BIG Reveals New Concrete Plan For Kimball Art Center After First Design Rejected by Public

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
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BIG's new plan lifts up to reveal a glassy entrance. (Kimball Art Museum)

BIG’s new plan lifts up to reveal a glassy entrance. (Courtesy BIG / Kimball Art Center)

Thanks in large part to public protest, Bjarke Ingelsplans for a twisted, log-cabin-like box for Park City’s Kimball Art Center have been dramatically changed. Earlier this month Ingels’ firm BIG unveiled a new design: a concrete wedge lifting 46 feet above the corner of Main and Heber Streets. “The building seems to rise with Main Street and the mountain landscape, while bowing down to match the scale of the existing Kimball,” Ingels said in a statement.

Continue reading after the jump.

Public Opinion Keeps BIG’s Kimball Art Center Renovation on Hold

Architecture, Newsletter, West
Tuesday, December 17, 2013
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(Courtesy BIG)

BIG’s log cabin design for the Kimball Art Center is in limbo after being received by an unimpressed public. (Courtesy BIG)

Despite winning the Kimball Art Center renovation commission in February of last year, Bjarke Ingels Group’s design proposal is far from beginning construction in Park City, Utah. After a seven-member jury of officials, architects, and a Park City resident chose the BIG museum revamp from a shortlist of designs from several prominent firms, the public made their dissatisfaction clear. The building is on hold and without community approval it will continue to sit in stasis for an indeterminable amount of time.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

After Fire, Redevelopment Effort Lifts Utah Temple Onto Stilts

West
Friday, May 31, 2013
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Provo Temple Construction (hansenbrian/Flickr)

Provo Temple Construction (hansenbrian/Flickr)

In Provo, Utah, a new temple is rising, literally, on the site of a disaster. When a devastating fire ripped through the 112-year-old tabernacle in 2010, destroying its wooden interiors and steeples, community members mourned the loss of their historic house of worship. But with the building’s 7-million-pound stone shell still standing, a new plan was devised to transform its remains into a temple. Now the building’s skin, reinforced by shotcrete and steel beams, has been “lifted” 40 feet off the ground on steel and concrete piles.

More after the jump.

Prominent Shortlist for Park City’s Kimball Art Center

National
Thursday, January 12, 2012
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A stacked-timber design by BIG / Bjarke Ingels Group.

A stacked-timber design by BIG / Bjarke Ingels Group. (All images courtesy Kimball Art Center)

Five noted teams have been shortlisted from a pool of 18 to renovate and expand the Kimball Art Center (KAC) in Park City, Utah. The firms include BIG/Bjarke Ingels Group; Brooks + Scarpa Architects; Sparano + Mooney Architecture; Will Bruder + Parnets; and Todd Williams Billie Tsien Architects. The center offers exhibitions as well as art classes, workshops, and other educational programs. Plans call for renovating the interior of the existing KAC and constructing a new modern building next door. Each of the proposals will be displayed using augmented reality, photography, and video during the Sundance Film Festival from January 19 through the 29 and a jury will select a winner in February once the public has had a chance to weigh in on their favorites. Construction could begin as soon as mid-2013 with the new wing opening in 2015.

Check out all the proposals after the jump.

Quick Clicks>Spirals, Alchemy Tower, Sidewalk Cocktails, & Chemicals

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, June 14, 2011
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(Courtesy Maniasmias)

(Courtesy Maniasmias)

Spiraling Out of Control. Salt Lake Tribune reported that the New York-based Dia Foundation‘s failure to pay the annual land fees for Robert Smithson‘s Spiral Jetty has resulted in the state of Utah’s appropriation of the artist’s famous “earthwork masterpiece.” Dia subsequently released a statement explaining that they were not aware of the pressing payment and are in negotiations with the state to ensure the water sculpture’s preservation. Artinfo digs deeper to find that the problem could have been caused by a computer or clerical error and says the Dia Foundation hopes to have the matter resolved by the end of the week.

Bad Chemistry. According to DNA, Lower Chelsea residents are fighting to stop Alchemy Construction‘s development of a 30-story tower at 31 W. 15th Street.  The development firm bypassed standard zoning regulations after securing air rights from the Xavier High School, which will utilize the lower floors as new classrooms and event space.  The Lower Chelsea Alliance maintains that construction of the 300-foot tall building is already causing noise and odor pollution and insist the tower will ruin the neighborhood’s aesthetic character.

Good Mixing. Further uptown, the Wall Street Journal exposes the first gourmet food truck with a one-year liquor license.  The city has permitted the Turkish Taco Truck in Central Park to serve beer, wine, and cocktails as long as it provides seating and remains parked.  Now introducing: better lunch breaks.

Toxicology. The New York Times reveals the National Toxicology Program‘s recent report identifying formaldehyde and styrene as carcinogens. While consumers are at minimal risk due to the low quantities in wood construction materials and plastics, respectively, the chemicals pose a serious threat to factory workers.  The industry is attempting to dispute these results, but some manufacturers have already sought alternative production.

Utah House Becomes High Plains Drifter

West
Thursday, June 10, 2010
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The Southeastern Utah house designed by architect Clark Stevens. (Courtesy Architizer)

As Kermit once declared, “It’s not easy being an architect.” From the 2-feet-too-tall M Cube to the near-destruction of old masters, there seem to be problems around every corner. The story of Clark Stevens is doubly tragic, which Architizer ran today. You see, like many a sad architectural story, Stevens was working on one of his many glorious prairie houses when the recession hit and the client canceled it, and not only that, but there was a considerable squabble over fees, which client did not realize would grow as the size of the project did. After months of struggle a settlement was reached, about the best Stevens could hope for. A little while later, Read More

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