Unveiled> SOM Designs Mashreq Bank Tower in Dubai

International
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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(Courtesy SOM)

(Courtesy SOM)

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) announced last week it would design a new headquarters for Dubai-based Mashreq Bank. The 32-story tower is “a quiet sculptural form within Dubai’s skyline,” SOM Design Director Ross Wimer said in a statement. Its L-shaped floor plate is cantilevered around an empty volume between the building’s eight-story podium and its top levels.

The building’s massing shields that courtyard from solar gain, while opening up views to Sheikh Zayed Road and the Burj Khalifa to the east. Executive offices occupy the top two floors, where the square floorplate resumes, with Mashreq’s Board Room suspended from an interior opening at the middle.

Registration Open> Facades+PERFORMANCE Symposium, Workshops in Chicago

National
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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(Courtesy Behnisch Architekten).

(Courtesy Behnisch Architekten)

Launched in 2012 in collaboration by The Architect’s Newspaper and Enclos, the Facades+ conference series is heading back to Chicago for two days of architecture symposium and workshops with a brand new theme: Performance. On October 24th and 25th, keynote speakers Stefan Behnisch of Behnisch Architekten and Gerardo Salinas of Rojkind Arquitectos, as well as a host of recognized architects, innovators, and engineers will engage attendees on the subject of facade design within the last five years, specifically sustainable, yet aesthetically pleasing construction. Day one hosts a symposium of panel speakers and networking opportunities. And during day two, attendees make the choice between tech or dialog workshops, both intimate groups with hands-on training and personal discourse. Registration is now open for both days and early bird rates apply until September 27th.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

Houston’s 1927 Buffalo Bayou Reservoir Digitally Mapped and Open for Reuse Proposals

City Terrain, Southwest
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
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The "Cistern," constructed in 1927, was Houston's first drinking water reservoir. (Courtesy Buffalo Bayou Partnership)

The “Cistern,” constructed in 1927, was Houston’s first drinking water reservoir. (Courtesy Buffalo Bayou Partnership)

During construction on the Buffalo Bayou Partnership‘s (BBP) Buffalo Bayou Park Shepherd to Sabine project—which began in 2010 and is seeking to transform the downtown park into a catalyst for making Houston a more livable city—workers rediscovered an underground concrete cistern that had been built in 1927 as the city’s first drinking water reservoir. It performed decades of service before springing a leak that couldn’t be located or contained, at which point the 87,500-square-foot subterranean chamber was sealed up and forgotten. Today, the old piece of infrastructure is an inspiring, if somewhat erie space. Accessed through manholes and 14-foot ladders, the man-made cavern features row upon row of cathedral-like 25-foot-tall columns standing in several inches of still water. BBP would like to see the space adaptively reused, but such an endeavor currently lies outside the scope of its Shepherd to Sabine project. So to drum up interest in renovating the space, the organization commissioned Houston company SmartGeoMetrics to create a 3D fly-through of the cistern.

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Wiel Arets wins design for Europaalee Site

International
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
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Courtesy Wiels Arets Architects

Civic space and facade of building (Courtesy Wiel Arets Architects)

Wiels Arets Architects recently won a competition to design the “Europaallee site D” building in Zurich. The building is a pivotal component in the emerging mixed use district of “Europaallee,” a major infrastructure project which will incorporate 6,000 workplaces, 1,800 study spaces, 400 flats, one hotel, shops, restaurants, and other leisure activities. The winning entry accommodates retail activities and circulation spaces on the lower floors, while the upper volumes contain flexible office space. The building has been designed with scope for a residential component in the future.

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4,765 Hugs in Store for Supporters of Successfully Funded Marina Abramović Institute Kickstarter

East
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
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Rendering of MAI Visitors Observing Interior Performance Hall (Courtesy OMA)

Rendering of MAI Visitors Observing Interior Performance Hall (Courtesy OMA)

Marina Abramović owes 4,765 hugs to the supporters of her successfully funded $600,000 Kickstarter. Last month, the artist launched the online campaign to fund her own Marina Abramović Institute (MAI) in upstate New York, a performance center conceptualized as a laboratory that will be dedicated to the practice of long-durational performance art and the “Marina Abramović Method.” Project donations ranged from $1 to $10,000 and all donors are invited to receive a personal hug from the artist in a future performance event called “The Embrace.” With help from social media, celebrity interest, and a few encouragements from Abramović herself, the center surpassed its goal by more than $60,000 before the end of its month-long funding period this past Sunday.

Continue reading after the jump

Scott Stringer to Give Harlem’s Historic Fire Watchtower an Expensive Makeover

East
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
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The Harlem Fire Watchtower (Courtesy Paul Lowry)

The Harlem Fire Watchtower is in an extremely dilapidated state. (Courtesy Paul Lowry)

Earlier this week, Manhattan Borough President and City Controller candidate Scott Stringer announced his $1 million pledge to restore a historic Harlem fire watchtower at the heart of Marcus Garvey Park. In the 19th century, the 47-foot tower served as a lookout point and the bell was raised in case of imminent danger. Today, the tower no longer protects the community but threatens it, showing substantial signs of decay and neglect.

Running a tight race against Eliot Spitzer, Stringer lags behind the former governor in terms of African American votes and is thus seeking to salvage one of the community’s most valued landmarks. The past few days, he has generated good publicity from his ability and desire to fund this restoration project.The $1 million provided by Stringer, along with the $1.75 million contributed by Councilmember Inez Dickens and $1.25 million by Mayor Bloomberg will be used to preserve the tower. The project includes a full restoration of the tower’s cast-iron structure, the removal of deficient parts, and the additional construction of a stainless steel support system.

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Le Corbusier’s Carpenter Center for Visual Arts: Fifty Years Later

East
Friday, August 30, 2013
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Folium

Building Facade (Photo Courtesy of Folium from Flickr)

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the construction of the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts. Completed in 1963, it is Le Corbusier’s only major building in the United States, and one of his final commissions before his death in 1965. The renowned modernist architect envisaged a “synthesis of the arts,” the union of architecture with sculpture, painting, and other arts. In the spirit of Corbusier’s unique style, the building stands out among the more traditional architectural prototypes of the Harvard campus. This is evident right from his initial concept sketch of the building, where Corbusier utilized bold colors to denote the new building, while shading the surrounding Harvard campus in dark brown—a color not typically part of his visual palette.

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Letter to the Editor> Master Architect or No, Gehry is Wrong About Los Angeles

Letter to the Editor, West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Joel Mann / Flickr; Montage by AN)

[ Editor's Note: The following is a reader-submitted comment from the AN Blog in response to the post, “Gehry Lets Loose on Los Angeles, Downtown Ambitions,” which cites an interview Frank Gehry did with Los Angeles Magazine. It appeared as a letter to the editor in a recent print edition, AN07_08.14.2013. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

The only thing that makes Los Angeles unique is that so much of it was built during the auto era (albeit on an infrastructural framework established during the interurban rail era). Different parts of Los Angeles were developed in a manner that was identical to how other cities across North America were being developed at the same time. The same succession of transportation, construction, and development technologies created a downtown in Los Angeles that is nearly indistinguishable from portions of San Francisco, Chicago, and Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

New Mural Ordinance Opens Floodgates For Art in Los Angeles

West
Friday, August 30, 2013
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Untitled, by Mister Cartoon & El T Loko (Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles)

Untitled, by Mister Cartoon & El T Loko (Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles)

Finally. Los Angeles’ City Council on Wednesday passed a new mural ordinance, legalizing murals on private buildings after a decade of banning them. Of course would-be public artists still have to go through an extensive permitting process, and pay a$60 fee, but if they’re persistent they can finally go crazy. That is, as long as their murals don’t contain commercial messages.

“It’s a big victory and we’re thrilled,” said Isabel Rojas-Williams, executive director of the Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles. The group has been protecting the city’s murals and muralists since 1987. “Despite the recent restrictions, the city has remained one of the country’s mural capitals.”

Don’t believe us? Behold a selection below of our favorite (finally-sanctioned) murals from around the City of Angels, courtesy of the Mural Conservancy. They range from political to historical to street art / graffiti, to, well…the undefinable. Read More

Disheveled Geometry

Fabrikator
Friday, August 30, 2013
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator

 
Students of Mark Foster Gage's Disheveled Geometries seminar fabricated a 20-by-40-foot panel of Obomodulan. (Mary Burr)

Students of Mark Foster Gage’s Disheveled Geometries seminar fabricated a 20-by-40-inch panel of Obomodulan.  (Burr/Stranix)

Students use parametric design to fashion a porous architectural screen that draws from contemporary marble sculpture.

In the third edition of Mark Foster Gage’s Disheveled Geometries seminar at the Yale School of Architecture, students Mary Burr and Katie Stranix began their exploration of extreme surface textures with marble. Inspired by the sculptural work of Tara Donovan and Elizabeth Turk, the student duo set out to design a delicate yet porous screen that transformed a two dimensional panel into a rhythmic and dynamic 3D structure.

According to Stranix, the first design emerged as an aggregation of several different parts and wasn’t intended for parametric processes. “We wanted to maintain delicacy in our design but add porosity,” she told AN, referencing Herzog & de Meuron’s ground level screen at 40 Bond Street in Manhattan. Working in Maya, the students added elliptical apertures in varying diameters to transform the two-dimensional form in a wavy, 3D screen that departed significantly from a standard panel format. Read More

Studios at the Ranch: Disney Makes Move to “Hollywood North”

West
Thursday, August 29, 2013
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Studios at the Ranch (Disney)

Studios at the Ranch (Disney)

On Tuesday, Los Angeles County’s Board of Supervisors voted to approve Disney’s huge new TV and film production facility on the Golden Oak Ranch near Santa Clarita. The project is being master planned by LA-based firm, Johnson Fain, and the 58-acre “Studios at the Ranch” will include more than 500,000 square feet of studios, sound stages, offices, writers and producers “bungalows” and other developments.

Continue reading after the jump.

Reimagine The Astrodome: Houston Design Ideas Competition Launched

Southwest
Thursday, August 29, 2013
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The Houston Astrodome as it appeared in 2009. (Ed Schipul / Flickr)

The Houston Astrodome as it appeared in 2009. (Ed Schipul / Flickr)

To launch the forthcoming Southwest edition of the Architect’s Newspaper, and to kick-off YKK AP‘s expansion into the region, AN and YKK AP have teamed up to host Reimagine The Astrodome, an Astrodome Reuse Design Ideas Competition. The competition is open to anyone who wishes to participate, whether it be professional architects and engineers or students and artists. Registration opened yesterday afternoon and will close on September 17. Entrants who register by September 6 will get $10 off the registration fee, which is $50 for professionals and $20 for students. The top five proposals, which will be selected by a jury of prominent architects and educators in Houston on October 4, will receive cash prizes and be published in the first issue of AN Southwest, cover date November 6, which will be distributed at the Texas Society of Architect’s 2013 design expo and convention in Fort Worth. Register today!

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