Zip over Apple’s under-construction headquarters and take a seat in its newly-unveiled auditorium

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
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Apple's auditorium pavilion (Poltrona Frau Group)

Apple’s auditorium pavilion (via Poltrona Frau Group)

The excitement over Apple’s new mega-campus in Silicon Valley continues to build. First, we got an aerial drones-eye-view of the under-construction Apple Campus 2 in Cupertino, California (check it out after the jump!). And now, we get to see the corporate auditorium where the company will show off its new products once complete in 2016.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Drone footage shows construction progress at Norman Foster’s Apple Campus

Architecture, In Construction, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, September 3, 2014
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apple-video2apple-video1

 

Perhaps the most hyped corporate campus in history, Apple’s Norman Foster–designed campus in Cupertino, is starting to come out of the ground. YouTube user jmcminn recently uploaded a video of a (loud) drone flying over the top secret construction site, where work began a few months ago and should continue through 2016. The circular foundations appear to be over a quarter complete.

Watch the video after the jump.

Video> NIKE opens a motion-tracking, LED basketball court in China

The House of Mamba. (Courtesy NIKE)

The House of Mamba. (Courtesy NIKE)

Nike has covered a basketball court in Shanghai with LED sensors and the result looks like a live-action video game. The court is called the “House of Mamba”—not to be confused with the new “House of Vans” in London—and it’s topped with reactive sensors that track players’ every move.

Read More

Video> “Oh Heck Yeah” turns downtown Denver into a communal video arcade

City Terrain, Southwest, Urbanism
Thursday, August 28, 2014
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A series of custom, family friendly video games occupied three blocks of downtown Denver this summer. (Courtesy Oh Heck Yeah)

A series of custom, family friendly video games occupied three blocks of downtown Denver this summer. (Courtesy Oh Heck Yeah)

Whatever you may think of video games (new media art form, societal ill, lame waste of time) there was no avoiding them in downtown Denver this summer. From June 7 to July 26, three blocks of Champa Street between 14th Street and the 16th Street Mall were transformed into one big video arcade. Known as Oh Heck Yeah, the project assembled local and national arts groups and businesses to activate this stretch of turf with a variety of programming centered around a series of custom designed, family friendly video games. Designed by Denver-based creative teams Legwork Studio and Mode Set, the games were played on the Theatre District’s giant LED screens.

Continue reading after the jump.

Al Jazeera launches “Rebel Architecture” documentary on architectural activism

Architecture, International, Media
Tuesday, August 19, 2014
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The "Guerilla Architect." (Courtesy Al Jazeera via Screengrab)

The “Guerilla Architect.” (Courtesy Al Jazeera via Screengrab)

Al Jazeera has launched Rebel Architecture, a six-part documentary that profiles lesser-known architects who are using their design skills “as a form of activism resistance to tackle the world’s urban, environmental and social crises.” These designers aren’t building glass towers for the global elite, but schools, cultural spaces, and homes for everyone else. And they’re often doing it in legal gray area. Read More

Improv Everywhere Turns Humid Subway Station into a Relaxing Spa

The 34th Street sauna. (Courtesy Improv Everywhere)

The 34th Street sauna. (Courtesy Improv Everywhere)

Between June and August, a New York City subway platform is a pretty awful place to find yourself. Over those summer months, the subway has all the smells, crowds, and delays you’re used  to with the unwelcome addition of a shockingly stubborn heat that couldn’t care less that you’re on your way to a job interview.

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Bomb Trains: Vice investigates the dangers of transporting crude oil by rail

After an oil train exploded in Lac Megantic, Quebec last year. (Flickr / EliasSchewel)

After an oil train exploded in Lac Megantic, Quebec last year. (Flickr / EliasSchewel)

In a new video report, Bomb Trains: The Crude Gamble of Oil by Rail, Vice News investigated the risk of crude oil–carrying trains exploding as they crisscross North America. That isn’t some hypothetical risk that could be realized down the road—it’s already happening. Last summer, forty-seven people were killed when an oil-carrying train exploded in a small town in Quebec, and in the year since, four more trains have gone up in flames in the U.S. and Canada. With so many train lines carrying oil through the hearts of American cities, Vice highlights safety concerns for urban areas and rural alike.

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How murals could save Candela’s decaying Miami Marine Stadium

Architecture, Art, East, Preservation
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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The stadium seats last year. (Nicole Anderson / AN)

The stadium seats last year. (Nicole Anderson / AN)

An abandoned, decaying Miami stadium that once hosted the likes of Gloria Estefan, Elvis Presley, and Richard Nixon may finally be coming back to life. Since AN visited the 6,566-seat Marine Stadium last year there is new momentum to revitalize the iconic venue. And just as graffiti symbolized the stadium’s decline, street art could help secure its future.

Read More

2014 New Cities Summit Calls for Re-Imagining the Urban Environment

The Summit workshop "Dallas: A Case Study in Re-imagination and Transformation," June 17, 2014, at the Winspear Opera House. (Courtesy New Cities Foundation)

The Summit workshop “Dallas: A Case Study in Re-imagination and Transformation,” June 17, 2014, at the Winspear Opera House. (Courtesy New Cities Foundation)

Nearly a month has passed now since the more than 800 people from all of the globe who attended this year’s New Cities Summit in Dallas, Texas, packed up their bags, and returned home. Each is now equipped—if the Summit proved its purpose—with a slew of practical ideas on how to positively transform the urban environment, or at least a more robust list of contacts in the fields of government, business, and urban design. For those of you who missed it, the New Cities Foundation has just released an ebook recapitulating what was discussed in its many keynote speeches, workshops, and panel discussions. The foundation has also produced a four-minute highlights movie (embedded below), which captures some of the enthusiastic spirit of this international gathering of urban thinkers and doers, which is now in its third year.

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Video> Facade design experts discuss sustainability, energy efficiency

Today’s facade designers cannot afford to ignore the question of sustainability, and in particular energy efficiency. James O’Callaghan (Eckersley O’Callaghan), William Logan (Israel Berger & Associates), and Will Laufs (LaufsED) sat down with our partners at Enclos during April’s facades+ NYC conference to talk about the push and pull between aesthetics and environmental performance in building envelopes. Top AEC professionals will continue the conversation at facades+ Chicago on July 24–25. For more information or to register, visit the conference website. Early Bird registration ends June 29.

On View> LACMA Takes “Metropolis II” For a Spin

On View, West
Thursday, June 19, 2014
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Metropolis II. (Courtesy LACMA)

Metropolis II. (Courtesy LACMA)

Metropolis II
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California
Ongoing

Metropolis II is a kinetic sculpture by American artist Chris Burden, who is probably best known for his 1971 performance piece Shoot, in which an assistant wielding a .22 rifle shot him in the left arm. Part of LACMA’s permanent collection and on view multiple times per week, the sculpture is modeled after a fast paced, frenetic modern city.

Read More

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Enormous Tower Built of LEGOs in Budapest Is Tallest in the World

International, Skyscrapers
Friday, June 13, 2014
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LEGO Tower (Courtesy So Bad So Good)

LEGO Tower (Courtesy So Bad So Good)

The LEGO tower in Budapest, Hungary has broken the world record for “tallest structure built with interlocking plastic blocks.” The tower was completed and registered with the Guinness Book of World Records on May 25th at a height of 114 feet. The previous record was 112.9 feet and was set through the combined efforts of students from the red clay consolidated school district in Delaware. According to the blog So Bad So Good, the new tower was erected by LEGO architects, who received some help from local primary school children. The tower was topped with a Rubik’s cube: a Hungarian invention.

See more of the tower after the jump.

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