World Trade Update: Glass Rising

East
Monday, March 28, 2011
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The western face of Snohetta's Memorial Museum Pavilion takes on a reflective layer.

It’s been a couple of weeks since we stopped by the WTC site. The most striking aspect from the street remains the speed with which glass surfaces begin to rise. It seems like only yesterday that three stories of glass wrapped around Tower One. Now with ten stories completed, the quartz-like surfaces start to take shape. At the Memorial Museum, Snohetta’s glass has flown up in what seems a matter of days. The facade already reflects the grove, whose trees continue their own march toward West Street.

Check out more photos after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Glass, Steel, Foam, Reel

Daily Clicks
Friday, February 25, 2011
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The living area of the 1928 Maison de Verre in Paris, with its modular shelving and ivory rubberized floor. (Courtesy WSJ Magazine. Photo: Todd Eberle.)

Glass wear. Alistair Gordon visits the entrancingly translucent Maison de Verre in Paris, Pierre Chareau‘s 1928 house of glass blocks, and speaks with current owner Robert M. Rubin about his ongoing restoration of the early modernist icon. Here’s a preview of Gordon’s feature that will appear in the next WSJ Magazine.

Steely resolve. The Calatrava-designed PATH hub for the World Trade Center is now over budget to the tune of $180 million, reports DNA. The stratospheric overrun is due in large part to the decision to use extra steel to “harden” the building for security reasons. The Port Authority Board passed the revised budget on Thursday morning, promising to bankroll the extra costs with a contingency fund.

Featuring…foamcore! San Francisco’s Museum of Craft commandeers a space near the Moscone Center for a pop-up installation that presents architectural model-making as a form of craft. The show offers a glimpse into the process of 20 notable SF-area architecture firms, writes the San Francisco Chronicle.

Awards go immaterial. Producers Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer talk to the Hollywood Reporter about the set design for this year’s Oscars (airing this Sunday), revealing that they’ll rely on projections to create a constantly changing, animated environment within the Kodak Theater. Architect David Rockwell, who designed the sets in 2009 and 2010 (and snagged an Emmy in the process), this year passed the torch to production designer Steve Bass.

World Trade Update: Community Blasts Bus Plan

East
Thursday, February 24, 2011
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Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer pulled together a stellar panel of World Trade movers and shakers to update the community Wednesday night, but the crowd wasn’t impressed. Chris Ward, executive director of the the Port Authority, was joined at the podium by LMDC Chair Avi Schick, DOT Lower Manhattan Commissioner Louis Sanchez, Downtown Alliance President Elizabeth Berger, president and CEO of the memorial Joe Daniels, State Senator Dan Squadron and Congressman Jerry Nadler. Silverstein Properties’ Malcolm Williams breezed through a PowerPoint update detailing progress of the four towers at the site. Ward’s presentation showed the robust ribs of the Calatrava structure from underneath the plaza. But Sanchez’s presentation outlining plans for the accommodating tour buses took on the most scrutiny.

Read More

Bus Bonanza Expected at WTC Memorial

East, East Coast
Tuesday, February 15, 2011
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Memorial grove and the Museum Pavilion under construction.

While most of the World Trade Center site whirls in mid-construction, the National September 11 Memorial is a mere 208 days from completion. That thought brings both relief and consternation to local residents who have seen their neighborhood become a national flash point for mourning, controversy, and debate. It is also about to become one of the most heavily trafficked tourist destinations in the country.

Read more after the jump.

World Trade Weekly: Last of the Deutsche Bank

East, East Coast
Wednesday, February 9, 2011
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[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, AN stops by the massive construction site for a weekly update. ]

From behind a blue tarp shielding the remains of the Deutsche Bank building, the sound of groaning metal being bent into submission has stopped. Debris sits separated in two neat piles, one for crushed cement and the other for metal. A polished Peterbilt mack truck with an empty container made its way through gate to take away yet another load. There were no formalities, but by this time next week the last of the World Trade Center ruins will be gone.

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World Trade Weekly: Lunch Break Edition

East, East Coast
Wednesday, February 2, 2011
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[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, AN stops by the massive construction site for a weekly update. ]

Lunchtime at the World Trade Center site is a colorful sight even on an overcast and foggy day. Hundreds of construction workers in bright yellow and orange safety vests pour into neighborhood delis and pizza joints, but most crowd into the tiny local gourmet food store, the Amish Market. There, burly gents in hard hats hum to the Nat King Cole soundtrack while choosing prosciutto over pastrami. Make no mistake, these guys know food.

Back at the site, just two bays of the Deutsche Bank remain to tear down, a row of windows appeared on the northwest corner of One World Trade, and the steel mullions for a glass curtain wall began to wrap their way around Snøhetta‘s Museum Pavilion.

A photo tour of the construction site just after the jump.

World Trade Weekly: White Out Edition

East, East Coast
Wednesday, January 26, 2011
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[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, AN stops by the massive construction site for a weekly update, nevermind the weather! ]

This week, through a haze of snow, we got a glimpse of the last bits of the former Deutsche Bank building. Shrouded behind a fence covered in blue nylon, the once 41-story tower is the last remaining physical remnant of 9/11 to be cleared away piece by piece.

With visibility low, the sounds of the site take over.  From this vantage, the groaning sound of metal being bent and twisted distinguishes itself from sounds of construction, the swirl of cement inside mixers, the hum of truck engines, and the rhythmic clang of metal banging on metal.

More construction photos after the jump.

World Trade Weekly: White Dots Edition

East, In Construction
Wednesday, January 19, 2011
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At first glance, it seems that the riot of square white panels suddenly appeared on the base of One World Trade, but  photos from the past few weeks show that they were going up all along. Closeup shots taken today reveal metal bolts protruding out from the panels. The curtain wall fasteners for the metallic scrim?

Read More

World Trade Weekly: The Steel Web of Snohetta

East
Wednesday, January 12, 2011
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Photos by Tom Stoelker

Each week, AN plays tourist at the World Trade Center construction site. Here’s the latest.

Last night’s snowstorm was a dud when compared to the Boxing Day Blizzard. But a half hour walk around the WTC site reveals just how much extra work the weather can add to a day’s labor. By noon, workers were still shoveling out of the mess, removing snow laden tarps and generally slogging through the grayish black mess.

Are those trident columns we see inside that Snøhetta?

Weekly World Trade Center Update

East
Wednesday, January 5, 2011
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Photos by Tom Stoelker

As there are few visible changes on the facade, this week’s photos focus on the reinforced concrete at the base of the tower. With much media fanfare, the NYPD opposed initial designs for security reasons. The resulting redesign introduced a fortress-like base and core, which is now visible from the street level. Eventually, the concrete will be shielded behind a metallic scrim, not unlike the one seen next door on Seven World Trade. For now though, pedestrians can glimpse the exposed base to get an idea of the tower’s extraordinary strength.

To see more photos of the tower’s base click here

World Trade Center Continues Upward Despite Blizzard

East
Thursday, December 30, 2010
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The chaos of the blizzard seems to have bypassed the site.

[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, The Architect's Newspaper will be checking in each week for signs of progress at one of the country's most exciting construction sites. ]

The blizzard did little to deter holiday crowds from flocking to the World Trade Center this week. With few office workers in town, hundreds of tourists crushed onto the slushy sidewalks of Church Street. From behind St. Paul’s Chapel, a cacophony of languages could be heard. Construction moved forward with few signs of delay or disruption from this week’s snow and by Wednesday afternoon the site was humming as usual.

View more WTC pics after the jump.

Weekly World Trade Pic

East
Thursday, December 23, 2010
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Another row of windows and corner facets began to emerge this week.

[ As the World Trade Center continues its ascent, The Architect's Newspaper will be checking in each week for signs of progress at one of the country's most exciting construction sites. ]

The pre-holiday bustle reached a lull today at the World Trade Center site as much of downtown seems to have headed home. Even the cranes were moving at a sluggish pace; but they’re still moving. This week, the facets that form elongated triangular corners began to reflect the sunlight a bit more and another row of windows found their way onto the western facade. The holidays are taking hold, too: At dusk, sparkly lights that run the length of the cranes emerge like stars.

Another pic after the jump

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