower in America.

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Campaign Seeks to Ease New York’s Traffic, Build Transit With New Tolling Structure

New York City traffic. (Courtesy Flickr / Gregg Sloan)

New York City traffic. (Courtesy Flickr / Gregg Sloan)

Manhattan has a traffic problem. But, as of now, New York City has only taken marginal steps to fix it. To some, charging tolls on certain bridges and tunnels leading to the island, but not on others is uneven or unfair. To former New York traffic commissioner, “Gridlock” Sam Schwartz, however, it’s “a cockamamie system of charging people that makes absolutely no sense.” And today, Schwartz and Move NY are launching a campaign against that “cockamamie system” as they call for new strategies to ease congestion.

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Construction Underway at Norman Foster’s 610 Lexington Avenue Tower

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Norman Foster has broken ground on a skinny residential tower in Midtown Manhattan. Situated adjacent to the 1958 Seagram Building on the site of a former YWCA, Foster + Partners‘ 61-story white luxury tower at 610 Lexington Avenue will dwarf Mies van der Rohe’s 38-story bronze-clad landmark.

“It’s not simply about our new building, but about the composition it creates together with one of the 20th century’s greatest,” said Foster + Partners’ Chris Connell in a statement. “In contrast to Seagram’s dark bronze, our tower will have a pure white, undulating skin. Its proportions are almost impossibly slim and the views will be just incredible.”

Construction of Chicago Riverwalk Underway; City Looks at Funding Options

Chicago riverwalk (Courtesy Sasaki Associates)

Chicago riverwalk (Courtesy Sasaki Associates)

Chicago’s Riverwalk extension is underway, and the city is looking for contractors to help plan and operate concessions along what promises to be a major downtown attraction. Applicants have until April 7 to reply to the city’s request for qualifications. Read More

De Blasio To Tap Mitchell Silver for New York City Parks Commissioner

Mitchell Silver. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

Mitchell Silver. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to announce that Mitchell Silver—chief planning and development director in Raleigh, NC—will be New York’s next Parks Commissioner. According to the New York Times, “While Mr. Silver has worked in North Carolina since 2005, he has deep roots in New York. He went to high school in Brooklyn and earned a bachelor’s degree from Pratt Institute and a master’s degree in urban planning from Hunter College.”

Wilson recently served as the president of the American Planning Association, and in the 1980s worked in the New York City Planning Department. With Wilson’s extensive planning experience, he would seem to be a natural fit to lead City Planning rather than parks—and he reportedly was considered for that post before Carl Weisbrod was selected. This has been a much-anticipated announcement, as the Parks Department as been without a head since de Blasio took office nearly three months ago.

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University of Michigan plans $28 million architecture building expansion

Dean's List, Midwest
Friday, March 21, 2014
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Alfred Taubman with University of Michigan's Taubman Scholars. (University of MIchigan)

Alfred Taubman with University of Michigan’s Taubman Scholars. (Courtesy University of Michigan)

Five years ago, the University of Michigan shelved its plans to expand its Art and Architecture Building. Now, a bit further along on the country’s economic recovery, the University said this week it would build a $28 million addition.

Continue reading after the jump.

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