A Game of Cat’s Cradle with yo_cy

Fabrikator
Friday, April 19, 2013
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Fabrikator
Cast Thicket is the winning submission of the APPLIED: Research through Fabrication competition.

Cast Thicket is the winning submission of the APPLIED: Research through Fabrication competition. (Kevin McClellan)

Kenneth Tracy and Christine Yogiaman of yo_cy applied research from working with concrete to dispel the singular material tendency of digital fabrication.

Out of 68 submissions from 17 countries across four continents, the winning proposal of Tex-Fab’s APPLIED: Research through Fabrication competition at the University of Texas at Arlington came from Kenneth Tracy and Christine Yogiaman of yo_cy, a collaborative design studio that utilizes digital techniques for maximum design effect. Their winning idea is called Cast Thicket, a study in tensile concrete that takes off in variations like a game of Cat’s Cradle.

“The initial idea was to apply our research toward the competition,” said Tracy. The designers used their experience with an Indonesian material called bilik—a soft, woven bamboo mat typically used as a vertical divider—that helped form a fabric, cast concrete wall for a residential project in Southeast Asia. “We wanted to make something from a construction material that is normally very heavy looking [and] invert the stereotype of the carved aesthetics of concrete to create something that is lacy, thin, and delicate.” Read More

Photo of the Day: Amazing View From One World Trade

East
Thursday, April 18, 2013
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View from the top of One World Trade Center. (Courtesy Port Authority)

View from the top of One World Trade Center. (Courtesy Port Authority)

A couple weeks ago, we took a look at the trippy designs of the newly unveiled observation deck for Lower Manhattan’s One World Trade tower, rapidly adding to its antenna that will take the building to 1,776 feet. But while those renderings were long on the multimedia-rich halls that will presumably be filled with long lines waiting to get to the top, the big unveil was a bit short on the actual view. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has corrected that, however, posting a new photo taken from the very top of the tower, and we’re not disappointed. Note that Cass Gilbert’s 1913 Woolworth Building, appearing as just another tower in the center of the photo, was once the world’s tallest until 1930. See you in line for the view in person!

Preservationists Warn Russia’s Melnikov House at Risk

International
Thursday, April 18, 2013
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(Courtesy Docomomo)

(Courtesy Docomomo)

One of Moscow’s most iconic pieces of architecture, the cylindrical home of avant-garde architect Konstantin Melnikov built in the 1920s, is reportedly showing signs of structural damage caused by rumbling from neighboring construction projects and is in danger of being demolished. The New York Times reports that preservationists including Docomomo have sounded the alarm that cracks have been forming in the structure and its foundation. Russian preservation group Archnadzor has filed an appeal to President Vladimir Putin in an effort to save the structure from potential collapse.

Continue reading after the jump.

3D Printing Guru Skylar Tibbits To Lead DesignX Workshop at ICFF, May 21

East
Thursday, April 18, 2013
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Ted Fellow Skyler Tibbits is an architect and computer scientist whose work focuses on self-assembly technologies. (Courtesy SJET)

Ted Fellow Skyler Tibbits is an architect and computer scientist whose work focuses on self-assembly technologies. (Courtesy SJET)

It’s not science fiction. One day, buildings may build themselves. Enter the world of Senior TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits, where “matter programmers” design the characteristics of materials that self-assemble when exposed to air, water, or temperature changes. Join Tibbits on May 21 at a DesignX ICFF workshop for a hands-on lab that will introduce designers to the future of additive manufacturing and programmable matter.

The Shortlist> AN’s Editors Pick Five Competitions of the Week

National
Thursday, April 18, 2013
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SOCIALIGHT Competition Photo

SOCIALIGHT Competition Photo.

Are you eager to put your architectural design skills to the test?  Here are some exciting upcoming competitions that will be sure to present you with the type of challenge you’ve been waiting for. AN‘s editors have combed through our online listing of architecture and design competitions to bring you five of the most interesting competitions happening right now. If you’d like your competition to be included in the listing, please submit it here.

SOCIALIGHT. The Concept Lumière Urbaine invites architects, landscape architects, and urban planners to re-imagine the future role of lighting in urban neighborhoods.  The foundation encourages participants to think beyond the practical use of lighting (security, traffic, and signaling) and consider the way that light can affect the emotions and experiences of the residents of a city.

Registration Deadline: September 12, 2013
Submission Deadline: September 13, 2013

Continue reading after the jump.

Architecture Students To Build A Wind & Solar-Powered Radio Station in Kenya

Dean's List, East, International
Thursday, April 18, 2013
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africa_arch_01

Jonathan Dessi-Olive with the first arch of his timbrel vault prototype. (Courtesy PennDesign Team)

University of Pennsylvania architecture student Jonathan Dessi-Olive, this year’s winner of the Robert A.M. Stern Architects (RAMSA) Travel Fellowship, and three of his colleagues are taking an ancient building technology to Kenya this summer to demonstrate a sustainable alternative to wood construction, which contributes to the devastating deforestation problem in the region. The project, a hybrid wind- and solar-powered radio station on Mfangano Island in Lake Victoria, will introduce local craftspeople to the 600-year-old technique of timbrel vaulting, a system that uses thin clay tiles to create a geometrically-complex and structurally strong building.

Continue reading after the jump.

Landscape Architect Proposes a Cycling Superhighway Over a London Canal

Courtesy of Design International

(Courtesy Design International)

500-cyclists and pedestrians an hour simultaneously traveling along the same route bordering the Regent’s Canal in north London certainly makes for one congested—and with cyclists and pedestrians jockeying for limited space, a treacherous—commute. According to BD Online, landscape architect Anthony Nelson, director at Design International, has proposed a dramatic solution that could resolve the long-standing battle between fast-moving cyclists and slower pedestrians.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Product> Clutter-Free Options In The Hidden Kitchen

National, Product
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
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B2-kitchen-kitchen tool cabinet by Bulthaup

B2-kitchen-kitchen tool cabinet by Bulthaup.

As interior footprints shrink, compact organization grows increasingly important—particularly in the kitchen. Below is a compilation of some of the smartest solutions to keep the heart of the home clutter-free.

B2-Kitchen-Kitchen Tool Cabinet
Bulthaup

German manufacturer Bulthaup’s B2 kitchen workshop (above) is the perfect disguise for the home cook. The kitchen implement cabinet is outfitted with multiple compartments to store accouterments from pots and pans to pantry items. Adjustable shelves, formatted containers, and storage systems all fit uniformly behind the folding doors. It works in a loft, studio, or office environment.

Continue reading after the jump.

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AIA Announces 2013 Small Project Award Recipients

National
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
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Tahoe City Transit Center.

Tahoe City Transit Center. (Courtesy AIA)

The American Institute of Architects has announced the winners of the 2013 Small Project Awards, a program dedicated to promoting small-project designs. Since 2003 the AIA Small Projects Award Program has emphasized the work and high standards of small-project architects, bringing the public’s attention to the significant designs of these small-projects and the diligent work that goes into them. This year’s ten winners are grouped into four categories: projects completed on a budget under $150,000, projects with a budget under $1.5 million, projects under 5,000 square feet, and theoretical design under 5,000 square feet.

View all the winners after the jump.

St. Louis Eyes Shipping Container Architecture

Midwest, Newsletter
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
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(Courtesy Delsa Development)

(Courtesy Delsa Development)

A new development in St. Louis has proposed using shipping containers to create a mixed-use building. The project, known as The Grove, is located at 4312 Manchester Avenue. It features a three-story structure of stacked steel boxes with retail on the first level and offices and residential above. The development, which already garnered the support of the Forest Park Southeast Development Committee, is set on the site of a former four-family brick home and is presently awaiting approval from the 17th Ward Alderman.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cincinnati’s Bike Hub Connects the City With Smale Riverfront Park

Midwest
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
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The bike hub in Cincinnati's Smale Waterfront Park. (Randy Simes / Urban Cincy)

The bike hub in Cincinnati’s Smale Waterfront Park. (Randy Simes / Urban Cincy)

As one of a slew of successful placemaking initiatives of late, along with the recently reopened Washington Park, Cincinnati’s Phyllis W. Smale Riverfront Park is a key component of the city’s resurgent urban identity. It’s a multi-faceted design, aspiring to filter water for flood control, provide green space and connect two downtown stadiums with a multimodal trail along the Ohio River.

Continue reading after the jump.

Construction of Expanded Brooklyn Greenway Underway

East
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
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Rendering of the greenway through Brooklyn. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

Rendering of the greenway through Brooklyn. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

With the arrival of the Citi Bike share program just around the corner, and the Regional Planning Association’s Harbor Ring proposal gaining momentum, New York’s cycling community can now set its sights on the Brooklyn Greenway. The proposed 14 miles of bike lanes running from Bay Ridge to Greenpoint aim to provide a safe route for cyclists and pedestrians wishing to cross the borough. As Gothamist reported, the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) is preparing to begin construction on three more sections of the path, in Red Hook, Greenpoint, and the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Continue reading after the jump.

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